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Scanned from the collections of 
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for Audio Visual Conservation 
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Motion Picture and Television Reading Room 
www.loc.gov/rr/mopic 

Recorded Sound Reference Center 
www.loc.gov/rr/record 




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APRIL 4, 1955 





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3ROADCASTI NG 

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Com 



plete Index 

Pmi f I 



IN THIS ISSUE: 



BC Radio Maps 
w Weekend Plan 

Page 27 



1 



re-Te$t$ Ads 
\ltoona 'Lab' 
Page 28 




'akes First Step 
De-Intermixture 
Page 64 

is Comments 
Booster Plan 

ige 66 

URE SECTION 

ins on Page 35 



4 



year 



* NEWSWEEKLY 
ADIO AND TV 




theKMBC-KFRM radio TEAM 



in the Heart of America 



Big-league baseball coverage is typical of the 
high-powered programming that has made 
KMBC-KFRM the leading radio combination in 
the great Heart of America market. On the air 
ISV2 hours a day, the Team carries a finely 
balanced program schedule that's nationally fam- 
ous for building and holding a tremendous 



audience. Local-flavor news of regional impor- 
tance, "live" entertainment and one of the most 
active farm departments in radio — together with 
CBS network programming — set the stage for 
advertising results can't be equalled. For 

baseball adjacencifc. und choice run-of-the-log 
availabilities, see your Free & Peters Colonel 



KMBC-KFRM 

One of America's great radio stations— 6th Oldest CBS Affiliate 




Primary Basic CBS Radio 




Free & Peters, Inc. 

Exclulive National Rtpretenlativet 



...and for television, 
the Swing is to KMBC-TV 
Kansas City's Most 

Powerful TV Station 

A 



Another thinly disguised WJR success story 





You take the station break, I'll sell the milk 



One of WJR's regular advertisers is a rapidly 
growing Detroit dairy. They sponsor a program 
twice weekly, and on Sundays, around noon. 

Their commercials end with their telephone 
number, so people can order milk, and they re- 
port that no commercial ever goes unanswered. 

Sundays were no different — except that the 
dairy was closed Sundays. All who called got 
"no answer." 

What did they do? Easy. They called WJR, 
instead. There's no switchboard operator Sun- 
day, so the announcers took down milk orders 
and we called them to the dairy on Monday. 

The Sunday commercial doesn't have a phone 



number any more — it got too hard to make sta- 
tion breaks between 12:30 and 1 p.m. Sunday. 

Which shows that WJR listeners are so anxious 
to own WJR-advertised products that a little 
thing like "no answer" doesn't stop them. They 
know they can count on WJR. 

That's why so many smart advertisers — ones 
eager to sell the 16,000,000 people (10 per cent 
of U.S. buying power) in WJR's primary cover- 
age area — are WJR advertisers. They know the 
best — and cheapest — way to move goods fast is to 
buy spot radio on key stations. 

Your Henry I. Christal representative will tell 
you about WJR. It's quite a story. 



The Great Voice of the Great Lakes 

%M ^Rt. D '' ir "'' 

50,000 Watts CHS Radio Network 



WJR'S primary coverage area: 
16,000,000 people 




SATURDAY EVENING POST 



.DECEMBER 25, ,954 




ARE THEY THE 

Funniest Pair on the Air? 

Hy GEORGE SESSIONS PERRY 

Scripts? Rdieaiaafc? Bob and Kav use neither in a<!-fib,bing ihcir ua\ ibrmiuli 
more t ban 20 b»yi> ot rioricctisc a vu'ck 
that tiit'jii- trrc-wbwSits" comedian? 1 may 



[KED MJ.KN lias ton* !«■>•;! 
1(1111 k Hit «ii.t Ins ila.a . ,„ a 
rfUrtmtil .KTr..TOli«M. .f»,fi: 



iiav »l)i> Kllit.lt ami Kav ( In. al Ilia nt-twaf am 



WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 




WBZ+WBZA • WBZ-TV, Boston; KYW'WPTZ, Philadelphia; 
KDKA • KDKA-TV, Pittsburgh; WOWO, Fort Wayne; 
KEX, Portland; KPIX, San Francisco 
KPIX represented by The Katz Agency, Inc. 
All other WBC stations represented by Free & Peters, Inc. 



Bob & Ray 

NOW ON WBZ + WBZA 



The clowns are back in Boston town. And all 
New England's laughing every weekday from 
5 to 6 p.m. Women, tuned to the afternoon 
serials, stay for Bob and Ray. The youngsters 
dial a smile at 5 p.m., too. And during the 
5 o'clock traffic rush you can follow Bob and 
Ray from car to car. 

Give your commercials the fabulous Bob 
and Ray punch on New England's most 
powerful voice. Remember, you cover 51 
counties, 6 states with WBZ+WBZA. For 
availabilities, call Bill Williamson, WBZ+ 
WBZA Sales Manager at ALgonquin 4-5670. 
Or call Eldon Campbell, WBC National Sales 
Manager, PLaza 1-2700, New York. 



Published every Monday, with Yearbook Numbers (53rd and 54th issues) published in January and July by Broadcasting Publications, Inc., 1735 
DeSales St., N.W., Washington 6, D. C. Entered as second class matter March 14, 1933, at Post Office at Washington, D. C, under act of March 3, 1879. 



RING TONIC 




WGAL-TV is a marvelous, rejuvenating 
sales elixir! This super-powered station 
gives your selling tremendous new im- 
petus because it has a potent effect on 
the spending habits of more than three 
million people who have an effective 
annual buying income of $5 billion, 
who spend $3 billion every year. 
WGAL-TV istheone station that reaches 
this vast, responsive audience. Buy your 
Channel 8 spring sales tonic — now.' 



Representatives: 



EEKER TV, INC. 



Channel 8 Mighty 
Market Place 



Harrisburg 


Reading 


York 


Lebanon 


Hanover 


Pottsville 


Gettysburg 


Hazleton 


Chambersburg 


Shamokin 


Waynesboro 


Mount Carmel 


Frederick 


Bloomsburg 


Westminster 


Lewisburg 


Carlisle 


Lewistown 


Sunbury 


Lock Haven 


Martinsburg 


Hagerstown 



New York 
Los Angeles 



Chicago 
San Francisco 



STEINMAN STAT ION 

CLAIR McCOLLOUGH, PRES. 



Page 4 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



closed circuit 



PARK AVENUE WHODUNIT • Dr. 

Frank Stanton in his own behalf as head 
of investment group (399 Park Avenue 
Corp.) and not as president of CBS Inc. 
has exercised option on 399 Park Avenue 
block for personal investment. (CBS, for 
its own expansion, reportedly is looking 
at property "north of city.") Option by 
Stanton group had been held since 1950 
at $500,000 per year for 72-year lease 
(30-year original lease and two 21 -year 
options) and was exercised last Wednes- 
day just prior to March 31 expiration. 
Stanton group plans to tear down proper- 
ties and build modern office structure after 
present tenants vacate. Site is opposite 
new Lever House. 

B»T 

LATEST name to hit list of candidates for 
Comr. Frieda B. Hennock's membership 
on FCC is that of Dr. Franklin Dunham, 
chief of radio and tv, U. S. Office of Edu- 
cation, and former NBC education and 
public affairs director. Dr. Dunham, 62, 
is widely traveled, has been decorated by 
France and holds Papal decoration as 
Knight of the Holy Sepulchre. Miss Hen- 
nock's term expires June 30. 

B»T 

'MONITOR' PROBLEMS • There'll be 
serious time clearance problems facing 
NBC Radio's negotiating teams when they 
start dickering with affiliates on details of 
new Monitor program for weekends (see 
pages 7, 27), judging by first reactions to 
plan divulged on closed circuit Friday af- 
ternoon. With each station having own 
local programming and spot commitments, 
negotiators will run up against usual prob- 
lem of local vs. network payments for 
given facility. "It's just another attempt by 
NBC to get into the spot business," one 
affiliate manager said after hearing closed 
circuit. 

B«T 

FIRST look at results of extensive field 
testing of remote control operation indi- 
cates high-power and directional equip- 
ment can be operated successfully, follow- 
ing pattern of low-power transmitters. Ex- 
periments at 17 stations will be unveiled 
at NARTB Engineering Conference May 
25-26, during Washington convention 
week. 

B»T 

TUNE-UP • To ascertain cost factors and 
other intricacies of conversion of vhf tv 
sets to receive uhf range, Sen. Warren G. 
Magnuson (D-Wash.) has called in half- 
j dozen leading tuner and strip manufac- 
' turers for private session April 20. This 
I will precede April 25 meeting of receiving 
set manufacturers with Sen. Magnuson's 
| Commerce Committee in effort to evolve 
I voluntary agreement whereby all future 
sets would be all-band to alleviate circula- 

\ 



tion problem in uhf. Identities of com- 
panies called in not revealed, presumably 
because of antitrust aspects. 

B»T 

ONE TOP tuner maker, Sarkes Tarzian, 
operator of ch. 4 WTTV (TV) Blooming- 
ton, Ind., is expected to show "confidence" 
in future of uhf by applying soon for sev- 
eral uhf satellites in Indiana, Illinois and 
possibly Ohio. Mr. Tarzian estimates sat- 
tellites could be built for about $60,000 
each. 

BeT 

NETWORK SATELLITES • Major tv net- 
works are understood to be showing con- 
siderable interest in affiliating with stations 
having uhf satellites in rural areas where 
present coverage is lacking. There is pros- 
pect of high-power uhf outlets with 2,000- 
ft. towers to fill in white areas between 
major markets. 

B»T 

HAROLD C. STUART, former Assistant 
Secretary of Air Force, now practicing 
law in Washington and Tulsa, will move 
to Tulsa this fall to assume policy direction 
of KVOO-AM-TV. He plans to spend 
one-third to one-fourth of his time in Wash- 
ington in his administrative law practice. 
Now vice president of Central Plains En- 
terprises Inc. (KVOO-TV), he will super- 
vise building of new plant to house both 
am and tv operations. KVOO-TV (ch. 2) 
goes to full 100 kw power next month. 
Vice president and general manager of 
KVOO-AM is William B. Way. C. B. 
Akers is general manager of tv operations. 

B»T 

STILL BAITING • Though most New 
York broadcasters are adhering to anti- 
"bait-switch" code they adopted few weeks 
ago, violations persist. Sub-standard prac- 
tices reported by New York's Better Busi- 
ness Bureau point to at least three tv sta- 
tions. Most effective voluntary cleanup 
said to have been in radio. Tv has been 
slower, particularly in copy modification. 
In general, facelifting of radio-tv copy has 
been noticeable since code adopted, BBB 
sources say. 

B»T 

SWEDISH business interests are formulat- 
ing project for commercial television as 
opposed to present government plan for 
government-owned system supported by 
receiving set taxes. With only limited 
experimental operation now underway in 
Stockholm, group has commissioned Per 
Norlin, vice chairman and director of Scan- 
dinavian Airlines System, to U. S. to ex- 
plore American tv methods and develop 
project which would contemplate either 
private system or jointly owned system. 
Scandinavian Airlines is owned 50-50 by 
government and private interests. 

B»T 

BACK FOR MORE • Noxzema Chemical 
Co., which was dropped from Ed Mur- 



row's Person to Person on CBS-TV be- 
cause network wanted "institutional" ad- 
vertiser on it, is unhappy about that ex- 
perience but is in market for another tv 
show. Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles, 
New York, is agency. 

B»T 

WALL STREET JOURNAL has been 
catching it from broadcasters as well as 
Station Representatives Assn. (see page 
59) on its March 21 story carrying head- 
line "Fading Radio." Complainants (among 
them Charles W. Balthrope, KITE San 
Antonio; Tim Elliot, WCUE Akron; Hugh 
K. Boice Jr., WEMP Milwaukee, and J. 
Milton Hall, KWBB Wichita) are in same 
vein: that story did not bear out headline 
which dealt only with network phase of 
radio. 

EISENHOWER MYSTERY • Whether 
President Eisenhower will formally address 
NARTB Convention in Washington week 
of May 22 remained undecided last week. 
Prospect, however, was that if his schedule 
would not permit full-dress speech, he 
might make brief off-the-cuff appearance. 

B»T 

IT'S UNLIKELY FCC will appeal either 
so-called Camden or Spartanburg cases 
wherein the Court of Appeals ordered 
hearings by the FCC under mandatory 
provisions of Sec. 309 (c). But Commis- 
sion is hopeful it will get relief at this 
session of Congress along lines of its ma- 
jority request to eliminate automatic hear- 
ing [B»T, March 28]. Rep. Oren Harris 
(D-Ark.), chairman of Subcommittee on 
Communications, House Interstate & For- 
eign Commerce Committee, is expected to 
introduce bill calling for this amendment 
sometime soon. 

B»T 

LOOKING FOR HOME • Longines 
Wittnauer Watch Co., New York, which 
had been notified by CBS-TV that as of 
May 13 its four-year program Longines 
Wittnauer Chronoscope will go off air, 
plans to continue to underwrite show, 
probably sometime next fall, and is looking 
for place on another network. Firm will 
continue sponsoring its radio program on 
CBS Radio. Victor A. Bennett Co., New 
York, is agency. 

B»T 

BIOW-BEIRN-TOIGO, New York, for un- 
disclosed Procter & Gamble product is 
placing radio-tv spot announcement cam- 
paign starting April 18 in about 25 tele- 
vision and 50 radio markets. Daytime 
minutes in radio and day and nighttime 
minutes, seven days weekly in tv, are being 
used. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 5 




s 



KTHS 



(LITTLE ROCK) 



REGALLY SERVES 



de (keen, too: 



When you use 50,000-watt KTHS, you obviously 
expect a lot more than Metropolitan Little 
Rock. You expect extensive coverage of 
most of Arkansas. 

KTHS delivers! De Queen (Ark.) for example, with a 
population of 3,015, is only one of scores 
of smaller cities, towns and villages served by 
KTHS throughout the State. Yet by itself, 
De Queen represents only about one tenth 
of one percent of the people in the KTHS 
interference-free daytime coverage area! 

In Arkansas, use the BIG radio value — KTHS, 
Basic CBS. 



KTHS 



50,000 Watts 
CBS Radio 



BROADCASTING FROM 

LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS 

Represented by The Branham Co. 

Under Same Management as KWKH, Shreveport 

Henry Clay, Executive Vice President 
B. G. Robertson, General Manager 




The Station KTHS daytime primary (0.5MV/M) area has 
a population of 1.002,758 people, of whom over 100.000 
do not receive primary daytime service from any other 
radio station . . . Our interference-free daytime coverage 
area has a population of 3.372,433. 



Page 6 



April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



at deadline 



NBC'S 'OPERATION REDESIGN' FOR RADIO 
DESCRIBED BY WEAVER IN CLOSED CIRCUIT 



FIRST disclosure of NBC Radio's revolution- 
ary plan to revitalize network radio through 
new type of weekend programming was made 
Friday afternoon in private closed-circuit talk 
by NBC President Sylvester L. (Pat) Weaver 
Jr. He spoke to affiliates over nationwide loop, 
describing details of new continuous Saturday 
morning-Sunday night Monitor program (see 
story page 27). 

NBC is shooting for 50% cumulative week- 
end audience when it opens Monitor June 12, 
Mr. Weaver said. He added that advertisers 
using flexible "pattern of positions" during 
40-hour program can take advantage of this 50 
rating. Third of people are driving on week- 
ends and using auto radios, he said. 

"This is not a retreat," Mr. Weaver insisted, 
describing details of "new and effective pro- 
gram patterns" that will work for advertisers. 
"This is what we have to do to get the money," 
he explained, predicting advertisers "will be 
back in the medium to stay." 

"For the first time radio looks at the whole 
field, with no rules," he said. "Soon people 



EDWARD LAMB took witness stand before 
FCC Examiner Herbert Sharfman Friday in 
6 ^-month-old hearing on license renewal of 
his WICU (TV) Erie, Pa., and under detailed 
examination by FCC Broadcast Bureau he 
emphatically denied that he ever was legal 
advisor to International Labor Defense in 
1930s, ever attended ILD meetings or allowed 
use of his name by front organization, ever 
knew ILD had so used his name, ever wrote 
article appearing under his name in 1936 Sunday 
edition of Daily Worker, ever sent telegram in 
1948 to Worker editor John Gates. 

Mr. Lamb said article in Sunday Worker 
about "Two Women, Both Fearless Fighters 
for the People" (widows of Russian leader 
Nikolai Lenin and Sun Yat-Sen, first president 
of Chinese Republic, whom Mr. Lamb once 
interviewed on world tour) may have been 
picked up by someone at one of numerous 
chautauqua talks he delivered on "Five Fa- 
mous Women Today," one of whom also in- 
cluded Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt. He said he 
often gave copies of talks to reporters. 

Mr. Lamb related trips abroad in 1933 and 
1935 as "tourist and observer," during both 
of which he visited Russia. He said he "tried 
to interview people in all walks of life every- 
where I visited," but didn't consult any top 
Soviet officials. He submitted news stories to 
hometown papers, copies of which were intro- 
duced by FCC. 

Mr. Lamb denied ever "attending school" 
in Russia, although he visited schools, hospitals, 
factories, etc. He recalled sitting behind Stalin 
at football game, speaking few words to him, 
"but there was nothing sinister about it." 

WICU owner related legal work as defense 
counsel (appointed by American Civil Liber- 
ties Union) for striking employes and union at 



will again be saying, 'Did you hear. . . ?' " 

Opening his closed-circuit talk with a cheery 
"Hello, fellows," Mr. Weaver described affiliate 
committee negotiations and told of what he 
said was unanimous committee support of Mon- 
itor. He said some commercial details of Mon- 
itor were too confidential for nationwide closed 
circuit talk and would be explained in person 
by station relations personnel. 

Jim Fleming, creator of Today and other 
programs, told how NBC Radio is setting up 
communications desk in Radio City to keep in 
touch with world. He introduced excerpts 
of Monitor, with such typical features as Mor- 
gan Beatty commentary, sports events, music 
from foreign city and broadcast from jet plane. 
Dramatic, comedy and biographical sketches 
will be offered and such features as housewife 
complaints, weekly accolade, gags by prom- 
inent personalities and many types of vignettes. 

Mr. Weaver said radio, with tape, can do 
many things tv can't do. He reminded affiliates 
that radio must face facts and not pretend tele- 
vision isn't here. 



Electric Auto-Lite Corp. in Toledo in 1934. 
He said as lawyer he defended all employes 
regardless of their political, religious or racial 
background, but had difficult time arbitrating 
wide factions stirred up by agitators such as 
Louis Budenz who were attempting to advance 
themselves politically and get publicity. 

Mr. Lamb similarly recounted legal work for 
striking union workers at McGuffey, Ohio, 
later that year. He said AFL retained him. 

Upon protest of Broadcast Bureau, examiner 
refused to allow Mr. Lamb to read preliminary 
statement before testimony. Copies given press 
before taking stand show he would have said 
"not I alone, but my government is on trial." 
He has called FCC hearing "political frameup." 
Hearing was to continue with further question- 
ing of Mr. Lamb Saturday. 



NO PICTURE 

SOMETHING new in tv spots has been 
started on WBKB (TV) Chicago by 
Cole-Finder Inc., local Mercury car deal- 
er, which bought series of 50 weekly 
four-second audio-only spots in nightly 
7-11 p.m. bracket to introduce station's 
local and ABC network programs. Ster- 
ling C. (Red) Quinlan, vice president of 
station, describes concept as "commer- 
cial promotion announcements," with 
this type tag line: "Cole-Finder invites 
you to watch Disneyland." Mr. Quinlan 
points out no sales pitch or video slides 
are employed to promote dealer and thus 
claims no "triple-spotting" involved. 
Fifty-two week contract placed through 
Irving Rocklin & Assoc. 



• BUSINESS BRIEFLY 

FIELD BUYS RADIO • Saturation radio spot 
campaign calling for average of 90 announce- 
ments per week on five "leading" Chicago sta- 
tions by Marshall Field & Co. for its budget 
floor revealed Friday by Radio Advertising 
Bureau. Agency is Calkins & Holden, Chicago. 
Retail store will promote "merchandise at 
price" items (apparel, luggage, other products) 
in competition with other floors in 60-second 
spots starting April 10. Contract hailed by 
agency, station and bureau executives as mile- 
stone in Chicago retail department store circles. 

PARKER CHANGES AGENCY • Parker 
Pen Co., Janesville, Wis. (Parker 51-21, Jotter 
ball point pen, pencils, desk sets), appoints 
Tatham-Laird Inc., Chicago, to handle adver- 
tising after 12-year association with J. Walter 
Thompson Co. T-L already handles advertis- 
ing for Parker's Flaminaire cigarette lighter. 
Firm has concentrated on printed media (about 
$1.5 million annually) but has used some tele- 
vision, including spot and sponsorship of CBS- 
TV's Four Star Playhouse (dropped last Janu- 
ary). Drive to be launched early this summer 
to capitalize on back-to-school theme. 

EYEING KID SHOW • Borden Co. and Gen- 
eral Foods, both through Young & Rubicam, 
N. Y., understood to be considering CBS-TV's 
new weekly, 7:30-8 p.m. lineup of juvenile 
fare (story page 82) for possible sponsorship. 

MAXWELL HOUSE RADIO • General Foods, 
for Maxwell House coffee (regular), starts radio 
spot announcement campaign April 6 to run 
through May 27 in 10 markets in three western 
states plus Chicago, Dallas and Fort Worth. 
Benton & Bowles, N. Y., is agency. 

NATIONAL EXPANSION • Harriet Andre 
Inc. (Tress-Kit, plastic cap, and Wonder Jim, 
exercisor), N. Y., which has been using tele- 
vision in East, is expanding nationally during 
April with plans to cover about 200 markets in 
all. Product Service, N. Y., is placing campaign. 

TAKE TEA • Tea Council, N. Y., through Leo 
Burnett Co., Chicago, will place heavy tv spot 
campaign in 1 1 markets for iced tea, May 
through August. 

STOUT FELLOWS • Goetz Country Club 
Stout, through Compton Adv., N. Y., is placing 
combined radio-tv spot announcement cam- 
paign using minutes in availabilities near male- 
appeal programs. Schedule starts April 4 and 
May 1 and runs from 13 to 26 weeks. 



F&P Starts Sales Series 

LLOYD GRIFFIN, vice president for television 
at Free & Peters, New York, has announced 
introduction of seven-week sales development 
series covering major aspects of tv spot busi- 
ness for representation firm's tv personnel. 
Guests from stations represented by Free & 
Peters in addition to firm's employes will be 
present at seven Wednesday night sessions in 
series called "Spot Basics." 

In outlining primary objective of series, Mr. 
Griffin said, "An informed salesman who knows 
his prospects, knows his prospect's requirements, 
knows what selling tools are at his disposal 
and how to use them is a successful salesman." 



EDWARD LAMB DENIES RED AFFILIATIONS, 
SAYS NEVER WROTE 'WORKER' STORY 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 7 



BRADFORD 



SUSQUEHANNA 




WBRE-TV Serves a 17 County 
Area in a Matter of Minutes 



WBRE-TV's Regional News Coverage is produced by 
a 10-man news staff, with cameramen strategically 
located at vantage points over the vast area served 
by WBRE-TV. By use of bus and air service, news is 
received, developed (in minutes with high speed 
equipment] and aired the same day it happens .... 
often while the news is still being made. Thus, 
WBRE-TV renders a personal, community service un- 
matched by any other medium. This up-to-the minute 
news service to the 2,000,000 population in WBRE- 
TV's viewing area, has gained for this station an 
audience vastly superior to any TV station reaching 
any part of this great Northeastern Pennsylvania in- 



dustrial and agricultural market. Consider WBRE-TV 
for news. We invite you to make inquiry, because 
you can profit by advertising in the one medium 
which covers these 17 counties whose combined retail 
sales equal America's 12th largest market. 

November, 1954 Wilkes-Barre-Scranton 
Telepulse - Evening News Ratings were as follows: 
WBRE-TV 17.4 
Station B 5.8 
Station C — 
Station D 2.4 

Set Count as of March 1, 1955 245,000 




- TV Ch. 28 Wilkes-Barre, Pa, 

National Representative 
>4/VQQ@ BASIC BUY! The Headley-Reed Co 



Page 8 



April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



PEOPLE 



Tucson Ch. 9 Bid Filed; 
Other New Applications 

BID for new tv station on ch. 9 at Tucson, 
Ariz., filed with FCC Friday by Tucson Tv Co., 
owned by D. W. and Kathleen Ingram. Mr. 
Ingram is owner of lumber firm and ware- 
houses. Effective radiated visual power asked 
is 57.7 kw. Estimated cost $271,655, first year 
operating cost $276,000, revenue $300,000. 
Other new applications: 

Sale of WRAD Radford, Va., by multiple- 
station operator Rollins Bcstg. Co. for $125,000 
to Alice and Perry E. Gresham. Latter heads 
Bethany College, Bethany, W. Va. 

Sale of William Schons' 50% interests in WKAI 
Macomb, 111., and KLIL Estherville, Iowa, to 
A. G. Bush, chairman of executive committee of 
Minn. Mining & Mfg. Co. and director KSTP- 
AM-TV St. Paul. Consideration involves can- 
cellation of $40,000 loan to stations. Edward 
Schons retains 50% holdings in two outlets. 

Request for new station at Escondido, Calif., 
on 1510 kc with 5 kw fulltime, directional, filed 



SPONSORED CULTURE 

HECHT Co. program, Music in School, 
broadcast weekly over WGMS Washing- 
ton to 66,000 school children, will be 
carried overseas in several languages by 
Voice of America. Determining factor 
behind VOA decision was fact that Music 
in School is commercially sponsored and 
symbol of cultural achievement under 
American free enterprise broadcast sys- 
tem. Behind sponsorship of series is 
Harry M. Davidow, executive vice presi- 
dent of Hecht Co., one of nation's largest 
department stores. It is used as regular 
music course in Washington schools. 
Hecht Co. donated radios to schools 
lacking equipment. 



by Riverside agencyman W. L. Gleeson and as- 
sociates. Mr. Gleeson holds 68.2%. Others include 
E. L. Barker, chief owner KLOK San Jose, and 
G. R. Pollock, contractor. 

Low Power Tv Favored 

GENERAL approval of FCC's proposal to per- 
mit low powered tv stations in small cities 
(see story page 69) expressed Friday at dead- 
line filings by Radio-Electronics-Television 
Mfrs. Assn., NARTB, Philco, Sylvania and 
WSM-TV Nashville, Tenn. All recommended 
FCC also authorize boosters and satellites. 
Some suggested further moves to permit auto- 
matic operation of transmitters, use of direc- 
tional antennas, off-air relays and permission 
for stations in cities larger than 50,000 popula- 
tion to use low power operation. 

Referring to boosters and satellites, Sylvania 
said on-channel booster would cost $19,500 to 
build, $9,950 yearly to run; off-channel con- 
verter-repeater, $21,500 to build, same amount 
to run; low power, originating station, $44,500 
to build, $18,000 yearly to operate. WSM-TV 
said low cost booster would cost between $5,000 
and $10,000 to build, and about $2,000 per 
year to run. 

KFBC-TV Cheyenne, Wyo., and KSTF 
(TV) Scottsbluff, Neb., were favorable to FCC 
proposal, suggested that satellites be limited 
one to a community, approved booster idea to 
fill in coverage "holes," hit at community tv 
systems as obstacle in way of establishment of 
small city tv stations. 

WN EX-TV Macon Sold for$l 

SALE of ch. 47 WNEX-TV Macon, Ga., by 
Macon Television Co. (owned 80% by WNEX 
Macon and 18% by William A. Fickling) to 
E. K. Cargill, former WMAZ Macon executive 
and theatre owner, and J. C. Barnes Sr., Texas 
oilman, reported Friday with filing of applica- 
tion for FCC approval. Messrs. Cargill and 
! Barnes paying $1 for WNEX-TV, but assuming 
I $260,000 in obligations ($185,000 long term 
| and $75,000 accounts payable). Balance sheet 
I showed WNEX-TV with total deficit of $184,- 
730. Station began operating August 1953, is 
affiliated with NBC. It competes with CBS- 
i affiliated, ch. 13 WMAZ-TV Macon. Unless 
[ transfer is approved,, application said, station 
! will have to cease broadcasting. Mr. Cargill 
will own 25%, Mr. Barnes 75% of station. 



at deadline 



FCC Hits Tv Boosters 

FCC ordered 23 persons allegedly operating il- 
legal tv boosters in central Washington [B«T, 
March 21] to hearing in Seattle beginning May 
9. Order, directed to three unauthorized boost- 
er operations in Quincy, Nespelem and Bridge- 
port, Wash., is to show cause why cease and 
desist order should not be issued. Boosters 
operate by picking up Seattle tv signals, ampli- 
fying and rebroadcasting them. Commission 
also said booster operators were re-broadcasting 
Seattle tv station signals without permission of 
stations concerned. 

WGN to Screen Records 

WGN-AM-TV Chicago has set up own review 
board to screen all record releases because of 
"increasing number of sub-standard" issues. 
Board will meet periodically to help "reinforce 
a traditionally strict music clearance policy," 
according to Bruce Dennis, WGN program 
director. Serving on board, along with Mr. 
Dennis, are J. E. Faraghan, WGN-TV program 
director; Win Jolly, assistant WGN program 
director, and other personnel, including disc 
jockeys. 

Senate Ratifies ITC 

SENATE Friday ratified by vote of 74-1 Inter- 
national Telecommunications Convention with 
annexes and protocol signed in December 1952 
at Buenos Aires, officially placing document 
in effect in part of U. S. ITC represents re- 
vision of Atlantic City Convention of 1947 
[At Deadline, March 7]. Plan has been ap- 
proved by 32 nations. 



UPCOMING 

April 6-7: Senate Juvenile Delinquency 
subcommittee hearings on effect of 
television. Old Supreme Court Room, 
U. S. Capitol. 

April 8-9: Alabama Broadcasters Assn., 
Whitney Hotel, Montgomery. 
For other Upcomings see page 108. 



JAMES C. ZEDER JR., assistant to Bruce E. 
Miller, director of advertising and merchan- 
dising of Plymouth Div. of Chrysler Corp., 
appointed Plymouth's radio-television advertis- 
ing manager. Mr. Zeder formerly was with 
McCann-Erickson, N. Y., and Grant Adver- 
tising, Detroit. 

PETER FINNEY, former vice president in 
charge of radio-tv, Harry B. Cohen Adv., N. Y., 
to Vidicam Pictures Corp., N. Y., as partner 
and executive vice president in charge of cre- 
ative production. 

JOHN F. HENRY, account executive on Amer- 
ican Motors and Nash Motors division ac- 
counts, elected vice president of Geyer Adv., 
N. Y. 

RAY H. KREMER, former radio-tv director 
of Rutledge & Lilienfield, Chicago, appointed 
account executive at CBS Radio Spot Sales, 
Chicago. He was formerly radio-tv director 
at Lambert & Feasley, N. Y. At one time, 
Mr. Kremer was with CBS Radio as director 
of Grand Central Station and also has directed 
radio programs for NBC. 

LEWIS G. GREEN, head of Green Assoc., 
Chicago radio-tv package firm, appointed head 
of radio-tv division of Reincke, Meyer & Finn 
Inc., same city. 

CHARLES D. KASHER, president of Charles 
Antell Inc., announced Friday that he has sold 
his interest in company and has acquired title 
to advertising agency, TAA Inc., which for- 
merly handled Antell account [B*T, March 
28]. Mr. Kasher plans to act as advertising 
consultant specializing in mail order and "hard 
sell" copy. 

PAUL B. MOWREY, tv consultant, formerly 
with ABC in production, program and sales 
capacities, retained by Zenith Radio Corp. for 
"special activities" in connection with com- 
pany's subscription television program. 

ALBERT W. OBERHOFER, formerly with re- 
tail sales department of Chicago Tribune, ap- 
pointed account executive at Boiling Co., Chi- 
cago, station representative firm. 



RCA Tv Set Sales Run High 

PREDICTING "continued high industry-wide 
level of television set sales," Robert A. Seidel, 
executive vice president, consumer products, 
RCA, reported last Friday that sales of RCA 
Victor television receivers are running ahead 
of 1954 record high. 

Mr. Seidel talked before home furnishing 
conference of National Retail Dry Goods Assn. 
in Washington. He said television will be re- 
sponsible for "the greatest opportunity for in- 
creases in home furnishing sales and profits this 
year, next year, or perhaps any year during our 
lifetime." 

Junius Fishburn Dies at 89 

JUNIUS BLAIR FISHBURN, 89, Roanoke,' 1 
Va., publisher-broadcaster (Times and World- 
News and WDBJ-AM-FM), died Friday, day 
after FCC made final grant of Roanoke's ch. 7 
to WDBJ. Mr. Fishburn was board chairman 
of publishing company. His son, Junius P. 
Fishburn, then president, died March 24, 1954, 
after being stricken during tv hearings in Wash- 
ington. Mr. Fishburn's death Friday brought 
to three number of publisher-broadcasters who 
died last week. Others: Col. Robert McCor- 
mick (Chicago Tribitne-WGN-AM-TV and New 
York News-WPlX [TV]) and Joseph Pulitzer 
(St. Louis Post-Dispatch-KSD-AM-TV) (see 
story page 78). 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 9 



I 



the week in brief 



NBC RADIO MAKES ITS MOVE 

Network unveils 'Monitor,' new week- 
end plan for magazine concept radio 
with 'billboards' as short as six seconds 

27 

STARCH TESTS IN ALTOONA 

Research firm sets up tv commercial 
test laboratory on WFBG-TV there 

28 

TED BATES AGENCY INCORPORATES 

Four top executives change titles in 
business realignment 29 

WOOLWORTH TRIES NETWORK RADIO 

Dime store chain buys Sunday after- 
noon music hour on CBS 32 

TISSUES, TOWELS AND TELEVISION 

The success story that Scott Paper Co. 
has notched in nine years 35 

HOUSEWIVES' PROTECTIVE LEAGUE 

A radio success that sells its adver- 
tisers' products to 15 million families 
each week 38 

WAVE-TV BUYS A FARM 

Louisville station makes a $150,000 
investment in farm programming . .44 

A UNIVERSITY ON FILM? 

Max Wylie reports negotiations be- 
tween Columbia U. and DuMont net- 
work for credit courses on tv 56 

COST CUTTING IN ENGINEERING 

will be the theme of NARTB's engi- 
neering exhibit at the May convention 
59 



departments 



DE-INTERMIXTURE STUDIED 

FCC asks comments on proposal to 
make four markets all uhf 64 

ANOTHER AID TO UHF 

The Commission comes up with a plan 
for low-power uhf boosters 66 

HOUSE APPROVES FCC MONEY 

for investigating economics of radio 
and tv networking. Earmarked: 
$80,000 70 

THE ODDS ARE ON L'HEUREUX 

to get Backer's nod as GOP counsel 
on the Senate's upcoming network, 
uhf-vhf probe 73 

COMR. LEE URGES SELF-POLICING 

He tells Tennessee broadcasters indus- 
try must clean up bad practices to 
avoid government intervention . . . .74 

THE KIDDIE AUDIENCE 

Networks want it. ABC-TV success 
with 'Disneyland' spurs others to re- 
vamp program schedules 82 

AB-PT REPORTS EARNINGS UP 

Although the network division lost 
money, Goldenson says it is reaching 
competitive stage and should show 
gains now 82 

PAY-TV OPPONENTS MUSTER 

New anti-subscription tv organization 
formed. It joins Committee Against 
Pay Tv in hiring Hogan as technical 
counsel for the opposition 85 

RCA ASKS ANTITRUST DISMISSAL 

Manufacturer's answer to Dept. of Jus- 
tice monopoly charge says its licenses 
aid industry growth 86 



Closed Circuit 5 In Review 22 

Editorial Ill International ... 



56 


Networks 


82 


92 


Open Mike 


15 


64 


Our Respects 


18 


22 


Program Services .... 


85 


88 


Programs & Promotion 


91 


27 


Stations 


78 


86 


Trade Associations 


59 



Page 10 • April 4, 1955 



Maury Long 
Vice President 



tig 

Sel Taishoff 
President 

H. H. Tash 
Secretary 



, T. Taishoff 
Treasurer 



BROADCASTING I 
TELECASTING 

THE NEWSWEEKLY OF RADIO AND TELEVISION 

Published Every Monday by Broadcasting 
Publications Inc. 

Executive and Publication Headquarters 
Broadcasting • Telecasting Bldg. 
1735 DeSales St., N.W., Washington 6, D. C. 
Telephone: MEfropolitan 8-1022 

EDITOR & PUBLISHER 
Sol Taishoff 

MANAGING EDITOR 
Edwin H. James 
SENIOR EDITORS 
Rufus Crater (New York), J. Frank Beatty, Bruce Robertson 
NEWS EDITOR 
Fred Fitzgerald 
SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR 
David Glickman 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
Earl B. Abrams, Lawrence Christopher 
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR: Don West 
ASSISTANT EDITOR: Harold Hopkins 
STAFF WRITERS: Ray Ahearn, Jonah Gitlitz, 
Louis Rosenman, Peter Pence. 
LIBRARIAN: Norma Wooton 
EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS: Kathryn Ann Fisher, Eli Fritz, 
Joan Sheehan, Audrey Cappella. SECRETARY TO THE 
PUBLISHER: Gladys L. Hall. 

BUSINESS 

VICE PRESIDENT & GENERAL MANAGER 
Maury Long 
SALES MANAGER 
Winfield R. Levi (New York) 
SOUTHERN SALES MANAGER: Ed Sellers 
PRODUCTION MANAGER: George L. Dant 
TRAFFIC MANAGER: Harry Stevens 
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING: Wilson D. McCarthy 
Eleanor Schadi, M. Gwen Moore. 
AUDITOR-OFFICE MANAGER: Irving C. Miller 
ASSISTANT AUDITOR: Eunice Weston. 
ART-LAYOUT: Duane McKenna 
CIRCULATION & READERS' SERVICE 
MANAGER 
John P. Cosgrove 
Frank N. Gentile, Joel H. Johnston, Sharleen Kelly, 
Jean McConnell, George Neitzey, William Phillips. 

BUREAUS 

NEW YORK 
444' Madison Ave., Zone 22, Plaza 5-8355 

Editorial 
SENIOR EDITOR: Rufus Crater 
AGENCY EDITOR: Florence Small 
ASS'T NEW YORK EDITOR: David W. Berlyn 
NEW YORK FEATURES EDITOR: Patricia Kielty 
NEW YORK ASSIGNMENTS EDITOR: Rocco Fomighetti 
Selma Gersten, Sally Creley 

Business 

SALES MANAGER: Winfield R. Levi 
SALES SERVICE MANAGER: Eleanor R. Manning 
EASTERN SALES MANAGER: Kenneth Cowan 
Dorothy Munster 

CHICAGO 

360 N. Michigan Ave., Zone 1, CEntral 6-4115 
MIDWEST NEWS EDITOR: John Osbon 
MIDWEST SALES MANAGER: Warren W. Middieton 
Barbara Kolar 

HOLLYWOOD 

6253 Hollywood Blvd., Zone 28, Hollywood 3-8181 
WESTERN NEWS EDITOR: Leo Kovner 
TV FILM EDITOR: Marjorie Ann Thomas 

WESTERN SALES MANAGER: Wallace H. Engelhardt 

Toronto: 32 Colin Ave., Hudson 9-2694. James Montagnes. 

SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION 
Annual subscription for 52 weekly issues: $7.00. Annual 
subscription including BROADCASTING Yearbook (53d 
issue): $9.00, or TELECASTING Yearbook (54th issue): 
$9.00. Annual subscription to BROADCASTING • TELE- 
CASTING, including 54 issues: $11.00. Add $1.00 per 
year for Canadian and foreign postage. Regular issues: 
35(i' per copy; 53d and 54th issues: $3.00 per copy. 

ADDRESS CHANGE: Please send requests to Circulation 
Dept., BROADCASTING • TELECASTING, 1735 DeSales St., 
N.W., Washington 6, D. C. Give both old and new 
addresses, including postal zone numbers. Post office 
will not forward issues. 

BROADCASTING* Magazine was founded in 1931 by 
Broadcastting Publications Inc., using the title: BROAD- 
CASTING* — The News Magazine of the Fifth Estate. 
Broadcast Advertising* was acquired in 1932, Broadcast 
Reporter in 1933 and Telecast* in 1953. 

*Reg. U. S. Patent Office 
Copyright 1955 by Broadcasting Publications Inc. 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



/ 



covers the rich 
Southern California 
Television Market 

97% of all the television families in 
the eight Southern California counties 
live where they can watch Channel Five. 



7% of the nation's television homes can be reached by KTLA 

Represented Nationally by PAUL H. RAYMER COMPANY 



April 4, 1955 • Page 11 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 




FROM THE 




1 




IN LANSING, MICHIGAN 



Frankly, we're bubbling over with pride here 
at the Country House ... a pride we'd like to 
share with you, the members of our industry. 
Since the official opening on October 31st, 
thirty-five thousand people have visited our 
new home. If we were to condense the col- 
lective reaction into one word, it would be . . 
"fabulous !" Having been in the advertising 
business for 20 years, we're a bit cautious 
about the word fabulous . . . but we do think 



that our new Country House, with its flowing 
ranch-type exterior and graceful French Pro- 
vincial interior, rates as one of the nation's 
finest plants. Certainly, it has no peer for 
styling, comfort, convenience and utilization. 
We d like you to see it. If your travels this 
year bring you within shouting distance of 
central Michigan, give us a call. We can 
promise you a personal tour and the most 
gracious hospitality. 




W J I M TV 



4 

Coverage that counts! 



N 



@ Lansing (•) Flint @ Saginaw 
(§) Grand Rapids (§) Battle Creek (§) Jackson 

C... CBS ... ABC 




• for family entertainment 

• for weather reports 

• for news 

• for top-notch, top-rated 

shows 

• for advertising results 

• for availabilities, check 
our national reps. The Katz 
Agency 



greater 
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watches 
channel 



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i / / 




the 




station for 62 Tennessee and Kentucky 



counties — a billion dollar market reached by Nash- 



ville's highest towered, maximum powered station 



WLAC-TV 



100,000 watts Channel 5 
CBS Basic Affiliate 
Nashville, Tennessee 



Page 14 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



OPEN MIKE 



No Question Now 

EDITOR: 

. . . Any question I might have had as to the 
power of B # T was certainly cleared up by the 
large number of letters and calls I received 
after the article was published [On All Ac- 
counts, Jan. 31]. 

The response was particularly gratifying, since 
I heard from many old friends whom I had not 
been in touch with in recent years. 

Jerome Feniger 

Cunningham & Walsh Inc. 

New York City 

The Carolinas 

EDITOR: 

I have just received and read with great in- 
terest the story on "The Carolinas" [B*T, 
March 21]. It is apparent that you found plenty 
of grist for the mill. You have treated it well 
and I know the story will be well received . . . 

F. Clifton Toal, Asst. V. P. 

Southern Railway System 

Washington, D. C. 

editor: 

you have told the carolina story thor- 
oughly and ably. favorable comments re- 
ceived from many over the state. 

Joseph M. Bryan 
First Vice President 
Jefferson Standard Life 

Insurance Co. 
Greensboro, N. C. 

EDITOR: 

A 21 -gun salute to Frank Beatty for the 
Carolinas story . . . the whole story was com- 
pletely excellent; you not only got the facts but 
the spirit of the community, and the skillful 
recognition of the three natural divisions should 
cause the state lines to be changed and bring 
about 49 states instead of the present 48. Please 
give me the price for 1,000 reprints. 

B. T. Whitmire, Manager 
WFBC-TV Greenville, S. C. 

EDITOR: 

Congratulations on your fine presentation 
on the Carolinas. I'm a Yankee who has found 
that opportunity in radio went hand in hand 
with tremendous expansion taking place in- 
dustrially and agriculturally. 

Consequently, WHVH, a new station, will 
make its debut in Henderson very shortly. We 
are naturally optimistic, but your article has 
bolstered my confidence 1,000 fold. 

If it is possible, I should like very much to 

obtain several hundred reprints . . . 

George A. Corkum, Gen.. Mgr. 

WHVH Henderson, N. C. 

[EDITOR'S NOTE: Reprints of "The Carolinas" 
are available at $25 per 100 copies, with a 10% 
discount for orders of 1,000 or more.] 

National Vhf Tv Plan 

EDITOR: 

. . . There is no question in my mind but 
that we will soon have small community tele- 
vision. The only way that the present vhf chan- 
nels can apparently be utilized to accomplish 
nationwide television is through making all 
such channels available in all communities of 
these United States. 

If you will check the six local am frequencies 
(1230, 1240, 1340, 1400, 1450 and 1490) I 
believe you will find that about 40% of the 
stations are operating on these frequencies and 
that there is a current move underway for all 
of these stations to be allowed to increase 
their power to 1,000 watts. 

Twelve such local channels or frequencies 



can apparently handle as many television sta- 
tions as radio stations, or as there are radio 
stations presently in existence. The 12 vhf chan- 
nels are presently being handled somewhat like 
the clear am frequencies, which is a situation 
where the best frequencies are actually of least 
value to our people. It is wrong. It will be 
wrong if television is handled in this same 
manner. 

L. C. McKenney, Gen. Mgr. 
KICK Springfield, Mo.; 
KMDO Fort Scott, Kan.; 
KLRS Mountain Grove, Mo.; 
KRMO Monett, Mo. 

No Second Chance 

EDITOR: 

If the title, "Conelrad: No Second Chance," 
rings a bell, it well should. It's the same title 
that appeared on a B«T editorial in the Nov. 
29, 1954, issue. In fact, your editorial in- 
spired the enclosed script [explaining Conelrad 
and its vital significance to every listener] and 
resulted in WJR launching a public service 
project that we consider both educational and 
newsworthy. 

We plan to run this program on WJR each 
day for seven days at different time segments 
so as to cover all components of the WJR 
audience [B»T, March 28]. At the end of this 
first week, tape-recordings of the program will 
be offered to Michigan Civil Defense . . . 

Worth Kramer, Vice President 

WJR Detroit 

Sweeney Exposition 

EDITOR: 

Just read the Kev Sweeney interview [B«T, 
March 28]. It's a fine exposition of radio to- 
day. I'd like five additional copies if you have 
them handy. 

Jim Luce, Chief Timebuyer 
J. Walter Thompson Co. 
New York 

High-Definition Clarification 

EDITOR: 

Thank you very much for the very nice article 
[on a British high-definition system of electronic 
film recording, B*T, March 21]. Due to a mis- 
understanding, it was referred to as the BBC 
high definition system. It also referred to Nor- 
man Collins as a scientist. I would like to 
clarify this portion. 

(a) The system is owned by High-Definition 
Films Ltd., London, and the BBC uses it. 

(b) Norman Collins is a very well-known 
writer and former boss of BBC [television and 
now head of Associated Broadcasting Develop- 
ment Co., one of the four companies author- 
ized to produce programs for commercial tele- 
vision in Britain] . . . 

Allan A. Buckhantz, 

Exec. V. P. 
High Definition Electronic 

Picture Recording System 
Hollywood, Calif. 



Buyer's Book 



EDITOR: 

. . . The Broadcasting Yearbook & Market- 
book will remain on my desk as a reference for 
those facts and figures which a buyer must 
have handy at all times. 

T. E. Malone, Timebuyer 

William Esty Co. 

New York 




MILWAUKEE 



MILWAUKEE'S 



MOST POWERFUL 



INDEPENDENT 



5000 

WATTS 
o n 

1250 



MILWAUKEE'S 



BEST BUY 



LOWEST COST 
PER THOUSAND 



Pulse — Nov.-Dec. 1955 



WEMP WEMP-FM 

MILWAUKEE 

HUGH BOICE, JR., Gen. Mgr. 
HEADLEY-REED, Natl. Rep. 

24 HOURS OF MUSIC, NEWS, SPORTS 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 15 



Measured any way you want 



WFBR 



IS 






IN 



BALTIMORE 



AVERAGE RATINGS 



6 A. M. to Midnight 



Monday thru Saturday 



AND FIRST IN SIX MAJOR TIME 
AND PROGRAM CLASSIFICATIONS 



Page 16 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



Here are the 6 major time ana program 
classifications . . . in whic k WFBR ranks 
FIRST in Baltimore: 



AVERAGE RATINGS-ALL LOCAL PROGRAMS 

6:00 A.M.— MIDNIGHT— MONDAY thru SATURDAY 

WFBR, long known as the Baltimore station famous for its high-rated 
locally produced shows, now takes a commanding lead in this department! 
These are personality shows — designed to carry hard-selling minute 



announcements! 



AVERAGE RATINGS-EARLY MORNING PROGRAMS 

6:00 A.M.-9:00 A.M.— MONDAY thru SATURDAY 




WFBR continues to hold its leadership in the "Wake-Up" department- — 
the most sought-after time segment in radio! The name is "Morning in 
Maryland". 



AVERAGE RATINGS-ALL PROGRAMS-MID-TO-LATE AFTERNOON 
3:00 P.M,-6:30 P.M.— MONDAY thru SATURDAY 

WFBR's musical pattern in this important time segment delivers the 
largest radio audience in town — nearly twice that of soap opera 
competition! We call this one "Melody Ballroom". 

WOMEN'S PROGRAMS 

WFBR's "EVERY WOMAN'S HOUR" is the top women's program in Balti- 
more. It delivers 33-1/3% more audience than its nearest competitor! 

NEWSCASTS 

WFBR's average rating, in quarter hours containing locally produced 
' newscasts, is 45% higher than competitive local newscasts! 

SPORTS PROGRAMS 

WFBR carries the highest rated sports commentary on any Baltimore radio 
station — and this show has been on the air less than 6 months! 

WFBR is hot. How'd you like to have us build a fire under your sales in Baltimore? 

any John Blair man ahout 

WFBR 

5,000 WATTS IN BALTIMORE 

Our president plays *SOURCE: Pulse Metropolitan Area | January-February 

banjo. Rates on request. Report & Out-Of-Home Report J 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 17 




Split your operation. . . . Go into 
competition with yourself. . . . Put all 
salesmen on commission. . . . 
That's what they said when we added 
television to our broadcast service. 
Maybe they were right, but we just 
couldn't change that much. We had 
sales people who had been handling 
the same accounts for five, ten, even 
twenty years— advising those people 
how to get the most for their ad- 
vertising dollar (even when it meant 
diverting a portion to other stations or 
media!) 

We paid regular salaries— no com- 
missions—because we wanted those 
people to live thru the thin so they'd 
be ready to help us cash in on the 
thick. 

We wanted them to keep on advising 
their clients as to how to get the most 
advertising for their dollars— only way 
we saw to keep up radio and get an 
increased appropriation for television. 
Figured we'd be the only loser paying 
two men to have a dog fight over the 
same dollar. 

All we know is that, locally, radio 
income for 1954 exceeded 1953, and 
local television was above radio. 
And everyone of those local adver- 
tisers is getting more than his money's 
worth from our combined broadcast 
service. 

If you "national" boys just follow the 
lead of the home folks who know us, 
you'll also get a real return on your 
dollar and we'll all be happy. 
See Avery-Knodel for TV and Katz 
for radio— it's the only divided part 
of our operation. 

SOUTHEASTERN 
BROADCASTING 
COMPANY 

MACON, GA. 



our respects 

to THOMAS JOSEPH McDERMOTT 



LAST December, Thomas Joseph McDermott, 
conceivably the most even-mannered man in 
advertising, was rewarded with one of the oldest 
designations in the industry: vice president in 
connection with the radio-television department 
of N. W. Ayer & Son, New York. 

Freely translated, the title means that Mr. 
McDermott is the liaison between radio-tv and 
all other departments in the agency servicing 
a particular client. His job is to coordinate the 
advertising plans of the sponsor so that a unity 
of outlook and operation is achieved within the 
separate agency divisions. 

On a particular account, for example, Mr. 
McDermott may sit in and advise on the origi- 
nal storyboard draft of plans, counsel on the 
use of media, assist in the formulation of re- 
search, and in general follow the fortunes of 
the account through every promotional phase 
from copy-theme to timebuying. 

In this work he will work closely with James 
Hanna, longtime vice president in charge of 
radio and television for the agency. 

Few men have ever gone into a new position 
with more goodwill than accompanied Mr. Mc- 
Dermott to his present job. He is one of the 
most revered men in the business. 

A veteran of 21 years at the agency, Mr. Mc- 
Dermott joined N. W. Ayer & Son in 1933 as 
an accountant assisting in the preparation of 
talent contracts in radio. Three years later he 
added timebuying to his duties, purchasing avail- 
abilities for such accounts as Atlantic Refining, 
Cliquot Club, Kirkman & Son, Sheffield Farms 
and the Bell Telephone System. Significantly, 
most of the accounts for which he placed cam- 
paigns then, are still with the agency and are 
using radio or television as important facets 
of their promotion. 

Rising to the post of chief timebuyer, Mr. 
McDermott was simultaneously business man- 
ager of the radio-tv department, the position he 
maintained until last December when he was 
raised to vice presidential rank. 

Possessor of a long line of "firsts" in the in- 
dustry, Mr. McDermott was most recently in- 
strumental in getting Bissel Carpet Sweeper Co. 
to use television for the first time in its history, 
purchasing participations in Home and Today 
on NBC-TV. 

Other N. W. Ayer & Son clients currently 
using radio and television are Dole Pineapple on 
the Art Linkletter show on CBS-TV; Yardley 
Products on the Garry Moore Show on CBS- 
TV; Plymouth cars with News Caravan on 
NBC-TV, plus a spot radio-tv schedule; Na- 
tional Dairy sponsoring Sealtest Big Top on 
CBS-TV; Electric Light & Power Companies 
underwriting the alternate week of You Are 
There on CBS-TV; American Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co. on the Telephone Hour on NBC 




Radio; Atlantic Refining Co.'s extensive sport 
schedule placed regionally and now in its 20th 
year. 

N. W. Ayer, itself, was formed in 1869 when 
advertising was just beginning. Just before the 
turn of the century, the National Biscuit Co. 
and Ayer had a radical new idea — packaged 
foods. At that time, food was sold from bulk 
containers — bins, barrels, tubs and huge sacks. 
For its client, Ayer worked out the first com- 
plete campaign for packaged foods. There was 
a brand named Uneeda Biscuit; a trademark — 
the Uneeda Biscuit boy in his yellow oilskin 
slicker and sou'wester, dramatizing the oil- 
paper protection of the package; there was a 
full scale advertising campaign that swept the 
open cracker barrel from the nation's stores. 
It was a startling overnight success, and adver- 
tising had arrived. 

In 1900, N. W. Ayer was one of the largest 
agencies in the country with more than $2 mil- 
lion dollars worth of business. Today, the 
agency is still among the largest in the country 
with its radio-tv billing alone estimated at $18 
million. 

The Philadelphia agency was also one of the 
first to develop a tv department, which started 
out in 1941. In the middle 40's the agency 
placed for Atlantic Refining the first football 
telecast between Philadelphia, New York and 
Schenectady. 

Ayer opened its branch offices in New York 
in 1903, in Boston in 1905, and in Chicago in 
1910. The Ayer branch office is not a semi- 
independent organization: it is a true branch 
office, closely connected with the home office 
where creative functions and many others are 
centralized. 

Tom McDermott is one member of the New 
York office who helps keep the branch and 
home office in constant contact. 

Mr. McDermott was born in New York on 
Oct. 16, 1908. He attended the local High 
School of Commerce and Pace Institute. He 
majored in accounting at New York U. "Ex- 
actly the right kind of training," he avers, "for 
a man who shoots golf the way I do." 

Dubbed the agency's "worst golfer" he has 
the credentials to prove it. On the wall of his 
office hangs the "Tom McDermott Award" be- 
stowed on him by his colleagues "for outstand- 
ing gallantry in the face of sand, water and 
impenetrable rough." 

As proficient at sailing as he is hapless at 
golf, he has just purchased a 25-foot sloop 
which he plans to launch this summer. 

A widower, Mr. McDermott lives with his 
daughter, Maureen, in Palisades Park, N. J., a 
30-minute drive from his office. Maureen, 23, is 
working in the publicity department of another 
New York advertising agency. 



Page 18 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



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than two million people with twice the 
buying power of the city of Boston, 
twice the retail sales of the city of Pitts- 
burgh ... a growing market, increasing 
at the rate of 2,500 persons per month. 
For your TV dollars your "best bet" is 
KBET — Channel 1 — Sacramento. 




BASIC 




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NEW YORK CHICAGO HOLLYWOOD 
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ATLANTA HOUSTON 




Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 19 



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ENTERTAINMENT 1955 

DEDICATORY programs, as such, are not 
often inherently entertaining. To offset this, 
NBC-TV assembled a disparate crew of top 
entertainers at a cost of some $350,000 to 
launch its $3,700,000 color facilities in Bur- 
bank, Calif. Unfortunately Entertainment 1955 
proved to be a misnomer. 

Accustomed to the network's usual high ex- 
cellence in previous spectaculars, this particular 
effort was disappointing. Even the color, the 
physical transmission of which was steady, 
failed to be exciting. Fred Allen, surprisingly 
enough, looked far healthier than anyone else 
on camera with a consistently human flesh 
tone. Dinah Shore, on the other hand, sported a 
warm, golden tan in person, but looked down- 
right sickly. Either by filter or design, there 
was little use made of the color possibilities in 
costumes and sets. 

The outstanding portion, entertainment-wise, 
was a boy-meets-girl skit starring Pat Carroll 
and Buddy Hackett. It's no mean feat for two 
comparative newcomers to outshine their peers, 
and they were truly delightful. But, then the 
fine hand of Max Liebman guided them in New 
York. It might have been well if Mr. Liebman 
and his showmanship had handled the whole 
show from beginning to end. Something was 
sorely needed to mark such an auspicious event, 
NBC-TV's first color telecast to emanate live 
from the West Coast. 

Helen Hayes, charming as always, presented 
the Antoinette Perry Award for the best Broad- 
way play to "The Desparate Hours," followed 
by an excellently staged and acted scene from 
the play. 

Fred Allen, seemingly quite subdued, was 
the overall host and also took part in a sketch 
with Jimmy Durante, saved only by the latter's 
personality. 

Opera's contribution to entertainment was 
represented by Leontyne Price and Josh 
Wheeler in a scene from "Tosca," which was 
colorless and not up to the version seen previ- 
ously on the network. 

In a simulated recording session, Dinah Shore 
previewed her latest RCA Victor record. A 
rather dismal song titled "Whatever Lola 
Wants," it nevertheless seems destined to be- 
come a hit in the fashion of the day. 

Home viewers and live audience alike were 
cheated of the finale, billed as a singing and 
dancing tour of the new Burbank plant. 
Whether or not it could have proved the saving 
grace of the 90-minute "extravaganza" shall be 
forever left to speculation. 
Production cost: $350,000 for time and talent. 
Sponsored by Sunbeam Corp., through Perrin- 
Paus Co., and Hazel Bishop Inc., through 
Raymond Spector Co., on NBC-TV, March 
27, 7:30-9 p.m. EST, for one time only. 
Starring Fred Allen, Jimmy Durante, Ralph 
Edwards, Adolph Zukor, Bob Hope, John 
Derek, Dinah Shore, Judy Holliday, Cesar 
Romero, the Double-Daters (from Holly- 
wood); Karl Maiden, Nancy Coleman, Helen 
Hayes, Buddy Hackett, Pat Carroll, Leontyne 
Price (from N. Y.). 
Producer-Director: Jack Rayel; Associate Pro- 
ducer: Bob Henry; Directors: Dick McDon- 
ough, Bob Banner (Hollywood); Max Lieb- 
man, Kirk Browning (N. Y.); N. Y. Produc- 
ers: Max Liebman, NBC Opera Theatre; As- 
sociate Director: Roy Montgomery. 
Writer: Charles Isaacs; Musical Director: Gor- 
don Jenkins; Technical Director: Ross Miller; 
Costumes: Grady Hunt; Art Director: Jay 
Krause; Lighting: Al Scarlett; Choreography: 
Nick Castle, Miriam Nelson. 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



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Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 23 




i 



For 

MULTIPLEXING, 
or direct use! 



c. 




RCA's TK-2 I Vidicon Film Camera 
can be used with RCA's Multiplexer, 
TP- II, for multiple picture inputs 
(see illustration opposite page). 
Or, it can be mounted directly on 
any of the RCA TV Projectors- 
such as the TP- 1 6, TP-35, or TP-6A 
(see above). 



1 




film 



DEVELOPED HAND IN HAND with the new RCA-6326 
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picture quality what the RCA Image Orthicon Camera has 
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"Live" picture sharpness! 

For unsurpassed picture detail, choose the RCA Vidicon film 
camera! It's the only film pick-up system with enough signal 
output (and low enough noise in the signal) to use aperture 
response correction. Aperture response correction brings picture 
detail to maximum sharpness (detail resolution, 100% at 350 
lines) while holding a high signal-to-noise ratio. Benefit: You 
produce finer film pictures . . . with a quality you get from 
your studio camera. 

The RCA Vidicon adds "studio" realism to your film pictures. 
The gamma characteristic of the Vidicon tube is ideal for film 
reproduction . . . 0.65, constant over a dynamic range of 150 
to 1. Benefit: You get more realistic film pictures than ever 
before possible. 

The high light sensitivity of the RCA VIDICON film camera 
enables you to reduce projection lamp voltage, reduce heating, 
increase lamp life substantially. 

The RCA VIDICON operates entirely without edge-lighting, 
electrical shading, and any other form of supplemental light- 
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day . . . then this camera virtually runs by itself. 



I VIDICON Camera MI-26021 

I RCA-6326 VIDICON Tube MI-26671 

t Control Chassis Ml- 2606 1 

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I Camera Cable & Connectors MI-26725-AIO 



For the finest TV film reproduction you've ever seen, specify 
an RCA VIDICON film-camera system. Ask your RCA Broad- 
cast Sales Representative for technical details. In Canada, 
write RCA- Victor Ltd., Montreal. 



chain 



4 picture sources 
in multiplexed use 




RCA PIONEERED AND DEVELOPED COMPATIBLE COIOR TELEVISION 



I6MM 
PROJ. 



AUTO 
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An RCA Multiplexer, Type TP- 1 1 allows a single 
Vidicon Camera to accept up to four film picture 
sources — two I 6mm or 35mm film projectors, a TP-3B, 
35mm automatic slide projector, and a Telop II slide 
and opaque projector. The multiplexer is pictured 
above in a multi-input film system using two RCA 
TP-6A professional film projectors. 





More 

North Carolinians 
Listen to 




Than to 
Any Other 
Station* 




* SOURCE: NEILSEN COVERAGE SERVICE 





680 KC 50,000 WATTS 

NBC Affiliate for RALEIGH-DURHAM and Eastern North Carolina 



R.H.MASON, General Manager 
GUS YOUNGSTEADT, Sales Manager 

National Representative 



i 



BROADCASTING 
TELECASTING 



April 4, 1955 Vol. 48, No. 14 



NBC BEGINS MAJOR REVISION 
IN RADIO SELLING, SCHEDULES 

Network plans June 12 start for new round-the-clock weekend sched- 
ule which will be sold under the 'magazine concept.' Run-of-sched- 
ule commercials will be sold in lengths varying from one minute to 
six seconds. Although no change in option time is imminent, affiliates 
will be asked to clear all the time they can for 'Monitor/ the name 
the network has given to the 40-hour program. 



A NEW technique of selling network radio — 
to advertisers and to the public — was unveiled 
last week as NBC lifted the wraps off its radio 
"Operation Redesign" to key affiliates. 

Although details of the plan were not re- 
vealed officially, they were said to have drawn 
the approval of both the Radio Affiliates Execu- 
tive Committee and the Affiliates Study Com- 
mittee. 

They dealt only with the "Weekend" plans 
sketched in broad outline by Executive Vice 
President Robert W. Sarnoff early last month 
[B«T, March 7], and although the network de- 
cided to withhold all the specifics until details 
could be laid before affiliates personally in the 
next few weeks, it was learned that highlights 
included: 

o A program, currently called Monitor, to 
run from 8 a.m. Saturday to midnight Sunday 
night, and to start — tentatively — at 6 p.m. Sun- 
day, June 12. 

• Monitor is to be a continuous program of 
music, news, weather reports, interviews, de- 
bates, audio tapes of tv shows, simulcasts, 
drama vignettes, etc. 

• Sales to be made on the "magazine con- 
cept," in lengths of one minute, 30 seconds and 
"billboards" of six seconds. 

• Although not confirmed, prices were re- 
ported by one source to be pegged at approxi- 
mately $3,000 for 10 six-second "billboards," 
$1,000 for one 1-minute announcement and 
about $700 for one 30-second announcement. 

• Compensation to stations to be altered 
somewhat but to follow generally the present 
pattern on clock-hour basis. Unofficially, one 
source estimated that a major market station 
would receive about $2.50 for a minute an- 
nouncement and 75 cents to $1 for a "bill- 
board." 

The plan is subject to clearance by affiliates 
in each case, because of the departure from 
current sales and compensation methods. But 
both network and affiliate spokesmen, while 
declining to divulge details, maintained that no 
"rate cut" was involved and that compensation 
would be comparable to that paid on today's 
basis. 

NBC President Sylvester L. (Pat) Weaver 
Jr. headed the NBC group who presented the 
plan to the affiliates' representatives last Thurs- 



day, and also went on closed circuit to lay it out 
before the rest of the NBC stations Friday. 

His key aides in making the presentation in- 
cluded Robert Sarnoff, executive vice president 
of NBC, who has assumed command of the ra- 
dio network in addition to his other duties, and 
Charles R. Denny, vice president in charge of 
NBC owned stations and NBC Spot Sales, who 
is credited with a key role in developing the 
weekend program under Mr. SarnofFs guidance. 

While Mr. Denny is expected to have an in- 
creasingly important responsibility in the over- 
all administration of Monitor, James Fleming 
of the network staff is to be designated as 
executive producer. Mr. Fleming put on a 
quarter-hour segment of what one hour of 
Monitor might sound like on the closed circuit 
preceding President Weaver's talk to affiliates 
Friday. 

Even before the closed-circuit presentation, 



affiliates received the following telegram sent 
Thursday by Robert D. Swezey, WDSU New 
Orleans, chairman of the NBC Radio Affiliates 
Executive Committee and of the Study Com- 
mittee: 

"Your executive and study committees today 
went over NBC's new weekend program plan. 
The committees believe the proposal represents 
a forward-looking plan of affirmative action 
and recommends favorable consideration by all 
affiliates. 

"Because of the magnitude of the proposal 
and the need for its immediate implementation, 
a general meeting of affiliates, referred to in 
my memo of March 4, does not appear to be 
desirable at this time. 

"So that you may have full and accurate 
information as promptly as possible, we have 
asked NBC to explain the plan over closed 
circuit tomorrow [Fri.] and follow up with a 
thoroughly detailed report." 

The "follow-up" mentioned by Mr. Swezey 
was understood to mean that NBC plans to 
send men ino the field to discuss Monitor per- 
sonally with each affiliate within the next few 
weeks. 

The discussion with the affiliates committees, 
reports said, did not touch upon NBC's plans 
for "Operation Redesign" as it relates to any 
part of the week except Saturday and Sunday. 

But there appeared to be no doubt that plans 
for the other days would be forthcoming sooner 
or later. One affiliate present at the meeting 
observed: "I'm not naive enough to think they 
won't be coming back with something else if 
this goes." 

Separate negotiations with each affiliate, 




PAT WEAVER CHARLES DENNY JAMES FLEMING 



NBC RADIO'S radical weekend programming ;,>ian, 
outlined to affiliates last Thursday by Mr. Weaver, 
will be in the operational charge of Mr. Denny and 
under the production supervision of Mr. Fleming. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 27 



ADVERTISERS & AGENCIES 



STARCH PLANS TO TEST TV COMMERCIALS 
WITH WFBG-TV IN ALTOONA 'LABORATORY' 

New service will get immediate reactions to television commercials 
from viewer test group in area. Telephone interviews will be used. 



NBC REVISION 




ROBERT D. SWEZEY 

His committee approves 

authorities said, will be necessary to get the 
plan afoot as it relates to station compensation. 
This presumably would be part of the purpose 
of the personal negotiations slated during the 
next few weeks. 

The plan as it now stands, authorities in- 
dicated, encompasses no change — or requested 
change — in option time. But NBC will ask 
affiliates to clear all the time they can for 
Monitor.. 

It also, according to reports, will work out 
periods for local cut-ins and local announce- 
ments at regular intervals, plus five minutes on 
the half-hour for local news which the stations 
may sell as they wish, on either national spot 
or local basis. 

The six-second "billboards" envisioned under 
the plan would be offered to advertisers on the 
basis that they must buy at least 10 — or none. 
The "billboards" would not fall at station 
breaks. 

Rates not only for these but for other lengths 
of commercials are to be set especially for the 
Monitor schedule. 

Advertisers currently using weekend time on 
NBC Radio would not be seriously affected. 
At present these number two on Saturday — 
Allis-Chalmers with National Farm and Home 
Hour on EST stations, and R. J. Reynolds To- 
bacco Co. with Grand Ole Opry — plus partici- 
pants in Great Gildersleeve and Fibber McGee 
and Molly under the "Three Plan." 

NBC's announcement of the new plan noted 
that Executive Vice President Sarnoff in an 
early March speech described the objectives 
this way: 

"What we have in mind is a continuing flow 
of radio entertainment and information begin- 
ning early Saturday morning and running 
around the clock until late Sunday night. It 
will be a service that for the first time wipes 
away the artificial barrier between radio and 
television, and brings the radio listeners ex- 
posure to the great television stars. It will tell 
the news when it happens anywhere in the 
world, from Moscow to Minneapolis; it will 
present live reports from backstage Broadway, 
and famous figures from all fields of endeavor; 
it will include comedy, drama and sports." 

Mr. Swezey presided at Thursday's meeting. 
Attending were the following committee mem- 
bers: 

Executive Committee: R. B. Hanna Jr., WGY 
Schenectady; George W. Norton Jr., WAVE 
Louisville; Harold Essex, WSJS Winston-Salem; 
Paul W. Morency, WTIC Hartford, and Rich- 
ard H. Mason, WPTF Raleigh, N. C. 

Study Committee: Jack Harris, KPRC 
Houston; Walter J. Damm, WTMJ Milwaukee; 
Edwin K. Wheeler, WWJ Detroit, and William 
Fay, WHAM Rochester, N. Y. 

Page 28 • April 4, 1955 



IN A MOVE to test viewer-reaction to televi- 
sion commercials under conditions approaching 
those in the average home, Daniel Starch & 
Co., Mamaroneck, N. Y., has set up a copy- 
testing "laboratory" in Altoona, Pa., in co- 
operation with WFBG-TV Altoona. 

Details of Starch's new copy-testing service, 
under which commercials will be placed on the 
air over WFBG-TV, are being announced to- 
day (Monday) by Jack Boyle, director of tv 
research for Starch. Mr. Boyle said he believes 
that the new service, which ascertains reaction 
to tv commercials from a group of telephone 
subscribers in the Altoona area, represents "a 
truer cross-section sample than is possible in a 
panel group gathered in a single large market." 
In addition he contends it is more economical. 

As outlined by Mr. Boyle, the technique is as 
follows: 

Three commercials to be tested are sched- 
uled within a half-hour segment of a local 
program on WFBG-TV. Commercials may be 
those of one client or three different clients. 
Shortly before the program is to be presented, 
Starch's interviewers in the Altoona area phone 
at random, requesting respondents to listen to 
the program and to agree to answer questions 
by phone at the conclusion of the show. These 
individuals are offered a choice of premiums 
for their cooperation. The usual sample is 100 
men and 100 women, or 200 women. 

The interviewing procedure, according to 
Mr. Boyle, is an adaptation of Starch's regular 
network "immediate recall" studies. In this 
connection, the respondent is asked if he saw 
the commercial, and if not, why not. Those 
who respond affirmatively are questioned (aided 
recall-style): "What was brought out about the 
beverage (toothpaste) (automobile)?" If a pro- 
ductive answer is elicited, the interviewers ask 
the respondents for further comment. All re- 
sponses are reported verbatim, including "don't 
know" and "don't remember." 

The report, which is delivered to a client 




DETAILS of a copy-testing "laboratory" 
at WFBG-TV Altoona, Pa., designed to 
produce a more accurate cross-section of 
the population more economically than 
presently possible are discussed by (I to r) 
George P. Gable, president, WFBG-TV; 
Frank Headley, head of H-R Representa- 
tives; Jack Boyle, Daniel Starch & Co. 



about 10 days later, covers such pertinent points 
as the percent of those who saw the commer- 
cial; the percent who recalled one or more 
sales points; percent of those who did not see 
the commercial; a percentage breakdown of j 
the reasons for non- vie wing of the commercial; I 1 
exact transcript of verbatim responses to ques- [ 
tions, divided as to men and women, and the 
script of the audio and video of the commer- I 
cials. 

Mr. Boyle said field work on a single com- i 
mercial can be started only when two others 
have been ordered by other clients. 

Various cost arrangements have been estab- 
lished by Starch. For instance, $300 will cover 
the cost of 200 interviews on a single com- j 
mercial, including time on WFBG-TV; $750 
for 200 interviews on a half-hour program 
regularly on the station, including cost of local I 
cut-ins, and $850 for 250 interviews on a half- 
hour program carried on film or kinescope for I 
test purposes, including cost of time. Starch is 
able to arrange various types of tests, depend- I 
ing on the clients' requirements. 

Starch already has conducted tests for several I 
advertisers and agencies in its Altoona "lab- ! 
oratory." For one client with a product of 
women's interest, Starch interviewed 200 J 
women, of whom 88.8% recalled the com- | 
mercial, 65.9% responding with one or more 1 
statements about the commercial. Those who 
could not give details of the commercials of- 
fered reasons including: "Left the room" ... I 
"distracted" . . . "not tuned" . . . "don't re- 
member". . . . 

The reasons for selecting Altoona as a test I 
market by Starch, Mr. Boyle said, were varied, j 
but one paramount consideration was that the | 
city ranked fourth in a recent independent i 
analysis among 20 leading test markets on the |j 
basis of 20 selected criteria. Another signif- j 
icant factor, Mr. Boyle added, was "the pro- 
gressive and cooperative attitude" of George P. | 
Gable, president of WFBG-TV. 

Mr. Boyle reported that Starch is working 
out the blueprint of a plan under which a top 
half-hour filmed program would be placed on 
the station in prime time on a 52-week basis, j 
and be supported by vigorous station promo- 
tion. Under these circumstances, he said, the 
program should build up a rating of 20 to 30 ■ 
and could be used for testing without enlisting 
the audience. He said that agencies which have 
heard of the plan have been "uniformly en- 
thusiastic about the possibilities of reproducing 
a completely normal viewing situation for | 
copy testing purposes." 

American Chicle, Whirlpool 
To Buy Some Berle-Ray Shows 

AMERICAN Chicle Co. and Whirlpool Corp. f 

are expected to join Sunbeam Corp. in a three- | 

way sponsorship of the Milton Berle-Martha ij 

Raye show, Tuesdays, 8-9 p.m. on NBC-TV, f 

effective next fall. j 

American Chicle had been sponsoring the 

Sid Caesar Show but moves to Berle-Raye. \. 

Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, New York, is the j! 

agency for American Chicle. Whirlpool Corp.'s jr 

agency is Beaumont & Hohman, Chicago. Sun- ; 

beam announced its sponsorship of one-third of ) 

the program through Perrin-Paus, New York, f 

last week. [B«T, March 28]. j| 

Broadcasting • Telecasting . 



LATEST RATINGS 



NIELSEN 



Two Weeks Ending Feb. 26 (Radio) 
Rank Program 

Evening, Once-a-Week (Average for all Programs) 

1. Amos V Andy (CBS) 

2. Jack Benny Show (CBS) 

3. You Bet Your Life (NBC) 

4. Lux Radio Theatre (NBC) 

5. Our Miss Brooks (Toni) (CBS) 

6. Our Miss Brooks (Amer. Home) (CBS) 

7. Dragnet (NBC) 

8. People Are Funny (Mars) (CBS) 

9. Bergen & McCarthy (CBS) 
10. My Little Margie (CBS) 

Evening, Multi-Weekly (Average for all Programs) 

1. One Man's Family (NBC) 

2. News of the World (NBC) 

3. Amos V Andy (CBS) 

Weekday (Average for all Programs) 

1. Helen Trent (Participating) (CBS) 

2. Our Gal, Sunday (Amer. Home) (CBS) 

3. Helen Trent (Amer. Home) (CBS) 

4. Our Gal, Sunday (Participating) (CBS) 

5. Ma Perkins (CBS) 

6. Guiding Light (CBS) 

7. Young Dr. Malone (CBS) 

8. This Is Nora Drake (B. Myers) (CBS) 

9. Perry Mason (CBS) 

10. Road of Life (CBS) 

Day, Sunday (Average for all Programs) 

1. Adventures of Rin Tin Tin (MBS) 

2. Sunday Gatherin' (CBS) 

3. Galen Drake (8:55) (CBS) 

Day, Saturday (Average for all Programs) 

1. Gunsmoke (CBS) 

2. Robert Q. Lewis (H. Curtis) (CBS) 

3. Robert Q. Lewis (Milner) (CBS) 

Copyright 1955 by A. C. Nielsen Co. 



VIDEODEX 



Homes 
(000) 

(1,238) 
3,669 
3,027 
2,706 
2,706 
2,660 
2,614 
2,522 
2,476 
2,339 
2,247 

(917) 
1,880 
1,789 
1,605 

(1,651) 
2,752 
2,706 
2,660 
2,660 
2,614 
2,568 
2,568 
2,522 
2,522 
2,522 

(550) 
1,467 
1,146 
1,101 

(871) 
2,110 
1,651 
1,513 





Top. Ten Network 


Programs 






Name of Program # of Cities 


% Tv Homes 


1. 


Producer's Showcase 








(NBC) "Peter Pan" 


84 


39.0 


2. 


Dragnet (NBC) 


129 


38.9 


3. 


Jackie Gleason (CBS) 


104 


38.3 


4. 


Toast of the Town (CBS) 


133 


34.7 


5. 


You Bet Your Life (NBC) 


142 


34.6 


6. 


George Gobel (NBC) 


103 


34.3 


7. 


Bob Hope (NBC) 


120 


33.4 


8. 


Disneyland (ABC) 


156 


32.6 


9. 


Robert Montgomery (NBC) 


95 


31.5 


10. 


Tv Playhouse (Sun.) (NBC) 


117 


30.9 




Name of Program # 


of Cities 


# Tv Homes 
(000's) 


1. 


Dragnet (NBC) 


129 


13,010 


2. 


Jackie Gleason (CBS) 


104 


12,039 


3. 


You Bet Your Life (NBC) 


142 


11,451 


4. 


Toast of the Town (CBS) 


133 


11,450 


5. 


Producer's Showcase (NBC) 


84 


11,426 


6. 


Disneyland (ABC) 


156 


11,209 


7. 


George Gobel (NBC) 


103 


11,062 


8. 


Bob Hope (NBC) 


120 


10,528 


9. 


Tv Playhouse (NBC) 


117 


10,070 


10. 


Ford Theatre (NBC) 


169 


10,046 



Copyright Videodex Inc. 
Top Ten Multi-weekly Network Tv Programs 
March 1-7, 1955 



TED BATES & CO. 
CHANGES TO CORP. 

Realignment of officers an- 
nounced. T. L. Bates takes two 
new posts. 

TED BATES & CO. converted from a partner- 
ship to a corporation effective Friday (April 1), 
T. L. Bates, honorary chairman of the newly 
created board of directors and chairman of 
the executive committee, announced last week. 
The name of the agency will be Ted Bates & 
Co. Inc. Thomas F. Harrington becomes chair- 
man of the board; Rosser Reeves, vice chairman 



i. 
2. 
3. 

4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 
10. 



Name of Program 
Howdy Doody (NBC) 
Coke Time (NBC) 
Dinah Shore (NBC) 
Arthur Godfrey (CBS) 
News Caravan (NBC) 
The Big Payoff (CBS) 
Tonight (NBC) 
Perry Como (CBS) 
Strike It Rich (CBS) 
Art Linkletter (CBS) 



% of Tv Homes 
21.1 
16.9 
16.6 
14.8 
14.6 
14.2 
14.1 
13.9 
13.5 
13.4 



Beltone Buys on 'Breakfast' 

TWO 15-minute segments of Breakfast Club 
on ABC Radio will be sponsored by Beltone 
Hearing Aid Co., Chicago, April 18 and April 
25. The firm will sponsor the 9-9:15 a.m. seg- 
ment of the 9-10 a.m. show. The Breakfast 
Club, starring Don McNeill, originates from 
Chicago. Beltone business was placed through 
Olian & Bronner, Chicago. 




MR. REEVES 



MR. K EARNS 



of the board, and William H. Kearns, presi- 
dent. 

The agency was founded by Theodore L. 
Bates in 1940 with two accounts. It has de- 
veloped into one of the nation's leading agen- 
cies, ranking 10th in radio and television bill- 
ing during 1954 with an estimated $27.5 million. 

Other officers of the company are D. Robert 
Parman and Clifford N. Parsells, senior vice 
presidents; Rudolph Montgelas, vice president 
and treasurer; Thomas J. Carnese, vice presi- 
dent and general manager; Alman J. Taranton, 
vice president and secretary; Allen M. Whit- 
lock, vice president and assistant secretary, and 
William A. O. Gross, vice president and as- 
sistant treasurer. 

Other vice presidents include Howard Black, 
Bogart Carlaw, Robert F. Degen, James C. 
Douglass, Clinton S. Ferris, Archibald McG. 
Foster, Richard J. Gay, Joan Geiger, Herbert 
Gunter, E. L. Hill, Mann Holiner, Edward F. 
Hudson, Benson Inge, A. C. Lowitz, John 
Lyden, C. L. MacNelly, Walter McKee, W. L. 
Musser, L. S. Sherrill, Edgar P. Small, and 
T. Neal Wilder. 

Named assistant vice presidents were Howard 
O. Anderson, Courtlandt P. Dixon, William E. 
Hatch, John H. Haight, and C. E. Midgeley. 

Mr. Harrington joined the Bates Agency in 
1944 as account supervisor and member of its 
plans board. Rosser Reeves started with the 
firm in 1940 as one of the original copy super- 
visors in the agency. William H. Kearns joined 
in 1942 as a vice president and has been chair- 
man of the executive committee. 



c c 




Has 


T f NO 



Advance Schedule 
Of Network Color Shows 

CBS-TV 

April 6 (10-11 p.m.): Best of Broad- 
way, "Stage Door," Westing- 
house Electric Co. through 
McCann-Erickson. 

April 14 (8:30-9:30 p.m.): Shower of 
Stars, "Ethel Merman's Show- 
stoppers," Chrysler Corp. 
through McCann-Erickson. 

April 17 (11-11:15 p.m.): Sunday News 
Special, Norwich Pharmacal 
Co. through Benton & Bowles. 



NBC-TV 

April 4 



(7:30-9:00 p.m.): Producer's 
Showcase, "Reunion in Vien- 
na," Ford Motor Co. through 
Kenyon & Eckhardt, and RCA 
through Kenyon & Eckhardt 
and Grey Adv. Agency. 

April 6 (7-7:30 p.m.): Norby, Eastman 
Kodak Co. through J. Walter 
Thompson Co. 

April 9 (9-10:30 p.m.) Max Liebman 
Presents "Merry Widow," Olds- 
mobile Div. of General Motors 
through D. P. Brother & Co. 

April 15 (11 a.m.-12 noon): Home, in- 
sert on fashion, participating. 

April 24 (7:30-9 p.m.): Max Liebman 
Presents, Hazel Bishop Inc. 
through Raymond Spector Co., 
and Sunbeam Corp. through 
Perrin-Paus Co. 



[Note: This schedule will be corrected to 
press time of each issue of B»T.] 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



New ABC-TV Show for L&M # s 

LIGGETT & MYERS Tobacco Co., New York, 
for its L & M filter cigarettes, will sponsor 
Mr. Citizen, a new tv series dramatizing true 
stories of private citizens who, with no thought 
of personal gain or reward, act to help their 
fellow men. The show will start April 20 on 
ABC-TV, Wednesday, 8:30-9 p.m., and will 
be produced by Edward A. Byron. Cunning- 
ham & Walsh, New York, is the agency. 

Lane Joins Lennen & Newell 

THOMAS A. LANE, a vice president and di- 
rector, McCann-Erickson, New York, resigns, 
effective April 15, to 
join Lennen & New- 
ell Inc., that city, as 
senior vice president 
and management ac- 
count supervisor. 

Mr. Lane had been 
with McCann-Erick- 
son for the past six 
years. Previously he 
1 was sales promotion 
I and advertising vice 
1 president of the Rex- 
I all Drug Co. and 

during World War 
MR. LANE . , c 

II was in charge ot 

the national promotion of war bonds. 

April 4, 1955 • Page 29 




ADVERTISERS & AGENCIES 



THE FACTS AND FIGURES 
OF NETWORK ADVERTISING 

P*G, 1954'S RADIO-TV KINGPIN, QUICKENS PACE IN JANUARY 



PROCTER & GAMBLE, which spent $36 
million for radio-tv network time in 1954 
[B«T, March 14], started 1955 at a time- 
buying pace that could shatter its own pre- 
vious year's record. 

According to Publishers Information Bu- 
reau compilations of radio-tv gross billings, 
P & G spent $3,355,856 for radio-tv network 
time last January. For network tv alone, 



P & G paid $2,517,324 and for radio, 
$838,532. The combined figure topped P 
& G's total for December 1954 by $200,000 
and its January 1953 radio-tv expenditure 
by some $650,000. 

Although P & G last January shaved 
$87,295 from its monthly expenditure in 
network radio compared to December 1954, 
it fattened by $288,933 its network television 



ad budget spending for that month. 

Comparing the two Januaries, Chrysler 
Corp. (spending $1 million) and Lever Bros, 
(with $708,344) were new to the top 10 
advertiser listing for tv, replacing P. Loril- 
lard Co. and General Electric. 

Added to radio's top 10 listing were Gen- 
eral Motors Corp., General Mills and Na- 
tional Dairy Products. Replaced were Gen- 




ADVERTISING EXPENDITURES FOR NETWORK TIME, COMPARING 
JANUARY OF 1955 AND 1954 BY PRODUCT CLASSIFICATION 



GROSS TV NETWORK TIME SALES BY PRODUCT GROUPS 
FOR JANUARY 1955 & JANUARY 1954 



LEADING TV NETWORK ADVERTISERS IN EACH PRODUCT 
GROUP DURING JANUARY 1955 



January 1955 


January 1954 


Apparel, Footwear & Access. 


$ 265,276 


$ 343,918 


Automotive, Auto Access. & Equip. 


3,505,780 


2,270,074 


Beer, Wine & Liquor 


501,234 


522,194 


Building Materials, Equip. & Fixtures 


57,634 


67,523 


Confectionery & Soft Drinks 


875,566 


725,186 


Consumer Services 


177,246 


100,008 


Drugs & Remedies 


1,953,835 


1,266,398 


Food & Food Products 


6,864,934 


4,760,619 


Gasoline, Lubricants & Other Fuels 


416,141 


499,380 


Horticulture 


4,746 




Household Equipment & Supplies 


2,888,403 


2,175,314 


Household Furnishings 


245,290 


427,701 


Industrial Materials 


518,938 


453,695 


Insurance 


221,329 


126,966 


Jewelry, Optical Goods & Cameras 


466,737 


256,983 


Office Equipment, Stationery & 






Writing Materials 


588,573 


395,931 


Publishing & Media 


58,356 


19,514 


Radios, Tv Sets, Phonographs, 






Musical Instruments & Access. 


876,456 


761,411 


Retail Stores & Direct by Mail 




42,345 


Smoking Materials 


3,387,749 


3,426,300 


Soaps, Cleansers & Polishes 


3,453,302 


2,412,734 


Sporting Goods & Toys 


13,392 


16,480 


Toiletries & Toilet Goods 


5,817,012 


3,543,830 


Travel, Hotels & Resorts 


51,885 


157,781 


Miscellaneous 


318,460 


284,163 


TOTALS 


$33,528,274 


$25,056,448 



Source: Publishers Information Bureau. 

Page 30 • April 4, 1955 



Apparel, Footwear & Access. 
Automotive, Auto Equip. & 

Access. 
Beer, Wine & Liquor 
Building Materials, Equip. & 

Fixtures 

Confectionery & Soft Drinks 
Consumer Services 

Drugs & Remedies 

Food & Food Products 
Gasoline, Lubricants & Other 

Fuels 
Horticulture 

Household Equipment & Sup- 
plies 

Household Furnishings 
Industrial Materials 
Insurance 

Jewelry, Optical Goods & 

Cameras 
Office Equipment, Stationery 

& Writing Supplies 
Publishing & Media 
Radios, Tv Sets, Phonographs, 

Musical Instruments & 

Access. 
Smoking Materials 

Soaps, Cleansers & Polishes 
Sporting Goods & Toys 
Toiletries & Toilet Goods 
Travel, Hotels & Resorts 
Miscellaneous 

Source: Publishers Information 



Brown Shoe Co. $ 64,613 

Chrysler Corp. 1,187,988 

Pabst Brewing Co. 175,812 

Johns-Manville Corp. 48,555 

Coca-Cola Co. 273,520 
Electric Cos. Adv. 

Program 123,396 
American Home Prod 

Corp. 601,057 

General Foods Corp. 1,039,428 

Texas Co. 170,034 

Noma Lites Inc. 4,746 

General Electric Co. 515,528 

Armstrong Cork Co. 142,320 

U. S. Steel Corp. 122,050 
Prudential Ins. Co. of Am. 96,444 

Eastman Kodak Co. 145,050 

Hallmark Cards Inc. 165,180 

Curtis Publishing Co. 53,914 

Admiral Corp. 190,350 



R. J. Reynolds Tobacco 

Co. 819,037 

Procter & Gamble Co. 2,137,535 

Parker Brothers Inc. 13,392 

Gillette Co. 1,461,245 

Pan Am. World Airways 51,885 

Quaker Oats Co. 120,998 
Bureau 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 







TOP TEN TV NETWORK 




ADVERTISERS IN JAN. 1955 


The accompanying tables are 


1. 


Procter & Gamble 


$2,517,324 


taken from the report of Pub- 


2. 


Gillette 


1,461,245 


lishers Information Bureau on 


3. 


v- uiyuicr UIHIUIIVC 


1 398 169 


advertising expenditures for time 


4. 


Chrysler 


1,187,988 


on the nationwide radio and 


5. 


General Foods 


1,039,428 


television networks during the 


6. 


General Motors 


980,551 


month of January 1955. 


7. 


R. J. Reynolds Tob. 


819,037 




8. 


American Tobacco 


816,966 




9. 


General Mills 


737,871 




10. 


Lever Brothers 


708,344 



TOP TEN RADIO NETWORK 
ADVERTISERS IN JAN. 1955 

1. Procter & Gamble $838,532 

2. Gillette 504,433 

3. General Motors 504,006 

4. Lever Brothers 391,153 

5. Miles Labs 384,026 

6. General Mills 331,167 

7. American Home Prods. 318,870 

8. Colgate-Palmolive 302,471 

9. National Dairy Prods. 275,460 
10. Liggett & Myers Tob. 272,341 



eral Foods, Sterling Drugs and P. Lorillard 
Co. 

In comparing the top 10 listings of Janu- 
ary 1955 with December 1954, the re- 
appearance of General Mills in the tv leaders 
was significant. 

Another interesting development noted in 
the January 1955 listings of the leading 
national advertisers, was a reshuffle in the 



ranking of the top cigarette companies when 
comparing that month with December 1954. 
Although not necessarily a trend toward 
lower radio-tv spending among the tobacco 
firms, it was apparent that none of the top 
tobacco companies had budgeted noticeable 
increases at least for the first month of 
1955. 

P. Lorillard Co., for example, slipped out 



of the radio listing and Liggett & Myers, 
which was 10th in the December tv listing, 
did not appear in January. R. J. Reynolds, 
still placed among the top 10 in tv, but in 
the one month slipped a notch with some 
$300,000 less in tv network gross billing. 
American Tobacco Co.'s monthly tv ex- 
penditure was steady and L & M's figure in 
network radio was down only slightly. 



□ 



ADVERTISING EXPENDITURES FOR NETWORK TIME, COMPARING 
JANUARY OF 1955 AND 1954 BY PRODUCT CLASSIFICATION 



GROSS RADIO NETWORK TIME SALES BY PRODUCT GROUPS 
FOR JANUARY 1955 & JANUARY 1954 



LEADING RADIO NETWORK ADVERTISERS IN EACH PRODUCT 
GROUP DURING JANUARY 1955 



January, 1955 


January, 1954 


Agriculture & Farming $ 


48,740 


$ 92,280 


Apparel, Footwear & Access. 


22,334 


61,010 


Automotive, Auto Equip. & Access. 


822,438 


771,578 


Beer, Wine & Liquor 


73,114 


169,019 


Building Material, Equip. & Fixtures 


7,959 


127,719 


Confectionery & Soft Drinks 


185,836 


233,458 


Consumer Services 


85,257 


165,810 


Drugs & Remedies 


1,374,556 


1,780,167 


Food & Food Products 


2,192,890 


2,758,364 


Freight, Industrial & Agricultural 






Development 


123,775 




Gasoline, Lubricants & Other Fuels 


460,728 


640,665 


Household Equipment & Supplies 


259,362 


334,874 


Household Furnishings 


60,192 


55,213 


Industrial Materials 




92,475 


Insurance 


309,433 


183,650 


Jewelry, Optical Goods & Cameras 


193,084 


130,721 


Office Equipment, Stationery & 






Writing Supplies 


136,049 


83,250 


Publishing & Media 


140,822 


68,804 


Radios, Tv Sets, Phonographs, Musical 






Instruments & Access. 


124,071 


251,497 


Retail Stores & Direct by Mail 






Smoking Materials 


957,268 


1,181,980 


Soaps, Cleansers & Polishes 


1,067,086 


1,282,283 


Sporting Goods & Toys 






Toiletries & Toilet Goods 


1,198,905 


1,904,669 


Travel, Hotels & Resorts 


31,500 


63,228 


Miscellaneous 


909,782 


788,491 


TOTALS $10,785,181 


$13,221,205 



Source: Publishers Information Bureau. 
Broadcasting • Telecasting 



Agriculture & Farming 

Apparel, Footwear & Access. 

Automotive, Auto Equip. & 
Access. 

Beer, Wine & Liquor 

Building Materials, Equip. & 
Fixtures 

Confectionery & Soft Drinks 

Consumer Services 

Drugs & Remedies 

Food & Food Products 

Freight, Industrial & Agricul- 
tural Development 

Gasoline, Lubricants & Other 
Fuels 

Household Equipment & Sup- 
plies 

Household Furnishings 
Insurance 

Jewelry, Optical Goods & 

Cameras 
Office Equipment, Stationery 

& Writing Supplies 
Publishing & Media 
Radios, Tv Sets, Phonographs 

& Musical Instruments & 

Access. 
Smoking Materials 

Soaps, Cleansers & Polishes 
Toiletries & Toilet Goods 
Travel, Hotels & Resorts 
Miscellaneous 

Source: Publishers Information 



Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. $ 42,219 

Exquisite Form Brassiere 22,334 

General Motors Corp. 441,366 

Anheuser-Busch Inc. 73,114 

W. P. Fuller & Co. 7,959 

William Wrigley Jr. Co. 124,883 

American Tel. & Tel. Co. 78,264 

Miles Labs 384,026 

General Mills Inc. 324,646 
Aero Mayflower Transit Co. 1 1 1,691 

Standard Oil Co. of Ind. 106,856 

Philco Corp. 82,271 

Olson Rugs Co. 60,192 
Mutual Benefit Health & 

Accident Assn. 84,776 
Longines-Wittna.uer 

Watch Co. 170,750 
Minnesota Mining & Mfg. 

Co. 68,904 

Curtis Publishing Co. 50,689 

Avco Mfg. Corp. 60,749 



Liggett & Myers Tobacco 

Co. 272,341 

Procter & Gamble Co. 598,819 

Gillette Co. 504,433 

State of Florida 84,776 

C.I.O. 107,546 
Bureau 

April 4, 1955 • Page 31 



ADVERTISERS & AGENCIES 



CBS SIGNS WOOLWORTH 
FOR FIRST NETWORK RADIO 

Dime store chain will sponsor 
hour of music on Sunday after- 
noons, may sell time to manu- 
facturers. 

IN ITS first use of network radio as an adver- 
tising medium, the F. W. Woolworth Co. has 
signed to present The Woolworth Hour, an 
hour-long musical series starring the Percy 
Faith orchestra and chorus, over CBS Radio 
(Sun., 1-2 p.m. EDT), starting June 5 [Closed 
Circuit, March 28]. 

Details of the new program were announced 
last Tuesday at a news reception in New York 
by Rae C. McLaren, vice president of F. W. 
Woolworth Co., and Adrian Murphy, president 
of CBS Radio. 

It was pointed out by CBS officials that The 
Woolworth Hour represents a departure from 
recent trends in network radio in that it will 
be a completely "live" one-hour show and is a 
sale of a one-hour show to a single sponsor. 

A spokesman for Woolworth told B«T that 
although its contract is with CBS Radio, the 
company will attempt to sell announcements 
within the show to manufacturers displaying 
wares in Woolworth stores. He expressed the 
belief that a one-minute announcement would 
cost a participating manufacturer about $1,000. 

The program, with MacDonald Carey as 
host-m.c, will present both popular and classi- 
cal music. It will be produced and directed by 
Howard G. Barnes and broadcast by 202 sta- 
tions of the network. 

Mr. McLaren noted that the program rep- 
resented the company's plunge into network 
radio, and said it was decided that the program 
should be one with "widespread appeal as a 
means of reaching the varied type of people 
that patronize Woolworth's." He explained that 
"music is, of course, a universal language, and 
the artists who will appear on this program 
speak it most eloquently." 

Mr. Murphy expressed the view that the 
program "will win a large and appreciative 
audience and that this, in turn, will be reflected 
in its sales results." He added that The Wool- 
worth Hour will capitalize on the many mil- 
lions of out-of-home listeners, at car radios, 
portables at beaches and summer resorts and 
many other areas of listening. 

Texaco Buys 726 Newscasts 
To Run April-Nov. on ABC 

PURCHASE by the Texas Co. of 726 five- 
minute week-end newscasts to run over a 33 
consecutive week period was announced last 
week by Charles T. Ayres, vice president in 
charge of ABC Radio. The account was placed 
by the Kudner Agency, New York. 

The 33-week order was placed under ABC 
Radio's "Week-end News Package" plan and 
will consist of 22 Texaco News Reporter broad- 
casts every weekend from April 16 through 
Nov. 27 over the full network. The newscasts 
will be handled by such newscasters as Milton 
J. Cross, Charles Wood, Arthur Van Horn, 
Bill Spargrove and Don Gardiner. 

The Texas Co., an ABC Radio spokesman 
said, plans to launch a special nationwide pro- 
motion campaign to call attention to the Texaco 
News Reporter broadcasts. The campaign will 
include three-color stand-up cardboard signs, 
measuring 30 by 40 inches, to be distributed to 
Texaco stations; full-size posters for use in 
window and lobby displays at ABC Radio sta- 
tions, and on-the-air announcements, newspaper 
ads, publicity stories and photographs. 



Deere Likes Tv 

TELEVISION has proved so satisfactory 
in reaching rural audiences that Deere 
& Co., makers of tractors and farm imple- 
ments, has authorized the production of 
a schedule of 27 one-minute tv films for 
its dealers. 

Release of the commercials was an- 
nounced by Reid H. Ray Film Industries 
Inc., which has produced Deere sales and 
advertising films for the past 19 years. 
The spots cover the full Deere line. 



MATTHEWS, NIELSEN V. P., 
DEFENDS RADIO RATINGS 

Chief of research firm's west 
coast radio operation says ra- 
dio is still a vibrant medium. 

RADIO is still a vibrant medium, as proved 
by the fact that it still moves merchandise, 
Joseph R. Matthews, vice president in charge 
of the west coast radio operation, A. C. Niel- 
sen Co., said last week. 

Mr. Matthews, who is based at Menlo Park, 
Calif., was interviewed by BoT during a client 
servicing trip to Hollywood. Recent radio 
station discontent with NSI ratings [B*T, 
March 14, et seq.] had nothing to do with the 
Hollywood trip, he emphasized, adding, "this 
is not a fire-fighting operation." 

The NSI survey is as accurate as possible 
under the circumstances, Mr. Matthews noted. 
"If a higher degree of accuracy is desired, it 
could be obtained, providing the bill could be 
footed, by either of two methods: replacement 
of some Audilogs by additional Audimeters 
and/or an increase in sample size." 

"However," he said, "any appreciable reduc- 
tion of an already small probable error would 
not justify the cost." 

The present Los Angeles sample is an ac- 
curate cross section, he declared without quali- 
fication, pointing out that 281 homes measured 
in Los Angeles NSI ratings is the largest sample 
offered by any service in the area, if the fact 
that the homes are measured more than once 
is considered. 

"I will admit a degree of error exists when 
anyone starts sampling," the Nielsen represen- 
tative observed, "but I will not admit the Los 
Angeles sample or any information received 
from Audimeter homes represents an error." 

He further disclosed that during his current 
Los Angeles trip, one radio and one tv station 
had become NSI subscribers. Additionally, he 
noted that of the top 10 national agencies, in 
radio-tv billings, seven are NSI subscribers, 
with two having become so recently. 

Esty to Produce 'Comedy Hour' 

COLGATE-PALMOLIVE Co., effective June 
5, will switch the production chore of the Col- 
gate Comedy Hour from its agency Ted Bates 
& Co., New York, to William Esty & Co., New 
York. 

Ted Bates announced the switch in a state- 
ment that said "in a re-alignment of network 
television responsibilities, the NBC-8-9 p.m. 
Sunday night period, for the past year handled 
by Ted Bates & Co., has been assigned to 
another Colgate agency. 

"Ted Bates & Co., which has been handling 
all of Colgate's nighttime television program- 
ming, will continue to produce The Millionaire 
on CBS-TV Wednesday nights." 



ADVERTISER ANALYSIS 
REFLECTS TV'S GAINS 

Four-medium compilation pub- 
lished by Leading National Ad- 
vertisers shows expenditures 
in 1954 as compared to the 
preceding year. 

ADVERTISERS, which last year again spent 
more than $1 billion for time on radio and tv 
networks and space in magazines and Sunday 
newspaper supplements, increased their national 
tv expenditure by some $92.5 million. 

This information is revealed in the seventh 
annual edition of National Advertising Invest- 
ments, published by Leading National Adver- 
tisers, and showing, by company and product, 
advertising expenditures in 1954 for each me- 
dium for all companies spending $25,000 or 
more. 

Network tv time charges were $320,154,274, 
according to the edition which said, the $92.5 
million gain in one year was an all-time national 
record for the medium. Highest previous net- 
work tv jump was $87 million recorded between 
1951 and J950. Other highlights of the publi- 
cation: 

Four-medium total for the year was $1,134,- 
493,175, up 7% over the 1953 total of $1,062,- 
549,992. Only other medium to gain was maga- 
zines, a slight $1 million compared to its $46.3 
million increase registered between 1953 and 
1952. Last year's magazine total: $604,121,055. 
Sunday newspaper supplements, which had 
registered a gain of $12.9 million between 1953 
and 1952 was down about $800,000 for a 1954 
total of $72,576,677. Radio networks dropped 
$23 million, or 14%, for a 1954 total of $137,- 
641,169. 

All-Media Audience Study 
Being Developed by ARF 

AS PART of the Advertising Research Founda- 
tion's All-Media Audience Study, subcommit- 
tees already are at work to develop a design 
for an audience study of magazines which can 
be integrated with plans for audience studies of 
other media, Fred B. Manchee, BBDO, chair- 
man of ARF's board of directors, has reported. 

Mr. Manchee said audience concepts are be- 
ing examined in an attempt to arrive at a defi- 
nition, or definitions, of audience which will 
be more meaningful to the advertising industry 
and which can be applied to all media. The 
committee in charge of the project is headed 
by Dr. Lyndon O. Brown, Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample. 

At the same time, Dr. W. H. Wulfeck, Wil- 
liam Esty Co., chairman of ARF's Motivation 
Research Committee, disclosed that his group 
has asked the ARF board to allot additional 
funds for his committee to further a "Buying 
Decisions Study" that it "inherited" from Na- 
tional Analysts. 

This study, he said, "will attempt to find 
out how consumers actually make purchasing 
decisions, who makes them, and how quickly; 
this is not a measure of advertising effective- 
ness, although advertising, of course, is one 
of the elements which goes into the making 
of buying decisions." 

Noting that the committee has been enthusi- 
astic about the new techniques developed in 
the study, Dr. Wulfeck said the study encom- 
passes a product profile "as it exists in the 
minds of buyers;" the "dynamics of intra- 

(A&A continues on page 52) 



Page 32 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 




Getting bigger 
and BIGGER! 



B 



ACK in March, 1954, when the Iowa Radio-Television 
Audience Survey was taken, 56.9% of all homes in 
this State had television sets — one-fourth of which 
had been purchased less than six months previously. 

Today, we estimate that WHO-TV has coverage 
of a minimum of 302,000 sets in Central Iowa — 
owned by 566,300 city people, 545,100 rural people. 

WHO-TV's Audience is getting bigger and bigger. 
Free & Peters have latest facts. 





WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
(WHO 
WHO 
'WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
<WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
WHO 
— WHO-TV 

WiO-W 

Channel 13 • Des Moines • nbc 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 
P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 
Free & Peters, Inc. 
National Representatives 





TlNITY H A0^4t^ ! A 




"OPERATION DIPLOMAT" 

~ that could Tr 'W er 
lyjjh^- tbe Srd World War , 


"HOUSE OF BLACKMAIL" 

"~" Woman in Terror! 


"FINAL APPOINTMENT" 

r^yCji -a Maniac at Large 
Caught in a Dragnet I 


"THE BLUE PARROT" 

c CRQ§^ " ,ts Underworld 
gOUSi^ "^Mystery and Murder! 


"DANGEROUS CARGO" "THIS WAS A WOMAN" 

^.Q^AjEi — for a Million- ^ _ the Mental Horrors 
Bucks they'd Murder/ of a Poisoned Mind!* 


"CLUE FROM A CORPSE" 

R ^gSi^- —Battered Bodies 
\S0^ieaoe a Trail of Death! 


, "PROFILE" 

FUR^- — a ^ iant f or P 0U)er 
"■""^ in the Publishing Racket.' 


"MEN AGAINST THE SUN" 

— ^ — Stalk Jungle Hunters! 


"MURDER IS NEWS" 

THRILLS! — Oaring Private-eye 
lH-— soloes Jewel Stick-up! 


"BURNT EVIDENCE" 

EXPOSE' — Lifting the Lid on 
— " " the Insurance Racket.' 


"PRIVATE INFORMATION" 

I^YSTER^- — Death Answers the 
— "phone and Threatens Murder! 


A %'L"THE GOLDEN UNK" 

*%^g«gi3@^ ^URgEEi — with a Broken Chain of Evidence 




13 • ALL HEW FIRST RUN FEATURE FILMS FOR J)f • 



c 




EXCLUSIVELY DISTRIBUTED BY 



UilSlX ************* 



1501 B'way, New York 36, N.Y. ★ 8951 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 46, Calif. 
LOngacre 4-8234 CRestview 4-5693 



* it A 

* § 



Page 34 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting o Telecasting 



TISSUES, TOWELS 
AND TELEVISION 



SCOTT PAPER CO. PUTS HALF ITS BUDGET INTO TV 



ENTERING its ninth year in television, the 
Scott Paper Co., world's largest manufac- 
turer of commercial paper products, is cur- 
rently spending an estimated $3 million — 
half of its entire advertising budget — in the 
visual medium. 

The "television years" have been the pe- 
riod of the company's greatest growth in 
sales, until today its merchandising figures 
stand at the highest level in the history of 
the organization. 

A veteran in television, Scott entered the 
medium locally in 1947 with the Dione 
Lucas cooking program on WNBT (TV) 
(now WRCA-TV) New York. In 1951 the 
company bought its first network show, My 
Little Margie, a family situation-comedy 
series on NBC-TV, and will continue that 
sponsorship through this summer. As of 
Aug. 31 it will put Father Knows Best into 
the Wednesday, 8:30-9 p.m. time spot now 
occupied by Margie. 

A year later, in the fall of 1952, casting 
about for a new program "consistent with 
the stature of the firm and the quality of its 
products," Scott enrolled as one of four 
subscribers on Omnibus, the prestige pro- 
duction of the Ford Foundation Television 
& Radio Workshop, aired on 82 CBS 
stations. 

This "quality blending" of program and 
product proved so successful as a promotion 
maneuver that Scott renewed its identifica- 
tion with the show in 1953 and 1954. 

George M. Benson, executive associate of 
Ford Foundation, told B»T that Scott Paper 
Co. has introduced two new products on 
Omnibus: Scotkins and Scotties, both of 
which have been quite successful. 

Acutely responsive to the special "demon- 
stration" opportunities of television as a 
selling medium, the Scott company has pur- 
sued the technique to its fullest advantage. 
For Scotties, a facial tissue, they have dra- 
matically exposed the product on the air to 
a jetting stream of tap water to show its 
exceptional resistibility to pressure. With 
Cut-Rite, a waxed-paper wrapping, they 
used comparable devices to demonstrate the 
adaptability, effectiveness and convenience 
of the product. The same pattern of com- 
mercial was used for ScotTowels to drama- 
tize its versatility and promote new uses. 

In addition to network television, the firm 
has several radio and television spot sched- 
ules in various parts of the country. These 
schedules support special regional activities 
such as new product introductions. 

Alert to the complex uses of advertising, 
Scott is currently conducting its own re- 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



search in an effort to evaluate the relative 
weight of the various promotional elements 
contributing to their overall success. Tele- 
vision, they have no doubt, is a significant 
factor in that success. 

"In fact, judging from the mail," John 
Hirst, radio-television manager, told B»T, "it 
appears that Omnibus has one of those loyal, 
appreciative and responsive audiences which 
deserves far more credit than quantitative 
measurements permit." 

The net sales of finished Scott paper prod- 
ucts in 1953 were $149,262,335. Total net 
sales, including pulp, amounted to $165,- 
000,729. Net paper sales for 1952 were 
$129,168,565 and total net sales including 
pulp were $146,902,536. Net income for 
the year was $11,695,383 compared with 
1952's figure of $10,707,346. 

The Scott Paper Co. was established al- 
most three-quarters of a century ago by two 
brothers, Clarence and E. Irwin Scott, who 
owned a small paper jobbing establishment. 
The brothers delivered the paper products 
themselves in a small pushcart. Shortly after 
the new company had been formed, the 
brothers recognized one of the important 
social trends of the time — the increased use 
of toilet tissue to keep pace with the fast- 
growing acceptance of sanitary plumbing. 
They therefore decided to confine their ef- 
forts in the manufacturing of toilet tissue. 
It meant merely the conversion of "parent 
rolls" purchased from paper manufacturers 
into consumer size products for the many 
customers who sold the rolls under their own 
trade names. 

Just before the turn of the century, Ar- 
thur, the only son of E. Irwin Scott, entered 
the business and brought with him three 
fundamental business principles: (1) to 
make just a few products of the highest 
quality; (2) to make them as inexpensively 
as possible, and (3) to tell the public about 
them through advertising. These three con- 
joined policies provided the keystone on 
which has been built the largest business of 
its kind in America today. 

In keeping with the new philosophy, the 
first objective was to discontinue some 2,000 
private label brands in favor of a few of 
the company's own. With the acquisition of 
the brand name "Waldorf" these few Scott 
products soon formed what came to be 
known as "The Sanitary Line." 

In a short time this group of favored 
products was further augmented when the 
first paper-towel was developed. The Scot- 
Tissue towel, as it was ultimately named, 
came into being largely by chance. The 




A COMMERCIAL for Scotkins, designed 
to demonstrate strength of the product. 

ingenuity of a Philadelphia school teacher, 
who had cut sheets of paper into convenient 
squares to replace the common cloth towel, 
presented a use for a carload of paper which 
was so heavy and thick that it could not be 
converted into toilet tissue. The superior 
quality of ScotTissue towels soon com- 
manded an increasing consumer preference. 

The panic of 1907, despite the hardships 
imposed on the growing business, served 
only to intensify the faith of the young man- 
agement in Arthur Scott's three simple busi- 
ness fundamentals. Up to that time, manu- 
facturing was still confined to "conversion" 
activities, but the need for better quality 
control and increased production prompted 
the company to take its first step into the 
future. 

In an old soap mill, at the site of the 
company's present main plant and executive 
offices in Chester, Pa., two cylinder-type 
machines were installed — antique in design 
and operation as we regard paper machinery 
today. These served, nevertheless, as the 
backbone for today's 10 modern producing 
giants in the Chester plant, including the 
largest paper towel machine in the world. 

Scott, with home plant and administrative 
offices at Chester, Pa., also owns finishing 
plants at Hoboken, N. J., and Sandusky, 
Ohio, and a pulp mill supported by extensive 
timber holdings at Everett, Wash., and two 
paper machines in a mill at Milford, N. J. 
Officers are Thomas B. McCabe, president, 
and Raymond C. Muteer, executive vice 
president. 

The company's products include ScotTis- 
sue, Waldorf, Soft-Weve toilet tissue, Scot- 
ties and Cut-Rite, ScotTowels and Scotkins. 

April 4, 1955 • Page 35 




It's Spring, and NBC Radio is growing everywhere you look! 

Growing new business, for example. During the past season, NBC 
Radio signed up $16,116,000 in new business — a 165% new-billings 
increase over the previous season. Fifty sponsors are making sure, 
through new time buys, that their advertising bears a cash crop. 

The reason? New programming ideas and sales patterns in NBC 
network radio — like the Mary Margaret McBride and Dr. Norman 
Vincent Peale morning strip shows, the widely acclaimed Biographies 
in Sound, and the exciting new concepts to be unveiled shortly. All 
of them represent a creative approach to radio as a modern medium, 
filling a special and vital role in people's lives. 

Yes, it's Spring at NBC, and things are stirring. It's a time 
of growth, of vitality and movement. 

Need a Spring tonic? 

Exciting things are happening on 

JJH Radio 

a. service of (RC/j) 




Companies making 
new investments in 
NBC Network Radio 
during '54 -'55 season: 

Allis-Chalmers 
Manufacturing Company 

Allstate Insurance Co. 
American Dairy Association 
American Motors Company 
Armour & Company 

Buick Motor Division, 
General Motors Corporation 

Brown & Williamson 
Tobacco Corp. 

Calgon, Inc. 

Carter Products, Inc. 

Coast Fisheries 

Crosley Division, 

AVCO Manufacturing Corp. 

Crow ell -Collier 
Publishing Company 

Curtis Publishing Company 

D'Con Company, Inc. 

Dodge Division, 
Chrysler Corp. 

Doeskin Products Inc. 

Frawley Manufacturing Co. 

General Foods Corporation 

General Motors Corporation 

Gillette Safety Razor Co. 

Harian Publishing Co. 

Hudnut Sales Co., Inc. 

Kiplinger Washington 
Agency, Inc. 

Lever Brothers 

Lewis Howe Company 

Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 

Mars, Inc. 

Merit Plan Insurance Company 

Miles Laboratories, Inc. 

Mytinger & Casselberry, Inc. 

Nash-Kelvinator Corporation 

Oldsmobile Division, 
General Motors Corporation 

Pharmaco, Inc. 

Plymouth Motor Corp., 
Division of Chrysler Corp. 

Q-Tips, Inc. 

Radio Corporation of America 

Reson Sales 

Rexall Drug Co. 

Rhodes Pharmacol Co., Inc. 

The Murine Company, Inc. 

The National Life & Accident 
Insurance Co., Inc. 

The Prudential Insurance 
Company of America 

The Quaker Oats Company 

The Texas Company 

The Toni Company, 
Division of the Gillette Co. 

The Travelers Insurance Co. 

Vitamin Corporation of America 

W. P. Fuller & Co. 

Webster Products 

White King Soap Co. 






PHILIP STEVENS 

KMOX 



LEWIS MARTIN 
war 



JAMES TAYLOR 

WGAR 



THE 



By Leo Kovner 







MARK EVANS 
WTOP-WRVA 



MORGAN BAKER 

WEEI 



ALLEN GRAY 
wcco 






GALEN DRAKE 

WCBS 



JOHN TRENT 
WCAU 



PAUL GIBSON* 

WBBM 





PHIL NORMAN 
KNX 



'Picture never published. 



GRANT WILLIAMS 
KSL-KIRO 




LEE ADAMS 

KCBS 



AN INSISTENCE on sound, believable ad- 
vertising on its programs, plus an ad lib, 
just-between-us delivery, has won for CBS 
Radio's Housewives' Protective League a 
unique spot in broadcasting annals. 

Besides paying off handsomely — the prop- 
erty grosses approximately $3 million a year 
and its programs reach a national audience 
estimated at about 1 5 million families weekly 
— HPL has proved that in practice as well as 
in theory "the program that sponsors the 
product" (that's HPL's slogan) pays off in 
favorable and sometimes almost fantastic 
low-cost success stories for advertisers. 

Now well into its 21st year on the air, 
HPL has regional programs in 14 U. S. 
markets and has ventured tentatively into 
television on Washington's WTOP-TV. The 
television program, however, is not actually 
a part of the vast and prosperous HPL do- 
main, which is firmly rooted to an aural 
audience. 

Today, Housewives' Protective League is 
a program service of CBS Radio, the net- 
work having purchased it from founder 
Fletcher Wiley in 1947. Starting in 1934, 
Mr. Wiley nursed the program along from 
its infancy on the then independent KNX 
Los Angeles through its expansion to four 
markets. And the program idea he came up 
with made him a wealthy man; he sold his 
four-market package to CBS for a million 
dollars and is now retired, owner of two 
west coast ranches and other property. 

Shortly after it was acquired by CBS, 
Edward W. Wood Jr. was brought in as 
HPL's sales manager. In 1950 Mr. Wood 
assumed the position of general manager as 
well, and during his tenure has witnessed 
HPL's growth to a 14-station, major-market 
operation. 

It Started Small 

It wasn't always a big operation, however. 
When Mr. Wiley first approached KNX with 
his idea, he had no previous radio experi- 
ence to offer along with his services. He 
had started as a California food broker — 
which may account partially for the fact that 
HPL programs run so strongly among food 
advertisers — and also had attained consider- 
able experience in a variety of other fields. 
Nonetheless, despite his lack of radio back- 
ground, he sold his idea to KNX and to try 
it out was assigned six half-hours a week. 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



HOUSEWIVES' PROTECTORS 



EVERY WEEK THEY TELL IS MILLION FAMILIES WHAT TO BUY 



All sustaining, of course, and with no salary. 

Basically, all HPL programs today are the 
offshoot of those first trials in Los Angeles. 
First, the program is talk, tailored to the 
tastes of the area in which it is heard. 
Aimed at the housewife, the delivery is 
casual, chatty and personalized. To insure 
this effect, no written copy is used on the 
program, merely a number of notes which 
I act as a spur to the commentator, remind- 
! ing him of the main topics he is to touch 
upon and listing the participating advertisers 
I scheduled for the day. The ban on written 
copy is extended to the commercials, too, 
with an additional prohibition on transcribed 
announcements and singing commercials. 

'Ad Lib' Commercials 

This rule has always been in effect, With 
the individual commentators building the 
commercials ad lib. Consequently, each 
commentator is obliged to know the products 
he sells inside-out. While some accounts 
have been lost because of the prepared copy 
ban, the genuine familiarity of the broad- 
caster with his products and his authorita- 
tive, though off-hand, manner of recom- 
mending it to listeners lends HPL advertis- 
ing a special distinction, and is probably 
responsible in large measure for its sales 
records for its advertisers. 

Another major ingredient of the House- 
wives' Protective League success story is the 
honesty of the program's advertising, backed 
by rigid testing through HPL "testers' bu- 
I reaus," which insures that all products rec- 
ommended by HPL broadcasters are exactly 
as represented. Members of these testers' 
bureaus are volunteers, recruited from 
among listeners in each program area. Lis- 
teners submit regular application forms to 
become bureau members, listing their hob- 
bies, pets, family information and other 
pertinent data. In a typical area, the bureau 
I consists of 3,500 members and a particular 
j testing panel is made up of about 100 
, members. Each member of the testing panel 
| is given a sample of the product at the 
j manufacturer's expense. In return, the 
I panel tests the product in their homes over 
a period of time, fills out a mimeographed 
I questionnaire and returns it to the local HPL 
| director. 

A sample of the questions asked includes: 



How does this product compare with others 
of its type? Is it worth the money? Does it 
do what it says? Does it do more? Less? 
If it does what it says, is it worthy of the 
Housewives' Protective League? 

At least 80% of the replies must be favor- 
able before HPL will consider accepting a 
product as a sponsor of the program. Even 
with such approval, for certain products 
and services the HPL staff institutes further 
checks with such groups as Better Business 
Bureaus to insure that advertising claims are 
accurate and product performance honestly 
represented. 

In HPL's earlier days, the percentage of 
rejections was fairly high. However, with 
the growth of the program's reputation for 
unswerving integrity, this percentage has 
fallen off considerably. An occasional pitch- 
deal operator approaches the program even 
today, sometimes offering an under-the-table 
inducement in an attempt to reach the lush 
pastures of an HPL endorsement. He never 
succeeds. 

Not only are pitch deals never considered 
for endorsement, but some products which 
are widely accepted in other ethical broad- 
casting circles do not receive HPL approval. 
These include cigarettes, beers and wines, 
and any product making medical claims. 
There is no objection, personally or edi- 
torially, to many of these products, but the 
feeling in HPL management is that some 
products can't be tested adequately and 
others just don't belong on a program aimed 
at the heart of the home. 

A Dairy Did It 

In the early days, too, the determination 
to maintain the standards which are part 
and parcel of today's HPL program service 
almost brought the whole show a-cropper. 
Fly-by-night outfits with a keen eye for a 
fast buck were quick to seek out HPL spon- 
sorship, but legitimate advertisers weren't 
about to try out a new program idea. HPL 
was in the untenable position of having lots 
of takers who were undesirable but no one 
who fitted either its high standards or its 
program format. The KNX management 
was about to scrap the whole business when 
Golden State Co., a San Francisco dairy 
with statewide distribution, came through 



with a two-week participation. When Golden 
State received 8,000 write-in replies in a pro- 
motion for new sales leads, the firm ex- 
tended its participation for an additional 
19 months. And HPL was made. 

Since then, the story of HPL has been 
one of steady growth, both in gross billings 
and its expansion into other markets. The 
original success story of Golden State has 
been augmented by others that would make 
any advertiser's mouth water. And HPL's 
list of participating advertisers today reads 
like a Who's Who of regional and national 
accounts and numbers some 140 sponsors 
from A-l Sauce to Zippy Starch. 

WGAR's the Newest 

CBS Radio affiliate 50 kw WGAR Cleve- 
land is the most recent to tie-in with HPL, 
bringing the HPL lineup to 14. (All HPL 
stations are CBS stations — some CBS owned, 
some affiliates — and all but one are 50,000- 
watters.) Each of the local programs oper- 
ates in a semi-autonomous fashion, respon- 
sible only to New York headquarters. Gen- 
eral Manager Ed Wood keeps a firm hand 
on the HPL activities in each market by 
circuiting the stations at regular intervals, 
having HPL director-broadcasters visit his 
staff in New York, and by generally helm- 
ing all important policy decisions as well as 
covering the day-to-day desk chores at- 
tendant to the job. And it's no small task 
when the stations and their markets are 
considered. They are: WEEI Boston, WBT 
Charlotte, WBBM Chicago, WGAR Cleve- 
land, KNX Los Angeles, WCCO Minne- 
apolis-St. Paul, WCBS New York, WCAU 
Philadelphia, WRVA Richmond, KMOX St. 
Louis, KSL Salt Lake City, KCBS San Fran- 
cisco, KIRO Seattle and WTOP Washington. 

On each station, the Housewives' Pro- 
tective League programs are headed by a 
director-broadcaster who is literally what 
the combination title suggests. He directs 
HPL activities in his area and he is the com- 
mentator on the air. Although the size of 
the secretarial and merchandising staff varies 
from market to market, each director has 
such a staff available. 

There is a remarkable similarity in the 
delivery of each of the directors. Of course 
it's not accidental; they are trained in the 
HPL tradition and carefully screened before 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 39 





we feel like we swallowed th 




5I.O 



* 





ABBOTT 



' r 



PRESTON 
FOSTER 

WATERFRONT 

The top-rated of all shows, local and 
network, in Houston-Galveston (nation's 
16th biggest consumer market)... where 
it's racking up sales for Sears Roebuck. 
In Philadelphia: A smashing 32.2* rat- 
ing and top-rated non-network Vi-hour 
film show! 65 taut films. 

•ARB, Jan. 1955 — Houston and Philadelphia 




AND 




COSTELLO 



III Nl 



In Cleveland (nation's 6th biggest con- 
sumer market), a chunky 23.5 for 
Chunky Chocolates, putting it right up 
in the "top ten". They're a scream in 
New York, too — with a 14.6** and 3rd 
highest ranking among all non-network 
Vi-hour film shows. 52 rollicking films. 

* ARB, Dec. 1954 — Cleveland 
** ARB, Feb. 1955 — New York 



WIRE, PHONE OR WRITE YOUR 
NEAREST MCA-TV OFFICE TODAY 
FOR AUDITION PRINTS 




III ill 




And we've got a score more just like these — syndicated film hits 
that are snaring No. 1 ratings wherever played. For fop ratings, 

big-time stars, solid merchandising support, you can't beat 
MCA-TV shows ... because they're beating everything in sight! 





31.9 



CHARLES 
BICKFORD 




THE BADGE 



All new, all first run, but the same ter- 
rific series that scored top ratings (like 
that 31.9 in Boston) on its network run 
last summer. "Realistic ... Bickford ex- 
cellent" (Variety). 39 fast-paced dramas. 

* ARB, June 1954 — Boston 



THERE'S AN MCA-TV SHOW FOR EVERY PRODUCT, 
EVERY MARKET, EVERY BUDGET . . . 



BIFF BAKER U.S.A. 
CITY DETECTIVE 
CURTAIN CALL 
FAMOUS PLAYHOUSE 
FOLLOW THAT MAN 
GUY LOMBARDO AND 
ROYAL CANADIANS 
HEART OF THE CITY 
HOLLYWOOD OFF-BEAT 
I'M THE LAW 
MAYOR OF THE TOWN 



PLAYHOUSE 15 
PRIDE OF THE FAMILY 
ROCKY JONES, SPACE RANGER 
ROYAL PLAYHOUSE 
AND COUNTERPOINT 
HIS SOLDIERS OF FORTUNE 
TELESPORTS DIGEST 
THE LONE WOLF 
TOUCHDOWN 
WHERE WERE YOU? 





THE MORAL OF HPL: INTEGRITY PAYS OFF IN BROADCASTING 



they are signed to a contract. Once in the 
organization, they're pretty certain of a 
profitable and long-term association. WCBS 
New York's Galen Drake, for example, was 
the first director hired when HPL began to 
expand. Today, he's director in the nation's 
number one market with more friends in 
the food business than you could crowd into 
a giant supermarket (although HPL sells 
such varied items as automobiles, books, 
furnaces and furniture, the majority of its 
accounts are foods and allied products sold 
in food stores). 

Still legendary in Southern California 
broadcasting circles are the almost identical 
voices and delivery styles of teacher Wiley 
and pupil Drake, who had been a Long 
Beach (Calif.) singer-announcer before join- 
ing the HPL organization on the West Coast 
in 1940. The story is told that, at times, Mr. 
Drake would walk into a studio while Mr. 
Wiley was on the air, and, on signal from 
Mr. Wiley, pick up the broadcast in mid- 
sentence and carry on without the audience 
realizing there had been a change in broad- 
casters. To a great extent, many of the HPL 
directors today are "interchangeable." 

In a listing of the HPL directors, you'll 
find a personality in every market who is 
well known as a local speaker and is no 
mean shakes when it comes to the economics 
of selling and merchandising, too. They 
are: Morgan Baker (WEEI), Lewis Martin 
(WBT), Paul Gibson (WBBM), James 
Taylor (WGAR) , Phil Norman (KNX), 
Allen Gray (WCCO), Galen Drake 
(WCBS), John Trent (WCAU), Mark 
Evans (WTOP and WRVA), Philip Stevens 
(KMOX), Grant Williams (KSL and 
KIRO) and Lee Adams (KCBS). 

Biography 

A short biography of an HPL director 
might serve to point up the kind of back- 
grounds from which they come. Take Phil 
Doelker, bora in Columbus, Ohio. He was 
the son of a slaughter-house and grocery 
chain owner and at age nine learned to 
butcher and dress meat. Later, full of teen- 
age enthusiasm, he operated a mail order 
retail business — in antiques. He graduated 
from Ohio State U. with a degree in chem- 
istry and genetics in 1934. 

Two years in Western Reserve U. helped 
him to decide that he didn't want to be the 
surgeon he had once dreamed of being. He 
left medical school and entered radio as 
Phil Staley in 1937. His jobs were acting, 
announcing, producing and programming 
for a number of Ohio stations. He joined 
CBS in 1944 as co-producer of the New 
York Philharmonic Orchestra programs. A 
year later he joined McCann-Erickson Inc. 
in New York, where he stayed on as a 
musical director and staff producer until 
1950. Then he became a production direc- 
tor for Radio Free Europe. This varied 
background in many phases of broadcast 
production and supervision proved to be just 
right for the kind of man who fits an 
HPL director's boots. He made application 

Page 42 • April 4, 1955 



for an opening, underwent the normal 
course of indoctrination, rigid by any stand- 
ards, became familiar with both the market 
and the HPL style of presentation and went 
to work as Philip Norman on KNX Radio. 
Today he's an established personality in Los 
Angeles and all of Southern California. 

Naturally, with emphasis on obtaining 
such talent, HPL has enlarged its program- 
ming for greater exposure of its directors. 
Also under the HPL structure in some 
markets are Sunrise Salute and Starlite Salute 
broadcasts. The format of these programs 
has been enlarged somewhat to include a 
variety theme for early morning and late 
evening broadcast. With variations from 
market to market, a combination House- 
wives' Protective League-Sunrise (or Star- 
lite) Salute package is offered to advertisers. 
All but two (WRVA and KSL) of the HPL 
stations have either one or the other of these 
programs and one station (WCAU) has 
both. 

Of the other HPL stations, WEEI, 
WBBM, KMOX, KIRO, and WTOP carry 




HPL's ED WOOD 

He runs a $3 million show. 



Sunrise Salute, and WBT, KNX, WCCO, 
WCBS, KCBS and WGAR carry Starlite 
Salute. 

Despite the fact that many of its accounts 
are national, each HPL operation is essen- 
tially a local one. While an advertiser may 
buy all or a combination of HPLs, he re- 
ceives no discounts for participation in more 
than one market. 

What does this cost the advertiser? Rate 
structures vary from market to market. 
KNX-i/PL charges $360 weekly for a firm 
13 -week, six-participations-weekly schedule 
on the HPL-Starlite Salute combination; for 
a three-participations-weekly schedule, also 
on firm 13-week contract, $234 weekly. For 
Starlite Salute alone, the charge is $320 a 
week for a firm 13 -week, six-participations- 
a-week schedule; for three participations a 
week, $180. 

Merchandising plays an important part 



in the function of Housewives' Protective 
League. In most markets complete mer- 
chandising facilities are available to HPL 
advertisers with in-store appearances by 
HPL directors. Often, the demand for a 
product through HPL advertising has led to 
new distribution in an area. In this light, 
Mr. Wood has established a close working 
relationship with food brokers through- 
out the country and their association, the 
National Food Brokers Assn. This relation- 
ship has become so close that twice the 
NFBA has come to Mr. Wood and asked 
HPL to produce films showing the operation 1 
of NFBA and the status of the food broker 
in the nation's sales economy. HPL direc- 
tors themselves invariably work closely in 
their markets with leading food brokers. 

One of HPL's strongest selling points is a 
file of its success stories. They range from 
small accounts just starting out to major 
top-budgeted national advertisers. One from 
the general manager of Rootes Motors Inc. 
(Hillman-Minx cars), reads, "I cannot help 
but recall times when our vehicles were 
completely unknown, especially in the west- 
ern states. 

"I can only say thank you for the great 
assistance you gave me to market an un- i 
familiar car in these United States. More | 
than once I have heard from our dealer 
organization that cars have been sold to the i 
public solely on the confidence that the ) 
public had in you. You have helped me to 
develop the state of California to such an || 
extent that it is today the leading state in ' 
the Union for our vehicles." 

An Award Winner 

The results HPL achieved for B&M Oven 
Baked Beans over WCAU won an award b 
from Broadcast Advertising Bureau (now 
Radio Advertising Bureau) in its "Radio i 
Gets Results" contest. B&M Baked Beans ;' 
had been distributed in Philadelphia for sev- 
era! years; then sales began to fall off. So ) 
the firm bought six participations a week on 
the HPL John Trent show — and sales in- j 
creased 47% during the first 26 weeks. The 
company, in a letter to WCAU, called the 
gains "phenomenal." It was a valid test ) 
for radio, too, since WCAV-HPL was the 
only advertising used in the area. 

When Kiplinger's Changing Times maga- 
zine used six HPL announcements in one 
market, over 5,600 copy requests were 
received, at a cost per-inquiry of 11 cents. | 

The success of HPL demonstrates that I 
radio can be as potent a selling force as 
ever when it's done with objective thinking 
and a clear eye on the consumer. HPL au- 
diences remain almost fanatically loyal to 
the programs and the simplest explanation [ 
is that its high standards and proven honesty 
are the forces that woo its listeners. Above 
all, HPL has proved that absolute integrity 
can pay off, and pay off well, in the broad- 
casting industry. 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



of the radio families in Metropolitan Los Angeles listen to 
KNX each week! 45% listen in a single day! 

For the first time, the leading stations in Los Angeles have 
an accurate measure of the number of different families 
listening during a day. . . during a week. • The new CPA 
(Cumulative Pulse Audience) report for Los Angeles and 
Orange Counties shows KNX reaches the greatest 
number of different families morning, afternoon and night, 
total day and total week! 

people than any other station! 
people than any newspaper! 
people than any magazine! 

First in the West's First Market .... KNX RADIO 

LOS ANGELES • 50,000 WATTS • COLUMBIA OWNED 
Broadcasting • Telecasting April 4, 1955 • Page 43 




HOW ONE TELEVISION STATION DOES IT — FROM ITS OWN FARM 



A COUPLE of weeks ago, NBC-TV's Home 
program celebrated the opening of spring 
by taking its viewers for a short visit to a 
350-acre Kentucky farm and a brief glimpse 
of cows and pigs and lambs and chickens, 
not to mention the succulent smoked ham 
cooking in the farmhouse kitchen. 

For many members of Home's audience 
the March 21 Kentucky farm sequence was 
a refreshing novelty, something new and 
different from their normal viewing fare. 
Not so, however, for those who were watch- 
ing the Home telecast through the facilities 
of NBC-TV affiliate WAVE-TV Louisville. 
To them this particular farm was a familiar 
spot, one which they had visited each Sat- 
urday noon since mid-January, taken there 
by the cameras of WAVE-TV. 

On these Saturday noon-to-1 p.m. tele- 
casts, titled simply Farm, WAVE-TV view- 
ers have watched the testing of the soil, the 
early plowing, the preparation of tobacco 
beds, the sowing of grass and clover, the 
starting of a vegetable garden. They have 
seen the farmers start baby chicks, baby pigs, 
baby lambs and baby calves on their way 
to becoming big, healthy, profitably market- 
able animals. They have viewed the other 
farm activities that follow in regular pro- 
gression during the late winter and early 
spring weeks as the farmer prepares for the 
summer season of growth for the fall har- 
vest. And many of them have profited by 
what they have seen, for they, too, are farm- 
ers and on their Kentucky and southern 
Indiana farms they work with much the 

Page 44 • April 4, 1955 



same soil and weather conditions, grow 
much the same crops, raise much the same 
livestock, operate much the same sort of 
establishments as the one they see on 
WAVE-TV. 

It was to serve the more than 630,000 
residents of the more than 150,000 farms 
in its coverage area (about 84,000 with tv 
sets as of the first of the year) that WAVE- 
TV last summer decided to undertake a 
regularly scheduled series of live tv pro- 
grams direct from a farm. That decision 
posed two immediate problems to the sta- 
tion's management. 

Just 13 Miles Away 

First, they needed a place to originate 
these programs, a working farm typical of 
the region, large enough to carry on a wide 
variety of farm activities and so located as 
to permit relaying a consistently good signal 
back to the station. This was solved by the 
acquisition of a 350-acre farm on gently 
rolling ground at a slightly higher altitude 
than the WAVE-TV studios and just 13 air 
miles away. 

The farm is no show place, the station 
management stresses, but an efficient, prac- 
tical working farm — a farmer's farm. For 
many years it has produced sheep, beef and 
dairy cattle, hogs, poultry, alfalfa, corn, 
wheat, barley, oats, bluegrass, orchard grass 
and fescue. For the Farm telecasts, the 
important crop of tobacco has been added. 

Station spokesmen declined to state what 
was paid for the property, pointing out that 



its subdivision area location would place 
the dollar value out of line with average 
farm acreage prices in the general farm 
area. A reasonable estimate, B»T was told, 
would be something in excess of $100,000. 
Approximately $50,000 more will be invest- 
ed in new agricultural equipment, both per- 
manent and mobile, during the 1955 pro- 
gram schedule, the station said. 

Next, WAVE-TV needed the services of 
men capable of conducting the program 
and operating the farm and doing both well. 
After an exhaustive survey of top agricul- 
tural experts throughout the land, WAVE- 
TV selected Shirley Anderson as station 
farm director and put him in charge of the 
Farm programs. Louisville county agent 
since 1927, Mr. Anderson last May received 
a distinguished service award from the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture — an award given 
to only eight other county agents chosen 
from well over 3,000 throughout the nation. 

Assisting Mr. Anderson on the programs 
is Paxton Marshall, who since 1948 has 
managed the same farm now operated by 
WAVE-TV and point of origin of the Farm 
program series. His wife, Shirley Marshall, 
has for some years conducted one of WAVE- 
TV's most popular cooking and home eco- 
nomics programs. 

To telecast a normal Farm program, 
WAVE-TV uses two cameras. One is trans- 
ported to the barns in the farmyard center 
by means of a specially constructed sled, 
hauled by a tractor. The second camera, 
equipped with a Zoomar lens, is moved 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



WILS DOMINATES 
LANSING RADIO 

ACCORDING TO THE LATEST SURVEY (FEB. '55) 
(HOOPER— FEB. 1955) 

SHARE OF RADIO AUDIENCE 



MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 
7:00 A.M.-12:00 NOON 


WILS 


NETWORK 

STATION B 


NETWORK 

STATION C 


38.3 


31.8 


20.3 


MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 
12:00 NOON-6:00 P.M. 


WILS 


NETWORK 

STATION B 


NETWORK 

STATION C 


48.9 


18.4 


23.9 


MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 
6:00 P.M.-10:00 P.M. 


WILS 


NETWORK 

STATION B 


NETWORK 

STATION C 


38.1 


28.8 


25.9 



WILS— 5000 WATTS DAY— 1000 WATTS NIGHT— 1320 KC 



allan5ina d Wod 



ion 




Represented Nationally 
By Venard-Rintoul-McConnell, Inc. 



407 N. WASHINGTON AVE. 
LANSING 30, MICHIGAN 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4. 1955 • Page 45 




vow 




fa 




'com 




OUR SINCERE THANKS to the studio production staff of 
"STORIES OF THE CENTURY" and to those stations and sponsors 
whose great confidence and all-out support made this award possible. 

MORTON W. SCOTT, President 
studio city tv productions. inc. 
(division of republic pictures') 






c 



( A .DIVISION OF REPUBLIC PICTURES) 



44 



The Academy of Television Arts and Sciences 
BEST WESTERN OR ADVENTURE SERIES OF 1954 

STORIES OF THE CENTURY 



A STUDIO CITY TV PRODUCTIONS, INC. PRODUCTION (DIVISION OF REPUBLIC PICTURES) 




The ACME of suspense, intrigue 
and mystery ! 



FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT HOLLYWOOD TELEVISION SERVICE, INC. 

4020 Carpenter Avenue, North Hollywood, California ... or any of the following distributors 



ALBANY 4, N. Y. 


DALLAS 1, TEXAS 


MILWAUKEE 3, WISCONSIN 


PITTSBURGH 19, PA. 


1046 Broodwoy 


4 1 2 S. Mar wood Street 


1 131 N. Eighth Street 


1709 Blvd. of the Allies 


Albany 5-2291 


Rondolph 4127 


Marquette 8-1876 


Atlantic 4858 


ATLANTA 1. GEORGIA 


DENVER 2, COLORADO 


MINNEAPOLIS 3, MINN. 


PORTLAND 9, OREGON 


162 Walton Street 


2145 Broadway 


1 104-06 Currio Avenuo 


1816 N. W. Kearney St. 


lOfflOl 66 1 1 


Tabor 2263 


Main 8071 


Atwaler 9405 


BOSTON 16, MASS. 


DES MOINES 9. IOWA 


NEW HAVEN 10, CONN. 


ST. IOUIS 3, MO. 


40 Piedmont Sir**! 


1 205 High Street 


132 Meadow Street 


3320 Olive Street 


Hancock 6 4288 


Dei Moinei 4-2239 


Locust 2-5163 


Jefferson 6548 


BUFFALO 2, N. Y. 


DETROIT 1, MICHIGAN 


NEW ORLEANS 12, LA. 


SAIT LAKE CITY, UTAH 


SOS Peorl Street 


221 1 Cast Avenuo 


1 50 S. liberty Street 


214 East First South St. 


Cleveland 24 21 


Woodward 1-6415 


Raymond 0765 


Sail lake 3-5709 


CHARLOTTE 1, N 


INDIANAPOLIS 4, INDIANA 


NEW YORK 19, N. Y. 


SEATTLE 1, WASHINGTON 


2 27 W*it 4th Street 


444 N. IllinoU Street 


630 Ninth Avenue 


2420 Second Avenue 


Edison 3 5138 


Melrose 5-4419 


Circle 6-0760 


Elliott 8678 


CHICAGO 5, ILLINOIS 


KANSAS CITY 8. MO. 


OKLAHOMA CITY 2, OKLA. 


SAN FRANCISCO 2, CALIF. 


)304 S. Wabaih Avenue 


215 West 18th Street 


718 West Grand Avenue 


221 Golden Gate Avenue 


Webiter 9 6090 


Grand 2390 


Regent 6-6651 


Market 1-6880 


CINCINNATI 14. OHIO 


LOS ANGELES 7, CALIF. 


OMAHA 9, NEBRASKA 


TAMPA 1, FLORIDA 


1632 Ctntrol Pork wo, 


1926 S. Vermont Avenue 


1514 Davenport Street 


115 S. Franklin Street 


Cherry 3021 


Republic 4-1131 


Atlantic 7474 


Tampa 2-3390 


CLEVELAND, OHIO 


MEMPHIS 2 TENN. 


PHILADELPHIA 7, PA. 


WASHINGTON 1 D. C. 


4S0 Film Building 


397 S. Second Street 


248 N. Clarion St, 


203 Eye Street, N. W. 


Protpecl 1 0034 


Memphii (-7318 


locust 7-471 W$y>; 


Republic 01 55 



about the farm in a small pick-up truck for 
covering the day's activities. Farm director, 
farm manager and the program's announcer 
travel by jeep from point to point. 

In the farmyard center, technicians have 
constructed a central tv studio, with control 
panels, heavy wire for the electric load, and 
floodlights as well as sky light for better 
lighting. This studio is 30 feet wide and 
45 feet long and has large sliding doors on 
both sides of the building, making it easy 
for animals and large equipment to enter 
and leave the studio. Hinged doors at either 
end of the building permit the maximum 
amount of natural light to enter. The studio 
floor is partly concrete and partly crushed 
rock, the concrete strip allowing the camera 
to move evenly. 

Personnel for the telecasts include the 
farm director, farm manager, program pro- 
ducer, director, two cameramen and the 
usual complement of audio, switching and 
supervisory engineers. In addition, there 
are two farm attendants whose primary re- 
sponsibility is to handle the various farm 
animals, controlling them and bringing them 
into proper camera range. These attendants 
also drive the tractor and other vehicles used 
for moving the cameras and men from one 
point to another. 

The station's mobile remote unit handles 
switching and camera control at the farm. 
One of the farm's silos is used as a micro- 
wave-relay tower to send the signal back to 
the WAVE-TV studios. 

The programming is scheduled so as to 
show each type of animal and crop at vari- 
ous stages of development. For instance the 
selection of varieties of hybrid seed corn 




THE PICTURE this camera picks up is 
beamed 13 miles to WAVE-TV's studios 
via the microwave disc atop the silo. 



and the preparation of the soil were shown 
last Saturday; the April 23rd telecast will 
demonstrate planting corn and fertilization. 
In June the program will show the planting 
of the late corn crop; in August, corn silage; 
in October, corn harvesting. 

In addition to providing the farmers with 
agricultural information such as recommend- 
ed, tested and practical farming procedures 
and methods, the station management be- 
lieves that an important benefit of Farm 
will be in acquainting city people and the 



great consuming public with the actual prob- 
lems of the food producer. "We hope city 
consumers will get an idea of how much 
work a farmer has to go through to produce 
a pound of wool or a quart of milk," one 
WAVE-TV executive said. 

Commercials for Federal Fertilizer (the 
only product advertised on Farm as yet) 
are integrated logically into the program. 
Pasture fertilizing is stressed in the telecasts 
from mid-February to mid-April. Fertiliza- 
tion of row crops, such as corn, tobacco and 
potatoes, will be highlighted during April 
and May. Through June the commercials 
will deal with fertilizing for the second cut- 
ting of alfalfa. July telecasts will emphasize 
fertilizing for seeding a new stand of alfalfa. 
Fertilizing for small grain seeding will be 
the sponsor's fall topic and in the final 
months of the year pasture fertilizing will 
again be stressed. 

Different mechanical methods of fertilizer 
application and distribution are shown and, 
later on, the results — for instance, a good 
stand of pasture — will also be shown, letting 
the viewers see for themselves the effects of 
following the recommended fertilizing pro- 
cedures. As other sponsors are added, the 
same integration of commercials will be fol- 
lowed, so far as is practicable. 

In pioneering this new field of farm tele- 
casting, WAVE-TV felt it would be render- 
ing a worthwhile public service to its com- 
munity. The comments it has received — 
from county agents and agricultural school 
officials as well as from farmers, yes, and 
some city folk, too — make the station believe 
it was on the right track when it started 
Farm on its weekly career. 



A RADIO MONEYMAKER BUCKS TV 



EVERY WEEK throughout the year, WPAT 
Paterson, N. J., a radio outlet which includes 
the metropolitan New York market in its 
coverage area, receives hundreds of un- 
solicited cards and letters which would 
suggest to the most ardent prophets of doom 
that nighttime radio can be a highly suc- 
cessful proposition. The source of this high 
degree of audience interest is a 7-11 p.m. 
broadcast entitled Gaslight Revue, a show 
which soft-pedals the spoken word and con- 
centrates on music. 

In the five years it has been on the air, 
Gaslight Revue has registered the largest 
audience gain of any time period in WPAT's 
18-hour broadcast day, and, in an area 
saturated with more than four million tele- 
vision receivers, it boasts an almost com- 
plete sell-out of commercial time seven 
nights weekly, as compared to a nearly non- 
existent commercial schedule in March 
1950. 

The WPAT answer to radio's role in 
nighttime broadcasting originated with its 
president and general manager, D. J. Wright, 
who with a group of associates bought the 
outlet in December 1954 from the North 
Jersey Broadcasting Co., a subsidiary of the 
Passaic Daily News. Mr. Wright, who joined 
WPAT as general manager in 1950, with 
more than 20 years of broadcasting experi- 
ence behind him, is a man who feels that 
an independent am station in a competitive 
market can both live with television as com- 



petition and skyrocket business volume at 
the same time. 

When WPAT was faced with the ques- 
tion of what to do to gain audience against 
a variety of radio programs on competing 
stations plus the gigantic threat of nighttime 
television, Mr. Wright decided to offer the 
simplest programming technique possible: 
"nothing more than beautiful, uninterrupted 
music," he told B»T. When Gaslight Revue 
went on the air, so intent was Mr. Wright 
on keeping the format simple and relaxing 
that "even the introductions of the musical 
selections were eliminated," he said. 

While the formula for the show is com- 
paratively simple, Mr. Wright pointed out 
that it requires careful guidance in the 
selection of music, which is supervised by 
David Gordon, one-time music librarian of 
WOR New York, now music director of 
WPAT. "And we are just as selective about 
our commercials as we are about program 
content," Mr. Wright said. 

Only two sponsors — Brogan- Cadillac 
Oldsmobile Co. and the Oldsmobile division 
of General Motors — started on the air with 
Gaslight Revue in March 1950. Currently 
17 local, regional and national advertisers 
have participating schedules on the pro- 
gram. Revenue on the series has increased 
1 16.7% since the show first went on the air. 
There are three advertising plans open to 
potential Gaslight Revue sponsors. A client 



may purchase a half-hour segment in strips 
of seven, or newscasts or one-minute spot 
announcements across the board. Within the 
framework of the half-hour strip, the spon- 
sor receives two one-minute spot announce- 
ments and one 20-second announcement at 
$100 per half-hour. Rate card prices on 
one-minute commercials and two-minute 
newscasts are $30 and $70, respectively. 
WPAT maintains a strict ruling on length 
of copy. Maximum number of words is 
150 for one-minute announcements and 50 
words in a 20-second spot. 

Judging from the mail pull of the show, 
listeners have taken a bright shine to the 
program. Early in 1953, Mr. Wright recalls, 
WPAT asked its audience a question four 
times each evening through one week. The 
query was "Do you like Gaslight Revue? If 
so, please write us." Nearly 10,000 letters 
of nodding approval were received at the 
station the following week. 

Again last year, the station asked its 
listeners for a period of a week if they 
would be interested in receiving a program 
guide listing titles of selections played on 
Gaslight Revue each evening. They were 
told that while plans for the program guide 
had not yet been formulated, WPAT was 
anxious to learn how many people would 
like to have such a booklet. At the end of 
the week, another 10,000 letters had poured 
into the station. 



Page 48 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



teis 




A B«T PICTURE STOF 




DAYTON STATIONS MOVE INTO 
$2 MILLION RADIO-TV CENTER 



NEW QUARTERS FOR WHIO 



WITH completion of its major improvement 
program, WHIO-AM-FM-TV Dayton, Ohio, 
now is operating in a plant that represents 
a $2 million investment since 1949. The 
original building at 1414 Wilmington Ave. 
included building, RCA equipment, tower, 
transmitter and mobile gear, involving a 
$600,000 investment. The 1954-55 program 
involves building an addition worth more 
than $500,000 plus $140,000 for new equip- 
ment and furniture. 

The new transmitter building and 1,104- 
ft. tower on Germantown St. were built at 
a cost of $641,000. Other expenditures 
brought the total to $2 million. 

All business and operating functions have 
been transferred to the enlarged studio and 
office building on the Wilmington Pike. 
Austin Co., which designed and built the 
original structure, worked out the trans- 
formation to a complete broadcasting center. 

Video control on a mezzanine permits use 
of common video control equipment and 
separates video control personnel from stu- 
dio routine. The control room includes 
console and film projection gear plus space 
for color units. Conduit runs are accessible 
and short. 





THE CONFERENCE ROOM provides ample and comfortable 
television set (which is not shown) for monitoring the station's 



seating facilities, plus a 
programs. 




THE MASTER control room is located next to the director's booth on the mezzanine. 
Both overlook the main television studio, which can be seen through the windows. 





RADIO CONTROL. All three radio studios 
are grouped around this control center. 



GENERAL MANAGER Robert H. Moody greets visitors in this walnut-paneled office 
which adjoins the conference room shown in top photo. 



Page 50 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



Let the figures 
tell the story! 




} Population — 3,607,600 
^ No. of Families -1,045,800 
} Retail Sales- $4, 127,897,000 
^ Drug Sales - $1 19,797,000 



tistct afeeaet mote... 
m t&e ceaten o£ 
tfo WNHC-TV 

on/tit Off c^Cumcef 

Food Sales - $1,146,520,000 
Conn. Fam. Income — $6,786 

(Per Family) 

Only VHF in Connecticut 
TV Families -934,448 



SOURCES: 1955 Sales Management Pre-Final Estimates; CBS— Nielson Survey Updated with RETMA Set Sales— January 1, 1955; Mail map (black dots) based on 
10,000 letter response, completed December 1954; Contour map accepted by FCC December 1954 



REPRESENTED BY KATZ 



316,' 




WATTS 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 51 



ADVERTISERS & AGENCIES 



(A&A continues from page 32) 
family group activity" producing the purchase; 
influence of various informational sources as 
influencing purchasing decisions, and the cul- 
mination of the purchasing decision into brand 
selection — "the most important of all decisions 
from the manufacturer and the agency's point 
of view." 

U. S. Steel, GE to Take Over 
CBS-TV Spot Dropped by Pabst 

U. S. STEEL Co. and General Electric Co., 
effective July 6, will alternate weekly drama 
sponsorship on Wednesday, 10-11 p.m. EST, 
on CBS-TV, the period vacated by Pabst Blue 
Ribbon Bouts which moves to ABC-TV. 

U. S. Steel shifts from its present period on 
ABC-TV, Tuesdays, 9:30-10:30 p.m. EST, 
which it has had since October 1953. Format 
of the show will remain the same and will con- 
tinue to be supervised by the Theatre Guild. 
BBDO, New York, is the agency. 

General Electric has bought 26 films from 
20th Century-Fox Film Corp., to be presented 
on the alternate weeks. Series has a dramatic 
format. Young & Rubicam, New York, is the 
agency for GE. 

The new hour-long series will be telecast on 
an all-live network of 115 CBS-TV stations. 

Kodak to Replace 'Norby' 

EASTMAN KODAK Co., through J. Walter 
Thompson Co., New York, has decided to 
abandon Norby (Wed., 7-7:30 p.m. EST, on 
NBC-TV), effective April 6, and has bought a 
film series from Screen Gems Inc., New York, 
which will be sponsored Wednesday 8-8:30 
p.m. on NBC-TV, starting April 13. 

The new program, Kodak Request Perform- 
ance will run a minimum of 21 weeks. It will 
include outstanding plays from the current 
Ford Theatre, produced by Screen Gems, and 
from Top Plays of 1955, distributed by Screen 
Gems. 

Kodak firm, which entered television for the 
first time last January with the all-color Norby 
series, is now formulating plans for a new 
major tv series to be presented on film next 
fall over the same 84 stations that will carry 
Kodak Request Performance. 

W-H, Lambert Merge 

MERGER of Warner-Hudnut Inc., cosmetic 
firm, and Lambert Co., drug company, was ap- 
proved at a special stockholders meeting last 
week. The merger, effective last Wednesday, in- 
volved the exchange of one share of Warner- 
Hudnut common stock for each share of Lam- 
bert common. 

The firm's new corporate name is Warner- 
Lambert Pharmaceutical Co. Combined sales 
of both companies reportedly will exceed $100 
million annually. 

Pontiac to Switch to Drama 

PONTIAC, sponsors of the Red Buttons Show 
on NBC-TV, Fridays, 8-8:30 p.m., will drop 
the program and sponsor a dramatic series 
effective Sept. 6, Tuesdays, 9:30-10:30 p.m., 
alternating weekly with Armstrong Cork Co. 
Latter advertiser currently sponsors Circle The- 
atre, Tuesdays, 9:30-10 p.m. on NBC-TV but 
will expand the program to one hour starting 
in the fall. 

Pontiac is represented by MacManus, John 
& Adams, New York, and Armstrong's agency 
is BBDO, New York. 

The Friday night period, 8-8:30 p.m., has 
been offered to Chrysler Corp., but nothing defi- 
nite has been signed. 

Page 52 • 'April 4, 1955 



ME., TENN. ENACT 
BAIT-SWITCH LAWS 

MAINE and Tennessee are the second and 
third states, respectively, to enact legislation 
to curb bait and switch advertising, it was 
announced last week by the Assn. of Better 
Business Bureaus Inc., New York. The first 
state, Massachusetts, has had its anti-baiting law 
in effect since mid- 195 3. 

Maine's law became effective March 14 and 
Tennessee's March 22, it was reported. The 
two laws provide penalties up to $500 and ad- 
vertisers also may be enjoined from such adver- 
tising. Basic purpose of the laws is to curb 
those who advertise merchandise at very low 
prices with the intent not to sell the merchan- 
dise, but rather to switch the prospect to high 
price items. 

Six other states have similar bills pending. 
These include Rhode Island, New York, Penn- 
sylvania, Ohio, Kansas and California. Illinois 
is expected to introduce a bill in the near future, 
it was reported. The bills are based on a model 
law recommended by the Council of State Gov- 
ernments to state legislatures in its 1954 pack- 
age of suggested legislation. 

ABBB's Bait Advertising Committee has en- 
dorsed the model law as a way to curb adver- 
tising abuses, but "it also believes the simplest 
answer to the problem is for media to flatly 
reject such advertising which is a policy now 
being followed by most media in such cities as 
Omaha, St. Louis, Amarillo and Washington, 
D. C. The BBBs generally consider 'bait' the 
worst abuse in advertising today." 

Meanwhile, ABBB reported that Detroit's 
bait advertising law had "successfully passed 
its first test," citing that television repairman 
James Whitt was fined $100 on March 11 by 
Traffic Referee John G. Carney. It was alleged 
that Mr. Whitt, doing business as Do-All Tele- 
vision Service, advertised house calls at $1.50, 
but "padded this feature price by selling un- 
necessary tubes." 

Kudner Agency Consolidates 
Print, Radio-Tv Timebuying 

PRINT media and the radio-television time- 
buying departments of Kudner Agency, New 
York, are being consolidated under the general 
supervision of Hugh Johnson, director of media, 
effective this week, 
J. H. S. Ellis, presi- 
dent of the agency, 
announced last week. 

At the same time 
it was revealed that 
John P. Marsich be- 
comes assistant di- 
rector of media in 
charge of timebuy- 
ing, with John J. 
Murphy Jr., Mar- 
jorie C. Scanlan, and 
Ann Gardiner con- 
tinuing as timebuy- 
ers, and Frank M. 
Nolan becomes assistant director of media in 
charge of print buying. Anne Wade, assistant 
to Mr. Nolan, has been advanced to print 
media buyer. E. G. Weymouth continues as 
associate media director. 

Mr. Marsich has been with the agency since 
1949, first as assistant manager of the radio-tv 
department and later head timebuyer. 

Mr. Nolan started at Kudner in 1935. He 
has worked on all accounts in the agency. 




MR. MARSICH 



SPOT NEW BUSINESS 

Cinch Products Inc., L. A. (Cinch cake mixes), 
through Hixson & Jorgensen Inc., there, starts 
saturation tv-radio spot announcement cam- 
paign, with Mon.-Sat. schedule, utilizing in Cali- 
fornia over 3,900 spots on 21 radio stations and 
340 spots on two tv stations; and in Colorado, 
over 1,000 spots on five radio stations and 60 
spots on one tv station, for 13 weeks. Radio-tv 
spots created by Song Ads Co., Hollywood. 

Servisoft of California (soft water service), 
L. A., through William W. Harvey Co., there, 
starts cooperative radio spot announcements 
on undetermined number of western stations 
and five participations weekly on KRCA (TV) 
Hollywood Home, both effective today (Mon.). 

Simoniz Co. Ltd., Toronto, Ont. (floor polish), 
has started five times weekly announcement 
campaign on a large number of Canadian radio 
stations. Agency is Walsh Adv. Ltd., Toronto. 

Cudahy Packing Co., Toronto, Ont. (Old Dutch 
Cleanser), has started weekly half-hour panel 
program Hide and Seek on nine Canadian 
major market radio stations. Agency is J. J. 
Gibbons Ltd., Toronto. 

Yardley of Canada Ltd., Toronto, Ont. (cos- 
metics), has started test tv campaign on CFPL- 
TV London, with film spot announcements 
twice weekly for 12 weeks. Long range sales 
results will be tested on this campaign before 
other stations are used in Canada. Agency is 
McKim Adv. Ltd., Toronto. 

Arnesto Paint Co., N. Y., will use radio spots to 
open its 1955 campaign. Starting in April for 
10 weeks company will use spots in New York, 
New Jersey and New England areas. Agency 
is Philips Rohr & Co., N. Y. 

NETWORK NEW BUSINESS 

Steinberg's Ltd., Montreal (chain grocery), has 
started weekly half-hour French-language pro- 
gram 14 Rue de Galais on four French-language 
CBC-TV network stations for 52 weeks. Firm 
is also using an English-language film show on 
CBMT (TV) Montreal, and film spots on 
English-language Quebec provincial tv stations. 
Agency is Grant Adv. of Canada, Montreal. 

Seaboard Finance Co., L. A., has started three- 
weekly segments of Amos V Andy Music Hall 
(Mon.-Fri., 6:30-6:55 p.m., PST) on 15 Co- 
lumbia Pacific Radio Network stations for 13 
weeks. Frank Bull & Co., L. A., is agency. 

National Labor-Management Foundation {Part- 
ners magazine) to sponsor Fulton Lewis jr. on 
Mutual, Sundays, 9-9:15 p.m. EST, starting 
April 3. This extended Mr. Lewis' program 
to six-day-a-week basis. Program content to 
be directed toward articles in magazine. 

AGENCY APPOINTMENTS 

State Advertising Commission, Tallahassee, Fla., 
appoints Carey Assoc., Sarasota, to handle tv 
advertising for Florida during the coming busi- 
ness year. 

Clyde Beatty Circus appoints Mort Goodman 
Adv., L. A., to handle radio spot advertising; 
Hotel Riviera, Las Vegas, names Goodman to 
handle all advertising jointly with Harris & 
Whitebrook Adv., Miami Beach; United Cere- 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



. . . especially people like 
HERB SHELDON 



people 
make 




salesmen 



Wherever there's a TV set in the nation's 
No. 1 market, Herb finds a warm welcome 
waiting for him — just for being himself. That 
means being natural, neighborly and funny, 
as he entertains (and sells) the lady of the 
house, every weekday morning from 8:55 to 10. 
It's a program custom-made for housewives . . . 
including a special cooking feature by 
Josephine McCarthy. And homemakers clearly 
find Herb captivating, because they keep busy 
buying the products he demonstrates 
and recommends. 

His clients keep busy, too, writing nice 
letters like this: 

"/ cannot tell you how pleased we are ivith 
the selling job that you have been doing jor 
Whirlpool. The impact of your 'low pressure 
selling is one reason why Whirlpool is 
number one in the number one market." 

David Oreck, V. P. in Charge of Sales, • 
Bruno— New York, Inc. 




Broadcasting • Telecasting 



When you're considering media to help 
you sell the New York market, remember 
this oldest of advertising truths: People 
Make The Best Salesmen ! And WRCA-TV 
has some of the warmest, most persuasive 
people in television. Like Jinx Falkenburg, 
Norman Brokenshire, Ken Banghart, 
Gene Rayburn . . . and like Herb Sheldon. 

WRCA-TV. 4 



//* New York, sell 
more on 4 

Represented by NBC SPOf SALES , 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • DETROIT . CLEVELAND 
WASHINGTON • SAN' FRANCISCO; •"tOS ANGELES 
CfijfVR'LOTTE* •rATLAN.TJQ .-RAH' LAS* 
*Bomor Lowrance Associates ' "j !c- i 

April 4, 1955 



. : j; 

Page II 



ADVERTISERS & AGENCIES 



bral Palsy appoints Goodman to handle na- 
tional and regional tv and radio promotion. 

Fradelis Frozen Food Corp., L. A. (frozen 
"heat and serve" dinners), appoints Mogge- 
Privett Inc., that city. Local tv will be used 
with similar campaigns being readied for other 
markets. 

Lee Pharmacal Co., Beverly Hills, appoints 
J. P. Shelley & Assoc. Inc., L. A., to handle 
advertising for its new, unnamed pharmaceu- 
tical product. 

Monarch Finer Foods Division, Consolidated 
Grocers Corp. (western division), L. A., names 
Stromberger, LaVene, McKenzie, same city. 

Lee Ltd., Beverly Hills (Dri-Mist deodorant), 
names Erwin, Wasey & Co., L. A. 

Parsons Ammonia Co., N. Y., appoints Kiese- 
wetter, Baker, Hagedorn & Smith, N. Y., to 
handle its advertising, effective April 1. Radio 
spots will continue to be used and television 
will be tested. 

Magnetic Recorder & Reproducer Corp., Phila., 
appoints Benham Adv., same city. 

Miami High Life, distributor of Miller High 
Life beer, names Charles Anthony Gross Adv., 
Miami. 

Frigimeats Inc., Chicago (frozen meats), ap- 
points Schwimmer & Scott Inc., that city. 

Elgin National Watch Co. (Ordnance Div.) ap- 
points Waldie & Briggs Inc., Chicago, to handle 
advertising for electronic products under new 
expanded program. Agency has handled Abra- 
sives Div. account of same company since 1949. 

Zotox Pharmacal Co., Stamford, Conn., names 
Erwin, Wasey of Canada Ltd., Toronto, for 
Canada. 

AGENCY SHORTS 

Young & Rubicam, N. Y., has been incorpo- 
rated in Germany and has completed working 
agreement there with associate agency, Heu- 
mann Werbegesellschaft, Frankfort. Kenneth 
Hartshorn, London office, is in charge of Ger- 
man organization. 

Harold Dreyfus, vice president, Noel, Lent & 
Assoc., L. A., forms own agency, The Dreyfus 
Co., with offices at 833 N. Kings Rd. Tele- 
phone is Webster 1-1831. Initial accounts are 
International Pacific Recording Corp., Tastee 
Products of California, Tippa Products Corp. 
(imported German Tippa typewriters) and Vi- 
Cly Industries (paints). 

Fred Gardner Co., N. Y., has moved to larger 
offices at 50 E. 42d St.; telephone: Murray 
Hill 7-4784. 

Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles, N. Y., 

moves to larger offices, occupying three floors, 
at 477 Madison Ave. 

Sackel Co., 8 Newbury St., Boston, has been 
opened to handle trade and consumer advertis- 
ing, merchandising and publicity, with Sol 
Sackel as president and Ralph Schiff, general 
manager. 

A&A PEOPLE 

Arthur W. Lutz, former board chairman, Smart 
& Final Iris Co., Los Angeles wholesale grocery 
concern, to board of directors and executive 
committee, Consolidated Foods Corp., Chicago. 

Harold R. Fagerson, vice president in charge 
of sales, Borden's Chicago Milk Div., named 
sales director, Chicago-Central District. 




A SERIES of "refresher" luncheons was 
held in Chicago recently for agency and 
advertising people by Free & Peters Inc., 
radio-tv station representative, in connec- 
tion with the Kansas City market, where 
F&P represents KMBC-TV. Participating 
in a luncheon March 22 were (I to r): Wil- 
liam Tynan, tv sales manager, Free & 
Peters, Chicago; William Stanton, account 
executive, Campbell-Mithun Inc., and 
George Morgan, advertising manager, 
The Wander Co. (Ovaltine). 



L. J. (Larry) Hubbard elected vice president, 
Doherty, Clifford, Steers & Shenfield, N. Y. 
Mr. Hubbard joined the firm in 1953 as di- 
rector of research. 

John F. MacKay, creative director and head of 
creative plans board, Anderson & Cairns, N. Y., 
elected vice president. 

John F. W. McClure, assistant account group 
supervisor, National Biscuit Co. account, Mc- 
Cann-Erickson, N. Y., appointed vice president. 

Walter Mead and Marjorie Greenbaum, copy 
supervisors, Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, N. Y., 
named vice presidents. 

John T. Morris, director of marketing, F.&M. 
Schaefer Brewing Co., elected vice president. 
Also elevated to vice presidents were Bruce 
W. Hackstaff, director of plant and production, 
and Eugene J. O'Connor, general manager of 
Schaefer's Albany plant. 

Norman R. Anderson, account executive, John 
W. Shaw Adv. Inc., Chicago, elected vice presi- 
dent. 

C. G. Coburn, formerly senior public relations 
account supervisor, J. Walter Thompson, N. Y., 
named director of public relations, Pan-Amer- 
ican Coffee Bureau. 

Richard J. Pearson, advertising and sales pro- 
motion manager, Bireley's Div., General Foods, 
to Erwin, Wasey & Co., Los Angeles, as senior 
account executive. 

Samuel S. Moody Jr., formerly with McCann- 
Erickson, N. Y., to Robert W. Orr & Assoc., 
N. Y., as merchandising director. Estelle Men- 
delsohn, formerly with Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample, N. Y., to copy staff, same agency. 

S. J. Niefeld, in charge of special research proj- 
ects, Henri, Hurst & McDonald Inc., Chicago, 
appointed research director. 

Maurice Umans promoted to creative director, 
Paris & Peart, N. Y. Robert Shiels, formerly 
with William Esty, named Paris & Peart copy 
chief. Bee Hargrove, formerly with Young & 
Rubicam, and Adele Thomas, formerly with 
Kenyon & Eckhardt, join as associate copy 
chiefs. Michael Matera, formerly with Hanly 



Hicks Montgomery, Bob Reed, formerly with 
Fletcher D. Richards, and Don Torrone, for- 
merly with J. Walter Thompson, appointed 
associate art directors. 

H 

Robert Kroll, formerly with BBDO, to War* 
wick & Legler, N. Y., as tv copy supervisor. 

Vivian McMurtrey Case, copy chief, Rhoades 
& Davis, L. A., and previously head of own 
Portland agency, to West-Marquis Inc., L. A., 
as copy chief. 

John Fish returns to Walter McCreery Inc., 
Beverly Hills, as art director. He succeeds 
James Buckmeyer, now associated with Clark 
Ross Adv. Agency, St. Louis. 

Jim Neiswander, formerly with WTVI (TV) 
Belleville, 111. (St. Louis), to Olian Adv. 
Agency, St. Louis, as account executive. 

Mai Thompson, production supervisor, Trans- 
film Inc., N. Y., to BBDO same city, as tv 
producer. 

Edward Watson, formerly of CHAT Medicine 
Hat, Alta., to assistant radio-tv director, E. W. 
Reynolds Adv. Ltd., Toronto. 

Donald W. Brown, formerly continuity director, 
KVTV (TV) Sioux City, Iowa, and KSOO 
Sioux Falls, S. D., to Allen & Reynolds, Omaha, 
Neb., as copywriter. 

Beth Norman, former freelance radio-tv pro- 
ducer, San Francisco area, to Richard N. Melt- 
zer Adv. Inc., L. A., as copywriter. 

James O'Neil Jr., Continental Baking Co., N. Y., 
to Ted Bates & Co., same city, as account 
assistant. 

Tom Quigley, commercial manager, CFCF 
Montreal, to MacLaren Adv. Ltd., Toronto. 

Al Weinthal, promotion manager, CFCF Mon- 
treal, to radio-tv department, Harold F. Stan- 
field Ltd., Montreal advertising agency. 

Robert Hunter Higgons, formerly account ex- 
ecutive, Hicks & Greist, N. Y., named to simi- 
lar position, Biow-Beirn-Toigo Inc., same city. 

Ben Morris, promotion specialist, Lever Bros., 
N. Y., to marketing and sales development div., 
Grey Adv., same city. 

George W. Morris, Erwin, Wasey & Co., N. Y., ] 
to BBDO, same city. 

Jack Cummings, BBDO, N. Y., to media dept., 
Biow-Beirn-Toigo, same city. 

Dan Regan, press dept., NBC New York, to 
publicity staff, Calkins & Holden, same city. 

C. Stuart Mitchell, account executive, Compton 
Adv., N. Y., father of boy, C. Stuart III. 

Alex Victor, account executive, Western Adv. 
Agency, father of boy, Barry, March 11. 

Edward Rizzo, tv copy supervisor, Compton i 
Adv., N. Y., and Robert Van Buren, artist, 
same agency, fathers of boys, March 20. 

Paul Wickman, vice president for radio-tv, 
Western Adv. Agency Inc., L. A., resigns to 
become director of development, National So- 
ciety for Crippled Children and Adults, Chi- 
cago. 

Robert M. Watson, newly-elected vice president, 
Ruthrauff & Ryan, N. Y., will be guest speaker 
April 21 at Inside Advertising Banquet of L 
Assn. of Advertising Men & Women, Hotel 
Biltmore, N. Y. 



Page 54 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 





The Flags Flew 



This is Harry Martin, tv host with the 
most. He plows a full schedule of farm 
programs on Channel 6 in Indianapolis. 
His Market Reports, sponsored by Ralston 
Purina at noon daily, has the rapt attention 
of the agricultural set hereabouts (here- 
abouts includes 90,000 farm families in 
our coverage area). 

A few weeks ago Purina offered, via 
Harry's show, a hundred mail box flags to 
the first hundred viewers whose letters or 
post cards had the earliest postmarks. 

The single announcement brought 2,606 
requests. The winners were all postmarked 
within two hours of the announcement. 
Martin's pulling power prompted Purina 
to discontinue the offer, which had been 
set for successive repeats. 



WFBM-AM & TV 

INDIANAPOLIS 

National Reps: The Katz Agency 

Affiliated with WEOA, Evansville; 
WFDF, Flint; WOOD AM & TV, Grand Rapids 



Harry Martin was born on a farm which 
was bought from the government by one 
of his ancestors in 1826, ten years after 
Indiana became a state. It would take a 
Wabash Indian to claim earlier roots in 
Indiana. Pioneering's in his blood — 
Harry began the first regular farm tv pro- 
gram in Indiana, did the first live studio 
demonstration commercials (both for 
WFBM-TV) and keeps in touch with the 
soil via his suburban acres where he raises 
rutabagas and Indiana limestone. 

Like all WFBM. personalities, he also 
raises results, for sponsors. 



ng • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 55 



WYLIE OUTLINES 'FILM UNIVERSITY' 



Author and 'Omnibus' story 
editor reveals adult education 
idea under consideration by 
DuMont and Columbia U. 
whereby college credits might 
be earned by viewers. Sta- 
tions would be permitted to 
sell adjacent time spots to 
sponsors of programs. 

A WEDDING of university-level institutions 
and tv film to spawn adult education on a 
mass basis via commercial stations is being 
proposed. As of last week, however, the merger 
had not occurred. 

Prime mover of a "film university" is Max 
Wylie, author of Clear Channels and currently 
story editor of the Omnibus project of the Ford 
Foundation's Tv-Radio Workshop. Mr. Wylie, 
in an address before the National Television 
Film Council Thursday, reported on what he 
said were negotiations between DuMont and 
Columbia U.'s school of general studies. In 
sight, he indicated, was the use of DuMont's 
newly-developed combined live-film camera 
("electronicam"). 

Mr. Wylie said educational institutions could 
program lecture courses toward degree credit 
on quality film for showing on commercial sta- 
tions which would be permitted to sell adja- 
cencies to sponsors. He likened the service to a 
film library. Viewers who wished to "take ex- 
aminations toward degree credit would pay en- 
rollment fees. 

Questioned on Mr. Wylie's assertions, both 
Columbia U. and DuMont spokesmen said they 
were premature. A meeting of Ted Bergmann, 
managing director of the DuMont Television 
Network; Dean Louis Hacker, Columbia U. 
school of general studies; Leon Levine, of 
Columbia's radio-tv department, and Mr. Wylie, 
had been held, they admitted, but no commit- 
ments were made. 

It also was understood that DuMont con- 
siders this possible use of its live-film camera 
as only minor when compared to the more 
extensive plans it is about to take out of wraps. 
The latter have been hinted to extend from 
possibilities of "film library service" to film 



distribution via the network and to "servicing" 
of film companies. 

Actually, the DuMont-Columbia talk, in- 
spired and brought about by Mr. Wylie, ex- 
plored the possibility of programming courses, 
probably on a live basis, on DuMont's owned 
and operated WABD (TV) New York. When 
mention was made of possible repeats — live or 
on film — for evening hours within a 48-hour 
period, Mr. Bergmann reportedly brought up 
the new DuMont-developed camera. 

Columbia U. spokesmen point out that the 
school now has no plans for so extending its 
accredited adult extension courses, but should 
it wish to "experiment" it would be necessary 
first to obtain university council approval and 
then to find a way to defray production costs. 
There was an allusion to the possibility of a 
grant for this purpose. 

It also was reported that the Columbia- 
DuMont talk was in terms of programming at 
the end of this or at the beginning of next year. 

Pickford Files New Suit 
Against Goldwyn for $50 # 000 

ADDITIONAL suit for $50,000 has been filed 
by Mary Pickford against Samuel Goldwyn 
in the hassle over Goldwyn Studios. A new 
complaint, filed March 25 in Long Beach 
Superior Court, charges that in 1949 the court 
ordered the producer to remove everything 
from the property that belonged to him, in- 
dividually, and to Goldwyn Productions Inc. 
She charges that, when he failed to do this 
within the allotted 30 days, the personal prop- 
erty, including sets, props and supplies, fell 
under her ownership. Damages are asked for 
Goldwyn's continued use of these assets without 
accounting to her. 

Later last week Miss Pickford was denied 
an accounting of the rentals, which she had 
charged Mr. Goldwyn has failed to make to 
her since 1949. Superior Judge Paul Nourse 
ruled that the former actress had not been 
ousted from the studio by Mr. Goldwyn, as 
she alleged [B«T, March 28], and was therefore 
not entitled to an accounting. 

Miss Pickford's new suit will be heard after 
the producer's $503,535 suit against her for a 
share of studio operation and maintenance has 
been settled. 




A "MAYOR" helped a governor celebrate 
his birthday recently while visiting Spring- 
field, III. The occasion was actor Thomas 
Mitchell's visit to promote his Mayor of 
the Town on WICS (TV) there. L to r: 
Thomas Staley, president of Staley Milling 
Co., Kansas City, which sponsors the film 
on WICS; Mr. Mitchell, and Gov. William 
Stratton. Mr. Mitchell, who also met with 
Staley dealers, was accompanied on the 
visit by Jack Dow, account executive, 
Bozell & Jacobs; Robert Riley, MCA-TV, 
and E. B. Corley, Staley div. sales mgr. 



'Fairbanks' Sales Drive Starts 

SALES drive for Douglas Fairbanks Presents, 
tv series available for first run in over 250 
markets, will get underway today (Monday), 
George T. Shupert, president of ABC Film 
Syndication Inc., announced last week. The 
78 half-hour episodes in the series were pro- 
duced by Mr. Fairbanks for the Liebmann 
Breweries for telecast in approximately 12 
markets where its Rheingold beer is sold. The 
dramas star Mr. Fairbanks in one out of every 
four episodes. 

Merchandising material for the series includes 
a shopping guide which gives advertisers an 
opportunity to promote products in conjunction 
with the show. With the addition of the series, 
ABC Film Syndication now has five properties 
in syndication. The others are: Racket Squad; 
The Playhouse; Kieran's Kaleidoscope, and 
Passport to Danger. 



FILM SALES 

Standard Television, Beverly Hills, according 
to President Bob Berger, has closed deals for 
its 19-feature film package with the following 
stations: KGNC-TV Amarillo, KFJZ-TV Ft. 
Worth, WGBI-TV Scranton, WSPD-TV Toledo, 
WEWS (TV) Cleveland, WOW-TV Omaha, 
KMBC-TV Kansas City and XETV (TV) 
Tijuana. 

Reid H. Ray Film Industries Inc., St. Paul, an- 
nounces Walt's Workshop, filmed "how-to-do- 
it" series, has now been placed in its 34th 
market with sale to KGNC-TV Amarillo, Tex., 
for 52 weeks. Order was placed through Rosen- 
wald-Krupp & Assoc. 

FILM DISTRIBUTION 

Sterling Television Co., N. Y., announced last 
week it has acquired tv distribution rights to 
all filmed properties of the TeeVee Co., Beverly 
Hills. Sterling is preparing promotion kits for 
its new programming. Properties of TeeVee 
include Tales of Tomorrow, This Is Charles 
Laughton, Invitation Playhouse, Little Theatre, 
Camera's Eye and Gigi and Jock. 



FILM PRODUCTION 

Reah Productions has begun production on 
/ Spy, new Guild Films Co. tv series, at Par- 
sonnet Studios, Astoria, L. I., N. Y., under 
Guild Films supervision. The series, starring 
Raymond Massey, will cover 26 episodes trac- 
ing the adventures of famous spies and how 
they changed the course of history. 

Charles Michelson Inc., N. Y., has completed 
26 half-hour programs of The New Adventures 
of Michael Shayne, featuring Jeff Chandler and 
based on character created by Brett Halliday, 
and will place show on syndication market 
April 1. 

FILM PEOPLE 

Edward L. Koenig, Jr., formerly vice president, 
Vitapix Corp., named assistant to Hal Roach, 
Jr., as coordinator for national and syndication 
sales, Hal Roach Enterprises, Culver City, 
Calif. 

Robert Bernstein, formerly with the publicity 
dept., DuMont Television Network, to public 
relations staff, Guild Films Co., N. Y., re- 
porting to Lou Shainmark, vice president. 



Robert G. Reagan, public information office, 
U. S. Army, Fort Ord, Calif., to MCA-TV 
Ltd., film syndication div., as publicity manager 
for western div., with headquarters in Beverly 
Hills, Calif. 

Judith Anderson, stage and motion picture star, 
signed last week with B-F Production Co., 
N. Y., for new one-woman tv dramatic series 
based on Bible. Mark Van Doren, poet, novel- 
ist and critic, will edit scripts. Settings for 
series will be supervised by Donal Oenslager. 
scenic designer. Music will be composed and 
conducted by Jerome Moross. 

Peter Harhay, formerly wtih Texas Industrial 
Film Co., named film director, John Norman 
Productions, Houston, Tex. 

Joe Hoffman, contract writer, Universal-Inter- 
national, and David Stephenson, assistant pro- 
ducer, ABC-TV Cavalcade of America, to 
Screen Gems Inc., Hollywood, as producers on 
NBC-TV Ford Theatre and upcoming Celebrity 
Theatre, respectively. Tony Leader signed by 
SG to direct 20 more half-hour films for the 
firm. 



Page 56 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 




TELEQUIPMENT NEWS 

Published by the General Electric Company, Electronics Park, Syracuse, N. Y. 



WSJS CONVERTS TO COLOR-ALL G-E EQUIPPED 

Station Leadership Advanced By Ease and Low Cost 
of Converting G-E Studio and Transmitter Units 



Little more than a year after going on the air, WSJS Television 
of Winston-Salem, N. C, has not only attracted a major share of 
the television audience in Piedmont N. C. as measured by inde- 
pendent surveys, but also has scored a "first in color." 



Harold Essex, Vice-Presi- 
dent and General Manager of 
the station, says : "a large part 
of this leadership is due to the 
fact that viewers are pleased 
with the high-quality pictures 
WSJS transmits." 

Ease and low cost of convert- 
ing to color with G-E wins the 
praise of Phil Hedrick, opera- 
tions manager for WSJS Tele- 
vision. He points out that very 
little modification was re- 
quired in either studio or 
transmitter equipment for 
network color transmission... 
and that nine months after 
going on the air, WSJS Tele- 
vision became the first station 
in the Southeast to telecast a 
color program. The date — June 
25, 1954 ; the program— NBC's 
first color film. 

WSJS Television now origi- 



nates a color pattern and plans 
to add other items to its pres- 
ent system for gradually en- 
tering the full range of color 
telecasting. 

WSJS Television obtained 
the first 8-bay transmitting 
antenna built by G.E., plus the 
following major items in its all- 
G-E set-up : a transmitter, 2000 
MC studio transmitter line, 
studio cameras, film cameras, 
slide projectors, switching, and 
other miscellaneous items. 

Since its first telecast on 
September 30, 1953, WSJS 
Television has operated at 
40,000 watts visual and 21.9 
kilowatts aural effective radi- 
ated power. 

Reports of good reception 
have come in from as far as 
100 miles away, including let- 
ters from Charlotte and Golds- 





Harold Essex (right) and Phil Hedrick (left), station executives read the interesting 
G-E booklet "Steps To Color" explaining easy, economical conversion to color TV. 



boro, N. C, and Roanoke, 
Virginia. Within the main 
coverage area are 24 counties 
with a total population of 
1,303,700 and an estimated 
245,000 TV sets. 

In the center of this cover- 
age lies North Carolina's 
"Golden Triangle" of Winston- 
Salem, Greensboro and High 
Point, with a total population 
of 367,000 — larger than metro- 
politan Oklahoma City. 

Looking back to that sum- 
mer of 1953 when WSJS Tele- 
vision was getting primed to 
go on the air, Operations Man- 
ager Hedrick has nothing but 
praise for the cooperation re- 
ceived from G-E Field Service 
and Field Engineers. 

"Those G-E men couldn't 
have turned in a more hard- 
working or faithful job if they 



had been on our own staff," 
Hedrick says. "We received 
FCC authorization on July 8. 
The first equipment came 
through on August 8 ; from 
then on the pressure was ter- 
rific to meet our deadline of 
September 30. We were mighty 
happy to have these G-E engi- 
neers sticking right with us on 
our night-and-day grind." 

Commenting on the experi- 
ence of this initial year, Gen- 
eral Manager Essex says, "We 
knew we could rely on the G-E 
trademark as a symbol of 
superb quality and steady per- 
formance — tops in the indus- 
try. And that G-E equipment 
really came through for us in 
this past year with a minimum 
of difficulties. We're counting 
on General Electric in all our 
plans for the future, too." 



Bill Paschal, Bruce Fleming, Nick Reisenwcavcr in a portion of video control room. 




Two General Electric cameras to catch 
the loveliness of singer Jean Houston. 



ELECTRIC 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 57 



91.7% of the rural families 
in our 41 counties 
listen MOST to 

WHAY I 






THE CITY FAVORITE, TOO! 

November, 1 954, Hoopers for Fargo* 
Moorhead show that WDAY gets 
more than three times as many day- 
time listeners as the next station! 



jVERY survey that's ever been made around 
these parts has shown the tremendous prefer- 
ence for WDAY. The latest, conducted by the 
Northwest Audit Company of Fargo, gives 
WDAY a lead of 32 to 1 over the next-best sta- 
tion and 11 to 1 over all other stations combined! 

A double postcard was mailed to 3,200 rural 
families living within 150 miles of Fargo, in all 



directions. Each was asked, "To what one radio 
station does your family listen the most?" 

Of the 1,681 replies, 1,541 said WDAY! 

The survey covered 41 counties in North 
Dakota, Minnesota and South Dakota, and gives 
you a good idea of the reception WDAY gets in 
this area. Get the facts from Free & Peters. 



WDAY 

FARGO, N. D. 




NBC • 5000 WATTS • 970 KILOCYCLES 

FREE & PETERS, INC., Exclusive National Representatives 



TRADE ASSNS. 



CONFERENCE TO FEATURE COST CUTS 



NARTB engineering exhibit 
emphasis will be on cutting 
costs and improving facilities. 
Walker, Beville are in charge 
of arrangements. 

I NARTB's Ninth Annual Engineering Confer- 
ence, meeting Wednesday-Thursday (May 25- 
26) during convention week in Washington, 
will show radio and tv stations how to cut 

I operating costs and improve facilities, accord- 
ing to A. Prose Walker, NARTB Engineering 
Dept. manager. Chairman of the conference 
program committee is Ross Beville, WWDC 

j Washington. 

Conference discussion will be "geared to 
reality," Mr. Walker said, with engineering de- 
velopments matched against FCC actions and 
policies as well as with station operation. 

Multiplexing of fm, ways of increasing fm 
station income and problems of FCC bandwidth 
proposals will be considered. Remote con- 
trol of high-power broadcast transmitters and 
directional antenna systems will be taken up in 
detail as well as modernizing of equipment to 
save space and money. 

Television topics include color film, network- 
ing, color studios, boosters and satellites, proof 
of performance, high-power transmissions, mi- 

I crowave and low-power tv stations. 

The opening day of the conference will be 
devoted to radio. Raymond F. Guy, NBC di- 
rector of radio frequency engineering, will pre- 
side in the morning and will deliver the opening 




MR. BEVILLE MR. WALKER 



address. Mr. Walker will discuss developments 
in remote control and field tests of gear de- 
signed for high-power and directional stations. 
Philip Smaller, Ampex Corp. research engineer, 
will review automatic programming systems. 
Norbert L. Jochem, Gates Radio Co. engineer- 
ing director, will speak on improved designs 

I for broadcast audio equipment. 

Use of transistors in remote amplifiers will 
be covered by Paul G. Wulfsberg, assistant di- 
rector of engineering and research, Collins Ra- 
dio Co. Thomas J. Merson, vice president of 
Audio- Video Recording Co., will talk on ways 
of improving tape and disc recording. Final 
talk of the morning session will be that of 
Everett S. Lee, technical public relations man- 
ager of General Electric Co., speaking on "The 
Engineer, The Builder." 

Radio papers will be delivered in the after- 

| noon of the first conference day by Dr. Leo 

j L. Beranek, president of Bolt, Beranek & New- 
man, discussing acoustics measurements and 
studio re-design, and by Charles J. Starner, 
design engineer of RCA broadcast transmitter 
section, speaking on operation and economics 

j of phase to amplitude modulation in am broad- 
cast transmitters. Mr. Starner's topic involves 
use of receiving type tubes up to the final 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



amplifying stage in transmitters, with savings 
in costs and space. 

Two panels are scheduled the same after- 
noon. Mr. Walker will moderate a panel on fm 
broadcasting, covering its growing pains and 
expansion strains. Participants include John H. 
Bose, staff engineer, Electronics Research Lab, 
Columbia U.; William Halstead, president, 
Multiplex Development Corp.; Stanley Joseloff, 
president, Storecast Corp. of America, and Mr. 
Beville. 

Impact of FCC bandwidth proposals on 
operating costs will be taken up by a panel 
headed by Robert E. L. Kennedy, of Kear & 
Kennedy. Panel members will be Ernest W. 
Pappenfus, assistant director, engineering and 
research, Collins Radio Co.; James O. Weldon, 
president, Continental Electronics Mfg. Co.; 
A. Earl Cullum Jr., consultant; Fred Damm, 
transmitter design engineer, Gates Radio Co.; 
Harold G. Towlson, manager, broadcast trans- 
mitter engineering, General Electric Co.; John 
E. Young, manager, broadcast transmitter en- 
gineering section, RCA; Ralph N. Harmon, vice 
president for engineering, Westinghouse Broad- 
casting Co. 

Glenn C. Boundy, engineering director of 
Storer Broadcasting Co., will preside at the 
morning session on Television Day, May 26. 
The morning agenda includes these papers: 
"Advancements in Color Film and Slide Pro- 
gramming," Fred F. Bartlett, Philco Corp. sales 
engineering supervisor, broadcast products; 
"Conversion of Iconoscope Chains to Vidicon 
Operation," Joseph W. Belcher, General Pre- 
cision Labs; "General Characteristics of Color 
Television Displays," Bernard D. Loughlin, 
consultant, Hazeltine Corp.; "Network Trans- 
mission of Monochrome and Color Tv," James 
R. Rae, general methods engineer, AT&T; "A 
CBS-TV Color Studio," Robert B. Monroe, 
CBS-TV senior project engineer; "Integration of 
Color Equipment and Existing Monochrome 
Installations," by a panel including three men 
from the RCA broadcast transmitters section — 
Anthony H. Lind, manager, broadcast audio 
and tv projector engineering; Lannes E. Ander- 
son, tv systems engineering, and Nils J. Oman, 
development engineer. 

Design Problems 

A three-man panel will take up problems of 
design, construction and operation. Dr. George 
Brown, RCA systems branch laboratory direc- 
tor, will cover design problems. Benjamin Ad- 
ler, Adler Communications Labs, will handle 
construction. Eugene E. Overmeier, commercial 
engineering manager, Sylvania Electric Prod- 
ucts, will speak on operations. 

Presiding at the afternoon session will be 
James L. Middlebrooks, engineering director, 
KING -TV Seattle. Papers include: "A Review 
of Color Encoding Principles," Robert Deichert, 
of the color research department, Allen B. Du- 
Mont Labs; "Proof of Performance Measure- 
ments for a Vhf Tv Station," Richard K. Black- 
burn, WHEC-TV Rochester technical director, 
and Bernard C. O'Brien, WHEC-TV chief 
engineer. 

Frank J. Bias, uhf supervisor, transmitter 
engineering, General Electric Co., will speak on 
the topic, "Achieving One Megawatt ERP at 
Uhf." Richard C. McLaughlin, assistant man- 
ager of communications products planning, 
Raytheon Mfg. Co., will discuss "Considera- 
tions of Microwave Installations." Final topic 
of the conference is "A Low-Power Television 
Station for $50,000," by F. Dan Meadows, gen- 
eral sales manager, and Joseph W. Alinsky, 
chief engineer, Dage Tv Div., Thompson Prod- 
ucts. 




THE Television Bureau of Advertising signs 
a pact with A. C. Nielsen Co. for audience 
and marketing data. L to r: T. R. Shearer, 
Nielsen vice president; Oliver Treyz, TvB 
president, and Dr. Leon Arons, TvB re- 
search director. TvB will use Nielsen co- 
ordinated audience and commodity sales 
data in promotion of the medium. 



'JOURNAL 7 CHIDED BY SRA 
ON RADIO BILLING REPORT 

T. F. Flanagan, managing di- 
rector of Station Representa- 
tives Assn., criticizes omission 
of word 'network' in 'Wall 
Street Journal' headline on 
declining radio billings. 

FAR from "fading," radio is booming. But if 
a newspaper is going to headline a story on 
declining billings in radio, it should specify that 
it is talking about network radio, which is only 
a segment of the radio business. This is the 
gist of a letter sent to The Wall Street Journal 
by T. F. Flanagan, managing director of Station 
Representatives Assn., in protest to a front page 
article apearing in that paper March 21. 

That story was headlined as "Fading Radio." 
However, the article dealt with only the net- 
work phase, particularly on declining radio net- 
work gross billings and the prospect of drastic 
revisions such as that being proposed by NBC 
Radio in its planning of "Operation Redesign." 

The sub-head of the story read, "Listener 
and sponsor desertions spur some sharp re- 
shufflings." Mr. Flanagan emphatically pointed 
up that the headline would have been nearer 
accurate if it had said "Fading Network Radio" 
and if the word "network" again had been in- 
serted between "sharp" and "reshuffling" in the 
sub-head. Network time sales make up only 
the smallest of the three segments of radio 
business, Mr. Flanagan said, identifying the 
three as network, national spot and local retail. 

Mr. Flanagan said that local retail business in 
radio is estimated to have shown a slight in- 
crease in 1954 over the previous year and that 
national spot "at the best estimates" maintained 
its 1953 level in 1954. In 1953, he said, net- 
work grossed about $92.8 million, national spot, 
$129.6 million and local, $249.5 million. He 
said the wide differences in the volume of the 
three "would completely change your story. 
There was nothing in your . . . article which 
would indicate to businessmen that there are 
other sections of radio than network." "Net- 
work is only the tail of the radio business, and 
although the advertisers are chopping off a little 

April 4, 1955 • Page 59 



TRADE ASSNS. 



I 



piece of the tail from time to time, the animal 
is still very healthy," Mr. Flanagan said. 

While his letter pressed the differences be- 
tween network, local and spot, the SRA spokes- 
man later emphasized that his letter was not 
meant in any way to disparage network radio. 
On the contrary, he said, representatives hope 
to see network radio grow. He explained that 
successful spot advertisers become prospects 
for network radio, and that, conversely, success- 
ful network sponsors may also go into spot. 
What it narrows down to, he said, is that use 
of radio by any of the advertisers is advantage- 
ous to the medium and, in the long run, ad- 
vantageous to each of the three types. 

Mr. Flanagan told the Journal that it "could 
just as well have published a headline which 
said 'Radio is Booming'." He said this is so 
"in spite of all the inaccurate ratings that are 
published (the top researchers agree that radio 
is now so universal that it is too costly to 
measure completely). . . ." 

To emphasize radio's "boom," Mr. Flanagan 
included in his letter data on automobile radio, 
out-of-living-room, and teen-age listening; 
figures on radio stations licensed and in opera- 
tion, and radio sets in use. He summed up: 
"In fact, radio listening is on the increase, with 
a different pattern of personal individual listen- 
ing to programs transmitted from 12 to 24 
hours a day on radio stations." 

Mississippi Broadcasters 
Consider Code of Ethics 

PROPOSED code of ethics to guide broadcast- 
ers has been submitted to the membership of 
the Mississippi Broadcasters Assn. It was 
drawn up by Wiley Harris, WJDX-WLBT (TV) 
Jackson, as chairman of a special committee. 
Mr. Harris was presented a lifetime member- 
ship in MBA, along with Charles J. Wright Sr., 
WFOR Hattiesburg. 

New officers elected at the meeting, held last 
month in Vicksburg, were Ed Wilkerson, WSLI 
Jackson, president; Ray Butterfield, WLOX Bi- 
loxi, vice president, and Granville Walters, 
WAML Laurel, secretary-treasurer. 

The membership voted to amend its rules 
to permit member stations to pick whichever 
football games it wishes to broadcast, with fees 
fixed by the executive committee. The football 
committee has arranged broadcasts of college 
football games. 




NEW OFFICERS of the Mississippi Broad- 
casters Assn. are greeted by Bob Evans, 
WELO Tupelo, past president, at the 
March meeting. L to r: Ed Wilkerson, 
WSLI Jackson, president; Mr. Evans; Ray 
Butterfield, WLOX Biloxi, vice president, 
and Granville Walters, WAML Laurel, 
secretary-treasurer. 

Page 60 • April 4, 1955 



NARTB Arranging Program 
For Wives at Convention 

SPECIAL PROGRAM for entertainment of 
wives of radio-tv station executives attending 
the NARTB convention May 22-26 in Wash- 
ington has been arranged by the association. 
With over 2,500 delegates expected, plans are 
being made for approximately 500 wives. 

The program will include a May 24 noon 
fashion show and luncheon in the Shoreham 
Blue Room. Door prizes and favors will be 
presented. A Wednesday feature will be a 
daylight cruise aboard the SS Mount Vernon, 
which has been chartered for the trip. The ship 
will leave at 9:30 a.m., cruising to historic 
Mount Vernon. The return voyage includes 
luncheon. 

The women's program is being prepared by 
an arrangements committee, with Mrs. Harold 
E. Fellows, wife of the NARTB president, as 
chairman. 

Serving with Mrs. Fellows are Mrs. Ralph W. 
Hardy and Mrs. John F. Meagher, wives of the 
respective vice presidents for government rela- 
tions and radio. 

The following women serving on the hostess 
committee are wives of NARTB Convention Com- 
mittee members: Mrs. Henry B. Clay, KWKH 
Shreveport, La.; Mrs. Clair R. McCollough, 
WGAL-TV Lancaster, Pa.; Mrs. Campbell Arnoux, 
WTAR-TV Norfolk, Va.; Mrs. Kenyon Brown, 
KWFT Wichita Falls, Tex.; Mrs. Kenneth L. 
Carter; WAAM (TV) Baltimore; Mrs. E. K. 
Hartenbower, KCMO Kansas City; Mrs. James H. 
Moore, WSLS Roanoke, Va.; Mrs. Frank M. Rus- 
sell, NBC Washington; Mrs. Ben Strouse, WWDC 
Washington. 

NARTB staff liaison is being handled by 

Frank Riley, assistant manager of publicity 

and informational services, and Mrs. Louise K. 

Aldrich, librarian. 

More Station Editorials 
Foreseen in Fellows Talk 

TREND toward more broadcasting of station 
opinion on public issues was seen by Harold 
E. Fellows, NARTB president, in an address 
to the American Academy of Political & Social 
Sciences meeting April 1 in Philadelphia. 

Mr. Fellows recalled the history of the 
FCC's Mayflower decision and its "raised eye- 
brow" doctrine against expression of political 
opinion. The decision was abolished three years 
ago, with the FCC saying, in effect, "You may 
editorialize but you must give equal opportunity 
for reply by those holding opposite viewpoints." 

"Is even this freedom?" he asked the political 
science group. He noted similar restrictions are 
not applicable to printed media and added, 
"We cannot proceed from the argument that 
broadcasters are less responsible than pub- 
lishers, particularly in view of the fact that 
licensees are so thoroughly examined as to 
their personal, financial and civic capacities 
before they are franchised." 

Mr. Fellows said he separated the editorial 
function of the station from that of the com- 
mentator or analyst, and said most successful 
broadcasters try to balance commentaries to 
reflect every opinion. He said he does not be- 
lieve broadcasters "will waver in their obliga- 
tions to the people to report fairly and comment 
freely." 

RAB 'Best Sale' Trophy 
Won by WEBR Buffalo 

TROPHY for "Best Sale of the Month" was 
awarded for January to WEBR Buffalo, N. Y., 
Kevin Sweeney, president of Radio Advertising 
Bureau, announced last week. 

WEBR's winning effort was the sale of 25 
programs weekly to Delgato Appliance Inc. in 
Buffalo. The station's sales team in this effort 



included Bill Doerr, general manager; Carl 
Kirchhofer, sales director, and Robert Bartemus, 
account executive. Agency was Ellis Adv., 
Buffalo. All the programs were sold on a five- I 
day-a-week basis. 

Second place in the contest went to Neal ! 
Robbins of WKYW Louisville, Ky., who 
brought a new account into radio (Tri-City | 
Automotive Wholesalers Assn. on behalf of its | 
Certified Automotive Service Budget Plan). 

Sale of five 15-minute programs to a group 
of trailer dealers won Lou Gadeke of KGA 
Spokane, Wash., third place. 

RAB said entries based on March sales will 
be received at its headquarters — 270 Park Ave., 
New York — up to April 15. 

■; : ,W 

Kentucky Broadcasters Make 
First Annual 'Mike 7 Awards 

TRIBUTE was paid to nine persons for service 
to Kentucky Broadcasters Assn. at the annual 
KBA meeting held March 29 in Louisville, 
starting an annual presentation of "Kentucky 
Mike" awards. In the future the awards will 
be limited to one or two a year. 

Gilmore Nunn, WLAP Lexington, KBA first ! 
vice president, announced the award winners, j 
including Carl Haverlin, BMI; Sal Taishoff, 
editor and publisher of B«T; F. E. Lackey, | 
WHOP Hopkinsville, NARTB District 7 direc- 
tor; Hugh O. Potter, WOMI Owensboro, KBA 
secretary-treasurer; Ray Livesay, WLBH Mat- 
toon, 111., and Bill Ladd, radio editor, Louisville 
Courier-Journal. Messrs. Haverlin and Livesay 
were speakers at last week's meeting. 

KBA's autumn meeting will be held Oct. 
13-14 in Lexington. The 56 stations that took 
part in the month-long KBA safety campaign 
in March carried an estimated 17,000 announce- i 
ments, along with programs. Col. Charles C. 
Oldham, commissioner of state police and chair- 
man of the governor's coordinating traffic 
safety committee, praised efforts of broadcasters 
to reduce accidents and said the rising death 
rate appeared to have been arrested. 

III. News Groups Discuss 
Libel, Equal News Access 

EQUAL ACCESS to news for all media and 
a discussion of libel proposals before the Illi- j 
nois and Indiana state legislatures highlighted 
back-to-back freedom of information clinics of 
the Illinois News Broadcasters Assn. and Asso- | 
ciated Press in Springfield Friday and Satur- 
day (April 1-2). 

INBA, the Illinois Broadcasters Assn. and 
Sigma Delta Chi, national professional journal- 
ism fraternity, sponsored the AP freedom of i 
information clinic. 

Sen. George Drach, Illinois Senate majority 
whip, followed up his talk before the Illinois 
Broadcasters Assn. March 25 with a plea Satur- 
day for INBA support of his proposed bill to 
liberalize libel laws with respect to statements 
uttered by political candidates. His proposal 
would cover both civil and criminal libel under 
Illinois law. It would protect broadcasters 
against civil as well as criminal damages. A 
report was given on a bill in Indiana which was 
passed and vetoed. 

The AP clinic involved discussions of news 
at the police, FBI, sheriff and other enforce- 
ment levels and contacts with the Army and 
Navy. Basil L. Walters, executive editor, 
Chicago Daily News, was scheduled to preside 
over the opening session, which included Wil- 
liam Small, WLS Chicago and INBA head, as 
a panelist. Robert Guess, news director, WLBH 
Mattoon, appeared on another panel. ji 

Rep. Paul Simon, Illinois legislature member 

Broadcasting • Telecasting » 






...the Low-Down on the 
UPPER OHIO VALLEY! 



Wheels are whirring in the Wheeling-Steubenville market- 
aptly called "the rich Ruhr Valley of America." This is a major market 
with an abundance of natural resources and fuel; a plentiful supply of 
manpower has attracted and continues to attract more big industry. 

The industry is diversified, including steel, steel fabricating, 
chemicals, pottery, glassware, paint, toys, tobacco and textiles. . •*»' 

Smart advertisers have learned the best medium to reach 
this rich market effectively and at the lowest cost per thousand is 
WTRF-TV, Wheeling, West Va. Within its coverage area there are 397,000 
families consisting of 1,399,800 people, owning 304,778 television sets. 
The combined annual spendable income of this market is $1,980,105,000 
or an average of $5,631 per household, $357 more than the national average. 

WTRF-TV operates with 316,000 watts on channel 7, broad- 
casting 120 hours of programming a week including top NBC and ABC 
shows, supplemented by local originations of widespread interest. Every 
Telepulse survey made in the Wheeling-Steubenville area has given 
WTRF-TV a sweeping majority, the latest indicating that 63.5% of the 
tuned in audience between 12 noon and midnight dialed channel 7. 

When planning any television campaign intended to pene- 
trate the major markets of America, remember the "Ruhr Valley of 
America" and the best medium to reach it— WTRF-TV. For availabilities 
call Holli ngbery or Bob Ferguson, VP and General Manager, Wheeling 1177. 

These ore but a few of the national and internationally 
known enterprises located in the Wheeling-Steubenville Area* 





Bloch Bros. Tobacco Co. 
Columbia Southern Chemical 
Corp. 

Continental Foundry & Machine 
Co. 

Follansbee Steel Corp. 
Fostoria Glass Co. 



Hammond Bag & Paper Co. 
Harker Pottery Co. 
Hazel-Atlas Glass Corp. 
Wheeling Machine Products Co. 
Imperial Glass Corp. 
Kaiser Motors Corp. 
Louis Marx Toy Co. 



WTRF-TV 



Channel 



National Analine 

J. L. Stifel & Sons, Textiles 

Sylvania Electric Products, Inc. 

U. S. Stamping Co. 

Weirton Steel Co. 

Wheeling Corrugating Co. 

Wheeling Steel Corp. 



316,000 Watts 



TRADE ASSNS. 



WHEELING, WEST VIRGINIA 



Equipped for network color 




and publisher of the Troy (111.) Tribune, dis- 
cussed his "Right to Know" bill, which some 
newsmen questioned as impractical because of 
certain reservations. It proposes to open all 
meetings of legislative bodies and local agencies 
to all media. 

INBA was scheduled Saturday to adopt a 
resolution praising Illinois State Sen. T. Mac- 
Downing for opening up the 111. Senate Judiciary 
Committee sessions to broadcast recording and 
camera coverage [B»T, March 28, 21]. It also 
was slated to choose a board replacement for 
the late Brooks Watson, news director of 
WMBD Peoria. 

Among scheduled speakers Saturday were 
Harold Dewing, WCVS Springfield, IBA presi- 
dent; Glen Farrington, WTAX Springfield, and 
Al Rowe, WSOY Decatur. 

RTES Panel Analyzes 
Religious Programming 

DIVERSIFICATION of religious programming 
was stressed in a panel discussion Wednesday 
on "Religion on Radio and Tv" during a work- 
shop luncheon in New York by the Radio & 
Television Executives Society. 

Speakers included Dr. S. Franklin Mack, 
executive director, Broadcasting & Film Com- 
mission, National Council of Churches of 
Christ, U. S. A.; Rabbi Bernard Mandelbaum, 
Jewish Theological Seminary, program and 
script supervisor for the Jewish portion of 
Frontiers of Faith, and Richard Walsh, di- 
rector of tv, National Council of Catholic Men. 
Albert Crews, tv director of the Broadcasting 
& Film Commission, was moderator. 

Mr. Walsh acknowledged that sponsorship of 
religious programming, such as Bishop Sheen's 
Life Is Worth Living on DuMont, may be the 
partial answer to the current "problem" and 
need of church groups for additional network 
time. He also said local religious programming 
is not as extensive on tv a& in radio because 
of the higher production cost involved. Each 
speaker noted, however, that they are making 
use of, or plan to use, tv film for local dis- 
tribution. 

Dr. Mack said two yardsticks for religious 
programming were (1) it must be good, and 
(2) it must also be acceptable to church "con- 
stituents." 

Dr. Mack said that much experimentation 
is being done in programming, particularly in 
tv, in the process of learning more about meth- 
ods of using the broadcast media. He said the 
commission is encouraging such experimenta- 
tion on the local level, asserting that it is gen- 
erally recognized that the "future of religious 
broadcasting" rests in the local community. 

Rabbi Mandelbaum reviewed the seminary's 
experience with the broadcast media, asserting 
that it has been concerned more with the form 
that religious radio should take. He said that 
program development has arrived at the point 
wherein the dramatic presentation is the most 
effective in keeping the message general and 
the best in "getting the point across." 

NARTB Am Members 1,200, 
Total Enrollment 1,916 

AM STATION membership of NARTB has 
passed the 1,200 mark as a result of the cur- 
rent campaign to enroll stations, according to 
President Harold E. Fellows. Total member- 
ship, 1,916, now includes 1,201 am stations, 
326 fm stations, 265 tv stations, three radio 
networks, four tv networks and 117 associates. 

The campaign is under direction of Richard 
M. Brown, KPOJ Portland, Ore., chairman of 
NARTB's Membership Committee. William 



Page 62 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting 



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April 4, 1955 • Page 63 



TRADE ASSNS, 



GOVERNMENT 



FCC INITIATES FIRST MOVE 
TOWARD DE-INTERMIXTURE 

Comments asked on proposal to de-intermix in four cities: Evansville, 
Hartford, Peoria and Madison, which would become all-uhf. Hen- 
nock's dissent claims de-intermixture should get full study. 



K. Treynor, station relations manager, heads the 
staff team comprising Jack Barton, assistant 
manager, and William Carlisle and Al King, 
field men. The campaign began in mid-Feb- 
ruary and will last through early May. District 
directors are directing teams in each state. 

On the membership group, besides Chair- 
man Brown, are Kenneth L. Carter, WAAM 
(TV) Baltimore; Cy Casper, WBBZ Ponca City, 
Okla.; Henry B. Clay, KWKH Shreveport, La.; 
John Esau, KTVQ (TV) Oklahoma City; Lester 
L. Gould, WJNC Jacksonville, N. C; J. Frank 
Jarman, WDNC Durham, N. C, and F. Ernest 
Lackey, WHOP Hopkinsville, Ky. 

Godfrey, Nelson, Haase 
Elected to New AAAA Posts 

APPOINTMENTS of Kenneth Godfrey and 
August Nelson as vice presidents of the Amer- 
ican Assn. of Advertising Agencies and Walter 
Haase as executive secretary-treasurer were an- 
nounced last week by Frederic R. Gamble, 
president. The appointments have been ap- 
proved by the operations committee of the 
AAAA board of directors. 

Messrs. Godfrey and Nelson had been senior 
executives on the staff at AAAA headquarters 
in New York. Mr. Haase formerly was assistant 
secretary-treasurer. 

Richard L. Scheidker and Richard Turnbull 
continue as AAAA vice presidents, appointed in 
1948. 

Nat/I. Audience Board Sets 
Tv Commercials Award Unit 

STRUCTURE to review tv commercials and 
make periodic awards to advertising agencies 
and broadcasting firms was set up in Hollywood 
last week by the National Audience Board, 
civic group which recently established a pre- 
viewing and reviewing system for tv programs 
[B*T, March 14]. 

A commercial awards advisory committee, 
consisting of representatives of 22 local and 
regional civic and cultural groups, will hear 
and vote on selected commercials submitted to 
it. 

TRADE ASSN. PEOPLE 

Sidney Justin, resident counsel, Paramount Pic- 
tures, Hollywood, elected president, Los Angeles 
Copyright Society, organization specializing in 
radio-tv, motion picture, entertainment copy- 
right law. Also elected were Frank H. Fergu- 
son, resident counsel, 20th Century-Fox, vice 
president, and Melville B. Nimmer, Paramount 
attorney, secretary-treasurer. Elected to board 
of trustees: George W. Cohen, outgoing presi- 
dent; Louis E. Swarts; Joseph S. Dubin; C. E. 
Erkel; Richard W. Jencks; Gunther Lessing; 
Robert Myers, George F. Wasson Jr., and Lau- 
rence M. Weinberg. 

H. B. Price Jr., president, National Appliance 
& Radio-Tv Dealers Assn., to address luncheon 
meeting of Rocky Mountain Electrical League 
at Denver Press Club April 18. 

Harold Adamson, Milton Ager, Harry Akst, 
George Antheil, M. K. Jerome and Bronislau 
Kaper named by nominating committee, Ameri- 
can Society of Composers, Authors and Pub- 
lishers (ASCAP), to run for three-year West 
Coast committee terms against incumbents 
L. Wolfe Gilbert, Johnny Green, Jimmy Mc- 
Hogh, Leo Robin, William Grant Still and 
Harry Warren, all automatically renominated. 



FIRST move toward possible tv de-intermixture 
— making a city all vhf or all uhf — was taken 
by the FCC last week. 

It issued notices of rule making calling for 
comments on four proposals to de-intermix — 
Evansville, Ind.; Hartford, Conn.; Madison, 
Wis., and Peoria, 111. 

The proposals also involve Providence, R. I.; 
Hatfield, Ind., and' Rockford, 111. 

None of the four cities has vhf stations oper- 
ating within their boundaries or granted at 
present. 

Proposals to de-intermix in all four com- 
munities call for the switch of the educational 
reservation from uhf to the single vhf channel, 
making each of them all-uhf, commercially. 

Hearings among competitive applicants for 
each of the single vhf channels in the four 
cities have been held. In three instances, an 
initial decision has been issued. 

In all four instances, proposals to de-inter- 
mix had been denied once by the Commission, 
but in each case petitions for reconsideration 
were on file. 

The orders call for comments by May 2 with 
replies due 10 days later. The FCC said it will 
hold oral arguments after the comments and 
replies are received. 

FCC Comr. Frieda B. Hennock dissented to 
each of the actions. She declared that de- 
intermixture was a national problem and should 
be the subject of a full study. She called for a 
"nationwide reallocation plan," as she has done 
before. 

In other de-intermixture areas, the Com- 
mission also last week called for comments by 
April 29 on a Louisiana Board of Education 
proposal to shift the educational reservation 
from ch. 43 to unsought ch. 13 in Monroe, La. 

Move Follows Comment To Senate 

The FCC's move came three weeks after it 
told the Senate Commerce Committee that it 
was considering "selective" de-intermixture. 
This was in its response to the Plotkin and 
Jones reports [B»T, March 21]. 

Still pending before the Commission are 
petitions asking for de-intermixture of New 
Orleans and Baton Rouge, La.; Corpus Christi, 
Tex.; Albany-Schenectady-Troy, N. Y., and 
Lexington, Ky. 

In asking for comments, FCC specified sim- 
ilar issues in each case. These involved: 

• Grades A and B contours of presently 
operating uhf stations and of the proposed vhf 
stations. 

• Number of families receiving service from 
operating and proposed stations, including 
fringe homes. 

• Number of receivers, including those able 
to receive uhf. 

• Time spent by viewers watching stations 
outside the service areas of the four cities. 

• Areas and populations which would lose 
service by the change in allocation. 

• Information regarding network affiliations 
and use of network programs, contract terms, 
possibilities of uhf stations retaining network 
affiliation in event vhf station begins operating. 

Evansville is allocated chs. 7, 50, 56 and 62. 
Ch. 7 is being sought by Evansville Tv Inc., 
WGBF and WEOA of that city. Last October 



an initial decision was issued favoring Evans- 
ville Tv Inc. Ch. 50 is held by WEHT (TV) 
Henderson, Ky. (in the Evansville market area), 
which is the CBS affiliate. Ch. 62 is held by 
WFIE (TV) Evansville, affiliated with, NBC, 
ABC and DuMont. 

Petition of the two uhf stations to shift the 
educational reservation to the vhf channel was 
filed last fall. Early this year, the FCC denied 
the petition following objections by the three 
vhf applicants. Early in February, a petition 
for reconsideration was filed by the two uhf 
stations, which also suggested that ch. 9 be 
deleted from Hatfield, Ind., and replaced by 
ch. 14 from Henderson, Ky. Hatfield's ch. 9 
is sought by WVJS and WOMI Owensboro, 
Ky., with hearing closed last January. 

Hartford is allocated chs. 3, 18 and 24. Ch. 
3 is the goal of two applicants, WTIC Hartford 
and Hartford Telecasting Co. No initial deci- 
sion has yet been issued. Ch. 18 is held by 
WGTH-TV Hartford, the ABC and DuMont 
affiliate. Educational ch. 24 is held by the 
Connecticut State Board of Education. 

Four Connecticut River Valley uhf stations 
last October asked that the Hartford educa- 
tional reservation be switched from ch. 24 to 
ch. 3. They are WGTH-TV; WKNB-TV New 
Britain, NBC affiliated; WHYN-TV and WWLP 
(TV) Springfield, Mass., the CBS and NBC- 
ABC affiliates, respectively. The FCC denied 
this proposal last December and in January 
the four uhf stations asked for reconsideration. 
The two vhf applicants opposed this move. 

Three weeks ago, ch. 16 WNET (TV) Provi- 
dence, R. I., petitioned the FCC to move Hart- 
ford's ch. 3 to Westerly, R. I., 35 miles outside 
of Providence. The CBS and ABC affiliated 
uhf station has been in litigation with the FCC 
involving its protest against the grant of Prov- 
idence's ch. 12 to WPRO-TV there. The case 
is scheduled to be argued in the Court of Ap- 
peals in Washington today (Monday). Provi- 
dence also has pre-freeze ch. 10 WJAR-TV, 
affiliated with all four networks. 

The Providence station's proposal was op- 
posed last week by Hartford ch. 3 applicant 
WTIC. 

Madison Channels Surveyed 

Madison is allocated chs. 3, 21, 27 and 33. 
Ch. 3 is the object of a hearing between WISC 
of that city and Badger Tv Co. An initial de- 
cision in favor of Badger was issued in August 
1954. Ch. 21 is held by educational WHA-TV. 
Ch. 27 is held by WKOW-TV, affiliated with 
CBS. Ch. 33 is held by WMTV (TV), affiliated 
with NBC, ABC and DuMont. 

Petition to move the educational reservation 
from ch. 21 to ch. 3 was filed a year ago by 
WKOW-TV. It was denied last fall, and in 
February WKOW-TV asked for reconsideration. 
The vhf applicants opposed the petition. 

Last week, ch. 39 WTVO (TV) Rockford, 
111., asked the FCC to move ch. 3 from Madison 
and assign it to Beloit, Wis., 15 miles from 
Rockford. WTVO also asked that it be per- 
mitted to move to Beloit using ch. 3. The Rock- 
ford station said it lost $100,000 in 1954. It 
competes with ch. 13 WREX-TV in Rockford. 
WTVO is affiliated with NBC and DuMont; 
WREX-TV with CBS and ABC. 

If the Commission cannot move ch. 3 to 



Page 64 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



In DefroiLthe Town that's Baseball Batty 




broadcasts 
the Play-by-Play 




From early Spring to late Fall the minds of 
Detroiters swing to baseball! And, they just 
naturally tune to WKMH, the station that 
brings the baseball games every afternoon 
or night on the Detroit Tiger schedule. Just 
one more example of how you cash in on 
the station that gives Detroiters what they 
want to hear the most! 




WKMH 



Dearborn -Detroit 

FREDERICK A. KNORR, Pres. 
GEORGE MILLAR, Mg. Director 

Represented by Headley-Reed 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 65 



GOVERNMENT 



COMMENTS SOUGHT ON FCC'S PROPOSAL 
TO PERMIT CO-CHANNEL UHF BOOSTERS 



Beloit, WTVO said, then ch. 13 should be 
moved to Aurora or Elgin, 111., and ch. 51 
should be added to Rockford. 

Peoria is allocated chs. 8, 19, 37 and 43. 
Ch. 8 is in contest between WIRL and WMBD 
Peoria, with an initial decision outstanding in 
favor of WIRL. 

Ch. 19 is held by WTVH-TV, the CBS and 
ABC affiliate. Ch. 43 is held by WEEK-TV, 
affiliated with NBC and DuMont. 

The two uhf stations suggested last Septem- 
ber that the educational reservation be switched 
from the uhf ch. 37 to ch. 8. In November last 
year the Commission denied this, and in De- 
cember the uhf outlet filed for reconsideration. 
The two vhf applicants filed objections. 

Latest de-intermixture petition was filed last 
week by WICS (TV) Springfield, 111. Operating 
on ch. 20, NBC affiliated, the Springfield station 
suggested that the educational reservation be 
changed from a uhf channel to the sole vhf 
channel allocated there. Springfield is allocated 
chs. 2, 20 and 66, with the last reserved for 
educational use. Two competing applicants for 
Springfield's ch. 2 are Sangamon Valley Tv 
Corp. and WMAY-TV Inc. The former was 
favored in an initial decision issued last De- 
cember. 

The move. WICS said, would make all of 
central Illinois uhf, tieing in with the Peoria 
petition. If that cannot be done, WICS said, 
then ch. 2 should be added to St. Louis and 
ch. 41 should be used in Springfield. 

Roanoke Vhf Grant Finalized; 
Flint Stay Petitions Denied 

FINAL decision to grant ch. 7 at Ronoake, Va., 
to Times-World Corp.'s WDBJ there, was an- 
nounced by FCC last week, making it the sec- 
ond vhf station in that market. Already operat- 
ing is ch. 10 WSLS-TV, ABC and NBC affiliate. 

Grant of ch. 7 to WDBI was made possible 
by the dismissal of a competitive application 
by WROV Roanoke. WDBJ bought the tv 
assets of defunct ch. 27 WROV-TV for 
$245,000. 

In other tv hearing actions, FCC turned 
down petitions by WFDF Flint, Mich., and 
W. S. Butterfield Theatres Inc. which requested 
reargument and stay of the Commission's final 
decision of May 14, 1954, granting ch. 12 at 
Flint to WJR Detroit. 

Oral argument was scheduled for April 25 
on an examiner's initial decision to grant ch. 
29 at Canton, Ohio, to Tri-Cities Telecasting 
Inc. The examiner proposed denial of com- 
petitive bids by WHBC and WCMW there. 



FCC plan is another move to- 
wards bolstering uhf develop- 
ment. May 20 has been set as 
deadline for comments. 

MOVING in still another area to spur uhf 
development, FCC last week called for com- 
ments by May 20 on a new proposal to author- 
ize co-channel uhf booster stations to fill in 
the shadow areas of the parent uhf station. 
FCC's term for a booster is "amplifying trans- 
mitter." 

The Commission concurrently proposed de- 
intermixture of uhf and vhf channels in four 
principal markets in an effort to remedy uhf s 
ills (story, page 64). Last week it also was 
receiving comments on its proposal to allow 
low-power tv stations (both uhf and vhf) in 
small cities (story page 69). 

Already in effect is FCC's policy to consider 
on a case-by-case basis applications for satel- 
lites. While a booster outlet would operate on 
the same channel as the parent station and is 
intended for uhf only, the satellite operates on 
a different channel, usually that already al- 
located to the area in which the satellite is 
located, and may be either uhf or vhf. 

To help determine whether its rules should 
be amended to allow booster operation, FCC 
requested comments on booster equipment and 
costs, any effect on color or monochrome trans- 
missions, minimum separations between boost- 
ers and parent or other transmitters, interfer- 
ence safeguards, plans of proponents, hours of 
operation, remote control operation and other 
technical considerations. 

In its notice, FCC said it "has been con- 
cerned with how it can best insure the fullest 
development of the television industry's poten- 
tialities in line with the needs and desires of 
the American public and the abilities and in- 
genuity of the American broadcasters. 

"The Commission has noted in this connec- 
tion that there are substantial obstacles pres- 
ently hindering the bringing of a first television 
service to many small communities as well as 
the expanding of multiple, competing services 
in larger economic and population centers. 
One of the major obstacles is the failure of 
uhf stations, thus far, to become fully integrated 



with established vhf stations into an economic- 
ally sound, nationwide television service." 

The Commission cited its preliminary report 
on uhf to the Senate Interstate and Foreign 
Commerce Committee [B«T, March 21] con- 
cerning specific actions "calculated to enhance 
the potentialities for television's growth within 
the existing allocation system. The Commis- 
sion expressed its view that the only practicable 
course of action lies in doing what is possible 
to promote the present allocation plan utilizing 
both vhf and uhf channels." 

FCC explained that compared with vhf, "the 
signals from uhf transmitters have less tendency 
to fill in areas which are not in direct line of 
sight with the transmitting antenna. Conse- 
quently, there are areas which, although lying 
within the area that would normally be served 
by a uhf station, are effectively 'shadowed' by 
intervening terrain and are thereby deprived 
of service. 

"One means of providing uhf television 
coverage in such shadow areas may be the use 
of amplifying transmitters operating on the 
same channel as the main transmitter and de- 
pendent upon the main transmitter for the gen- 
eration of carrier frequencies and modulation." 

The notice related successful booster experi- 
ments conducted at Vicksburg, Miss., by RCA 
in conjunction with ch. 25 WJTV (TV) Jackson, 
Miss. [B»T, Aug. 30, 2, 1954]; Adler Com- 
munications Labs., at Waterbury, Conn. [B*T, 
Dec. 20, 1954]; Sylvania Electric Products Inc. 
at Emporium, Pa. [B«T, Sept. 21, 1953], and 
WSM-TV Nashville at Lawrenceburg, Tenn. 
[B»T, June 7, 1954; Nov. 9, 1953]. 

FCC also observed that the Radio-Elec- 
tronics-Television Mfrs. Assn., has established 
a committee to study the general problem and 
has submitted an interim report. 

The Commission said it desires that the com- 
ments submitted in the proceeding present in- 
formation and data with respect to the following 
aspects of amplifying transmitter operation: 

(a) Complete technical data with respect to 
amplifying transmitters and associated equipment 
and operation, including full information as to the 
complexity and dependability of amplifiers, an- 
tennas, etc. 

(b) Data with respect to the extent, if any, of 
the degradation caused by operation of amplify- 
ing transmitters on color or monochrome signals 
and what changes, additions or deletions would 
be required in the Commission's rules to establish 
minimum separations (1) between the amplifying 
transmitters and the main transmitters; (2) be- 
tween amplifying transmitters of the same main 
station; (3) between amplifying transmitters of 
different main stations, both co-channel and ad- 
jacent channel; and (4) between amplifying 
transmitters of one station and the transmitters 
of a station not having amplifying transmitters. 

(c) Data relating to the cost of equipment for 
such operation, including installation and main- 
tenance. 

(d) Information with respect to the technical 
specifications required to assure that only the 
authorized television channel would be amplified 
by the amplifying transmitters. 

(e) Information as to the technical specifica- 
tions required to assure linear rebroadcast of the 
signal and to protect against the radiation of 
spurious signals resulting from internal cross 
modulation or self oscillation. 

(f) Information with respect to plans and pro- 
posals of interested persons who intend to engage 
in such operation. 

(g) What hours of operation should be required 
of amplifying transmitters? 

(h) Whether amplifying transmitters should be 
permitted to operate unattended; and if so, under 
what conditions. 

(i) What is the maximum distance from the 
main transmitter that amplifying transmitters 
should be permitted? 

(j) What minimum power and antenna height 
requirements should be established for amplify- 
ing transmitter operation? 

(k) What requirements should be provided for 



Indians Had TeePee, Not TeeVee 



NATIONAL parks may have fine tv sites, 
but raising towers there can wreck imagina- 
tion of youngsters wanting to re-live cowboy- 
and-Indian days. That's how FCC explained 
it to young Wally Marcellus of Scottsbluff, 
Neb., who wrote President Eisenhower ask- 
ing why new ch. 10 KSTF (TV) couldn't 
build atop The Bluffs. 

FCC's explanation (written by an engi- 
neer, not a lawyer) said: 

Actually, the television station has already 
been given a permit to build its tower at 
another location which should give good tele- 
vision reception to the people in Scottsbluff. 
But the station wanted to use The Bluffs be- 
cause it would let them provide television to 
a lot of people outside of Scottsbluff. We 
would like to encourage them to do this, but 
unfortunately, The Bluffs cannot be used for 
this purpose. 

As you know, The Bluffs were used by the 
early settlers to watch for Indians and were 



very important to the early development of 
your part of the country. The land has been 
set aside as a National Monument to preserve 
it in its original state so that you and your 
friends can go up there and see the land just 
as the pioneers did. When you grow up and 
marry, you can take your little boy up there 
too, and tell him the story of the Indians and 
the pioneers and it will be just as it was when 
there were really wild Indians around. 

If a television tower were built there, it 
would sort of spoil it a little because we 
know there were no television towers there 
when the settlers came. Then people might 
build electric lines and highways, and hot dog 
stands and pretty soon it would look just like 
any other part of the country, and you 
couldn't go to The Bluffs and imagine that 
you were living back in the days of the 
Indians. 

When you grow up, you will appreciate 
more the importance of keeping some parts 
of your country as they were in early days, so 
that they will be a monument to the people 
that braved the dangers of the wilderness to 
settle this country of ours. Thank you for 
writing to the President. 



Pagei66 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



The symbol of 

TOP TELEVISION 
in New England's 
BIG THREE Market 



The "Big Three"— Providence, FaU River and New 
Bedford — together comprise the nation's 14th mar- 
ket, a billion dollar retail sales area. 

In this market the familiar call letters WPRO 
have long stood for the best in radio, with the largest 
listening audience in the area. 

Now WPRO-TV brings to this audience the best 
in TV from CBS Television and local originations 
over Channel 12, continuing a long tradition of 
community service. 

WPRO-TV is owned and operated by the Cherry 
& Webb Broadcasting Company. 



Represented exclusively by 



BLAIR 



New York • Chicago • Detroit • San Francisco • Boston 
Dallas • St. Louis • Jacksonville • Los Angeles • Seattle 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 67 



Advertisement 



Oil and Man's Quest 
for Freedom 



By COURTNEY C. BROWN, Ph. D. 

Dean, Graduate School of Business, 
Columbia University 



Over the centuries man's ef- 
forts to live better and, at the 
same time, enjoy more leisure, 
have been part of his quest for 
freedom to develop culturally and 
politically. In earlier years the few 
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the many. As time has gone by, 
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Wind, animals, wood, water, 
coal, natural gas and petroleum 
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our modern way of life possible. 
The petroleum industry is en- 
titled to a proud place in this pro- 
gression of sources of energy. In 
the last half century its contribu- 
tion to energizing the world's 
work, and making it more mobile, 
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America's oil industry, with its 
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Questions of national interest on 
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This is one of a series of reports by outstanding Americans on the U.S. oil industry. 
This page is presented for your information by 
The American Petroleum Institute, 50 West 50th Street, New York 20, N. Y. 




Page 68 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



station identification of amplifying transmitters? 

(1) Whether amplifying transmitters should be 
required to maintain a minimum field strength 
over a specific area? 

(m) Whether amplifying transmitters should 
be required, or permitted, to employ vertical 
polarization? 

(n) Whether (1) the number of amplifying trans- 
mitters should be limited in any particular area; 
(2) the number of amplifying transmitters op- 
erating in conjunction with a particular main 
station should be limited; and (3) whether and 
by what manner the rules governing multiple 
ownership of television broadcast stations should 
apply to the operation of such amplifying 
transmitters? 

(o) Whether any technical standards prescribed 
by the rules should be amended for such op- 
eration, and how the standards should be so 
amended? 

Asking for comments by May 20, FCC said 
comments or briefs in reply to such original 
comments as may be submitted should be filed 
within 20 days from the last day for filing said 
original comments or briefs. "No additional 
comments may be filed unless (1) specifically 
requested by the Commission or (2) good cause 
for filing such additional comments is estab- 
lished. The Commission will consider all such 
additional comments submitted before taking 
further action in this matter, and if any com- 
ments appear to warrant the holding of a hear- 
ing, oral argument, or demonstration, notice of 
the time and place of such hearing, oral argu- 
ment or demonstration will be given." 

FCC Gets Mixed Comments 
On Low-Power Tv Proposal 

MIXED COMMENTS were filed last week to 
the FCC's proposal to permit low-powered, 
100-w tv stations in communities with popula- 
tions below 50,000. 

Adler Communications Labs, New Rochelle, 
N. Y., said it was in full accord with the ob- 
jectives of Sylvania Electric Co.'s petition re- 
garding the establishment of satellite tv stations 
filed last year [B«T, Sept. 21, 1953] and also 
with comments of RETMA. 

Adler reported that for the past year-and-a- 
half it has been conducting experimental work 
in low power tv. The company said it has re- 
ceived a large number of inquiries from existing 
tv and am stations, dealers and others interested 
in establishing low-powered tv stations for the 
purpose of extending tv service into areas not 
now being served adequately. The majority of 
such inquiries come from the Pacific Coast and 
the Northwest area, Adler said. 

The need for a receiver-to-transmitter relay 
link to be owned and operated by a low power 
tv station for satellite operation where these 
stations cannot be located to pick up an orig- 
inating stations signal was emphasized by Adler. 
This might be achieved through use of uhf tv 
equipment operating in unused uhf tv channels 
or standard microwave relay equipment operat- 
ing in the microwave relay channels reserved 
for tv studio transmitter link service, Adler said. 
The high cost of common carrier to do this will 
act as a deterrent to the development and 
growth of low power tv, Adler reported. 

In his comments to the FCC, Gus Zaharias, 
president of WTIP Charleston, W. Va., be- 
lieved it would be in the public interest to al- 
low such use of the vhf band on a case-by-case 
basis. Mr. Zaharias noted that if there is to 
be a competitive tv service the FCC must re- 
vise the rules under the Sixth Report and 
Order. Mr. Zaharias noted that drastic meas- 
ures are needed to reduce the present "monop- 
olistic" complexion of tv and recommended the 
allocation of additional tv facilities. He deemed 
it unwise to restrict low power tv use to areas 
in a particular population bracket, as this 
would be assuming that areas above that 
bracket are receiving adequate tv service. Mr. 
Zaharias said that under the present structure 
there are not only small towns without tv 



facilities, but that in larger cities where all the 
service is provided by one or two stations, 
there is so much preoccupation with network 
programming that local tv becomes of minor 
significance and facilities for local expression 
are limited or non-existent. 

Meanwhile, Seward Community Tv Inc., 
holder of franchise agreements with principals 
in Seward and Kenai, both Alaska, filed com- 
ments opposing the FCC proposal. Neither 
Seward, with a population under 6,000, and 
Kenai, under 3,000, can support an allocated tv 
station, the comment noted. Seward Com- 
munity said that the programming require- 
ments of Seward and Kenai are different, and 
where local interest indicates a willingness and 
ability to serve these needs they should be 
given priority over any possible extension-by- 
satellite, owned or controlled by a high-pow- 
ered parent station. 

FCC Seeks Comment on AT&T 
Off-the-Air Service for Tvs 

THE FCC last week asked for comments on 
the AT&T's plans to provide off-the-air serv- 
ice for tv stations in remote areas of the coun- 
try [B»T, Feb. 28]. The Commission set April 
29 as the deadline for comments. 

The AT&T proposal — which came after 
many complaints that the telephone company's 
intercity connection charges were excessive — 
offers to bring a network outlet's signals to a 
small station via off-the-air relay. Each "con- 
nection" will be individually priced, AT&T 
said, with prospective savings of about half 
of that for direct interconnection at distances 
from 100 to 125 miles. The greatest savings 
over charges for direct interconnection, AT&T 
said, would be for the longer distances. 

Each individual station would have to make 
its own arrangements with a network and the 
nearest network affiliate, the telephone com- 
pany said. It also warned that it did not think 
the quality of the off-air system would be as 
good as that of the direct connection service. 

The AT&T off-the-air pickup plan came fol- 
lowing an FCC proposal that tv operators in 
small, remote areas should have the right to 
build and operate their own tv relay systems. 
The Commission's proposal received virtually 
overwhelming support from broadcasters com- 
menting [B»T, Nov. 15, 1954]. The FCC has 
not yet made a final decision on that proposal. 



Satisfied 

ONLY 1 1 % of AT&T's intercity tv con- 
nections are being shared, the FCC's 
Common Carrier Bureau told the Com- 
mission last week in a petition to dismiss 
the five-year-old investigation of the 
Bell System's allocation of tv facilities 
among the networks. 

Apparently all service requirements are 
being met satisfactorily, the Common 
Carrier Bureau said. Thus, the proceed- 
ings should be closed. 

The investigation began in late 1950 
following complaints by DuMont Tele- 
vision Network and ABC that they were 
being "frozen" out of intercity tv circuits 
because of the heavier demands for 
NBC and CBS programs. Before the 
hearings began, all networks and AT&T 
evolved a plan for allocating circuits 
which were approved by all concerned. 
This worked on a formula involving sta- 
tion requests and a revolving position 
each month for first choices. 



FCC DEFENDS ITS 
FT. WAYNE RULING 

STOUT defense of its decision in the Fort 
Wayne ch. 69 case was made by the FCC last 
week. 

In a brief filed with the U. S. Court of Ap- 
peals in Washington, the Commission insisted 
that it was justified in denying James R. Flem- 
ing and the late Paul V. McNutt (Anthony 
Wayne Broadcasting) and granting the uhf 
channel to WANE Fort Wayne. 

The FCC, overruling the examiner, decided 
that WANE was better qualified on the issues 
of local diversification of the media of com- 
munications. It also held that Mr. Fleming 
and Mr. McNutt are controlling trustees of the 
Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, which in conjunc- 
tion with the Fort Wayne News Sentinel 
(WGL), requires "forced" combination adver- 
tising rates for classified and national advertis- 
ers. This makes the qualifications of the An- 
thony Wayne owners questionable, the Com- 
mission held. 

Anthony Wayne, in its brief argued that the 
Commission held erroneously since Mr. Flem- 
ing and Mr. McNutt could not breach the con- 
tract between the two papers in establishing 
joint mechanical and business operations. It 
also held the practice of combination newspa- 
per rates is not illegal [B»T, Feb. 7]. 

The Commission said: 

"That the Commission may take into con- 
sideration the responsibility of an applicant 
for competitive practices which, while perhaps 
not in violation of law, are nevertheless incon- 
sistent with long established public policy of 
the United States in favor of competition, is 
beyond question." 

Antitrust Study Asks 
Curb on Regulation 

IMPLIED call for regulatory agencies to lessen 
their hold on the industries they oversee — in 
order to promote competition — was made by a 
special antitrust study committee to the Attor- 
ney General last week. 

In a chapter on regulated industries, the 60- 
man committee of attorneys and economists 
endorsed competition "as the major rule in our 
private enterprise economy." 

With an obvious eye on price fixing, rate 
regulation, etc., the committee added: 

"The committee notes an apparent trend to- 
ward . . . government control. We call at- 
tention to the fact that such regulation tends 
to beget further regulation. For if one industry 
is regulated then it may be urged that its com- 
petitors should, in fairness, also be regulated 

Although broadcasting was not mentioned by 
name — the committee was more concerned with 
railroads, motor carriers, airlines and other 
such regulated industries — it is a regulated 
industry operating under the eye of the FCC. 

In general, the committee made the follow- 
ing recommendations among others: 

• Repeal of the fair trade laws. This would 
free many products — including radio and tv re- 
ceivers — from producer-fixed prices. 

• Raise from the present $5,000 to $10,000 
the maximum penalty for antitrust violations. 

• Give judges discretion to award less than 
treble damages in private antitrust suits. 

Proof that members of a trade association 
participated in a conspiracy violating antitrust 
laws should be required, the committee de- 
clared. "Blanket findings" based on mere guilt 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 69 



by membership should be avoided, the com- 
mittee said. 

The committee was appointed by Attorney 
General Herbert Brownell Jr. last fall. 

Few, if any, antitrust actions have been in- 
stituted against broadcasters. However, some 
manufacturers affiliated with broadcast net- 
works and stations have been involved in such 
litigation. They are RCA, General Electric and 
Westinghouse, among others. At the present 
time, RCA has been charged with violation of 
the antitrust laws by the Dept. of Justice and 
in a private suit by Zenith Radio Corp. (see 
stories on pages 86-87). The broadcaster- 
owned Broadcast Music Inc. also is the de- 
fendant in a $150 million antitrust suit filed by 
the Songwriters of America late in 1953. 

Senate Hears FCC 
Request For $85,000 

Commission executive officer 
Robert Cox points up agency's 
need for salary finances and 
indicates curtailed spending 
on other normal activities. 

THE SENATE Appropriations Committee last 
week heard testimony on a House-passed sup- 
plemental appropriations bill (HR 4903) to 
give $85,000 to the FCC to continue its work 
on tv applications and other backlogs and to 
maintain its staff at the present average of 
1,030 persons through June 30, end of the 
1955 fiscal year. 

Robert Cox, FCC executive officer, told the 
Senate group that the FCCs budget for fiscal 
1955 was $700,000 less than that for fiscal 
1954. 

The FCC requested a reduced budget for this 
year, he said, in anticipation of "a situation 
which didn't materialize." He referred to the 
FCCs "attrition policy," which didn't work out. 

Mr. Cox explained that the FCC attrition 
plan was to replace departing employes only 
when necessary. But the tightened job situa- 
tion caused fewer employes than normally to 
quit and the FCC had to do some recruiting to 
fill important vacancies left in its Field Moni- 
toring Bureau, he said. 

Mr. Cox said the FCC could balance its 
books only by "a couple of payless days," un- 
less the $85,000 is approved. He said the FCC 
has frozen its spending on items other than 
salaries; that the FCC chairman is being "hard- 
boiled" about traveling expenses, and that the 
Commission is not carrying through its plan to 
purchase six more automobiles authorized for 
field monitoring. 

Answering a question from Sen. Spessard 
Holland (D-Fla.), Mr. Cox blamed delays and 
time lapses in some FCC cases on the Admin- 
istrative Procedures Act. 

He said the FCC still has three of six tem- 
porary hearing examiners hired to help reduce 
the applications backlog. The regular num- 
ber of examiners is around 11. All of the six 
temporary examiners were kept into the 1955 
calendar year, he said. 

Although the FCC received $300,000 extra 
for fiscal 1954, there were "strings" tied to it 
which made it "difficult to operate," Mr. Cox 
said, referring to the delays under the Admin- 
istrative Procedure Act. He said the FCC turned 
back a total of $440,000 for that year because 
"we didn't want to spend the money just for 
the sake of spending it." 

Mr. Cox made the statements about the 
money turnback in reply to questions from Sen. 
Allen Ellender (D-La.) "It just doesn't add 
up," Sen Ellender had said. 



HOUSE APPROVES FUNDS FOR FCC STUDY 
OF ECONOMICS IN NETWORK RADIO-TV 

Appropriations bill earmarks $80,000 for the project. Bill now moves 

to Senate Appropriations Subcommittee, chairmanned by Sen. Mag- 

nuson, who is investigating networks, plus uhf-vhf problems. 

network study compares with $100,000 sug- 
gested by FCC members during the February 
hearing [B»T, March 28]. FCC spokesmen said 
the probe would take a minimum of six months. 



THE FCCs ambition of several years' standing 
— to study the economics of radio and tv net- 
works — was a possibility instead of a dream 
last week as the House passed an appropria- 
tions bill earmarking $80,000 for that purpose 
in the agency's fiscal 1956 budget. 

The House's approval of the Independent 
Offices Appropriations Bill (HR 5240) came 
Wednesday after a House Independent Offices 
Appropriations Subcommittee had submitted the 
bill boosting by $170,000 the $6.7 million FCC 
budget recommended by the President. 

FCC made its plea for more money last 
Feb. 17 at a closed hearing before the House 
Appropriations subcommittee, headed by Rep. 
Albert Thomas (D-Tex.). Balance of the 
$170,000 increase — $90,000 — is to continue 
efforts "in eliminating the backlogs of work 
in television and radio and special services 
activities," particularly in tv. 

The new $6,870,000 FCC budget, as passed 
by the House and which now goes to the 
Senate, represents a boost of $240,600 over the 
agency's budget for fiscal 1955. 

The increased FCC budget was submitted 
over the previous weekend to the full House 
Appropriations Committee, headed by Rep. 
Clarence Cannon (D-Mo.), and was reported 
on the House floor Monday. 

Meanwhile, the Senate Appropriations Com- 
mittee, to which the 1956 appropriations bill 
will be referred when it reaches the Senate, 
last week heard testimony from an FCC spokes- 
man on a fiscal 1955 supplemental funds 
measure (HR 4903) which would give the 
FCC $85,000 to continue work on the backlog 
and maintain its present strength of some 1,030 
employes until July 1 (see story this page). 

Would Add 27 

A table submitted by Rep. Thomas during 
debate Wednesday on the 1956 appropriations 
bill showed a projected increase of FCC per- 
sonnel, under the proposed $170,000 budget 
boost, to 1,057 employes — or 27 more than 
present strength, including additional staff 
people for the FCC network study. 

These figures do not take into account some 
50 to 60 additional FCC employes who work 
on reimbursable projects and who thus are paid 
from separate funds. These additional funds 
would run from a fourth to a third of a million 
dollars, according to Robert Cox, FCC execu- 
tive officer. 

It has been felt the FCC may be in for some 
searching questions when the bill reaches the 
Senate Appropriations Committee. The bill will 
go for hearing to that group's Independent 
Offices Appropriations Subcommittee, which 
is headed by Sen. Warren G. Magnuson 
(D-Wash.). As chairman of the Senate Com- 
merce Committee, Sen. Magnuson is conducting 
an investigation of the networks and the uhf-vhf 
situation, and may want to know whether the 
FCC study will in any way duplicate the Com- 
merce Committee's probe. 

A spokesman for Sen. Magnuson, however, 
said last week the Washington Democrat is 
likely to be friendly to FCC funds increase. 
He said Sen. Magnuson feels the FCC has been 
too long on a "bread and water" diet imposed 
on the agency by the Executive Branch's Bureau 
of the Budget recommendations. 

The $80,000 approved by the House for the 



The Commission has requested funds for such a 
study every year since 1951. 

There were varying views last week at the 
FCC on who should conduct the study, how it 
should be conducted, how soon it would start 
and how long it would take. 

One spokesman felt there is much the FCC 
can look into which the Senate Commerce 
Committee cannot, but thought there should be 
liaison between the FCC and Senate probers to 
eliminate unnecessary duplication that would 
waste money. 

FCCs task would be a "study," not an "in- 
vestigation," he thought, since FCC is not going 
to prosecute anyone as it usually is thought of 
in connection with an investigation. He felt 
FCC should carry out the study both by ques- 
tionnaires and by going to a station's files to 
look over its records. Since everyone knows 
the problems (uhf troubles in getting network 
affiliations; option time, program syndication 
by networks, etc.), the end to be accomplished 
will be to get at the details and learn the whys 
and wherefores, he believed. 

He felt new people — qualified experts — 
should be hired to do the job. 

Another spokesman was against question- 
naires or public airing of station problems, be- 
cause, he said, station operators would be 
afraid to go on record with their true views. He 
felt FCC should send investigators to the sta- 
tions to look over files for factual situations. 

This official thought the FCC might contract 
a private law firm, one not now in the com- 
munications field, to conduct the study. 

FCC Comr. Robert E. Lee felt a network 
study by FCC would be in more expert hands 
than in Congress and thought FCC should 
assume the "leadership" in such an undertaking. 
He thinks the FCC, as its first step after receiv- 
ing funds, should select 8 or 10 expert staff 
people and assign them to the study, hiring 
extra outside help if necessary. 

Comr. Lee thinks the FCC study should 
begin with a detailed questionnaire to networks. 
He believes the study would take 90 days to get 
underway and about a year to complete. 

Although Comr. Lee does not feel a probe 
will turn up any serious evils, he believes the 
FCC should review the problems and air them. 

Comr. Frieda B. Hennock was flatly against 
a network study by the FCC, feeling that the 
Commission is too susceptible to industry in- 
fluence. It was understood she is much more 
favorable toward a probe by the Senate, with 
no holds barred, believing this is the only cer- 
tain way to get at the bottom of the problem 
and obtain legislative correction. Comr. Hen- 
nock didn't feel that FCCs chain broadcasting 
or any other Commission rules are adequate, 
and she already is on record in this respect. 

She said the FCC never has acted on the pro- 
test filed in 1947 against CBS by National Assn. 
of Radio Station Representatives (NARSR) 
that the network was entering the spot repre- 
sentation field [B«T, Oct. 6, 1947]. She recalled 
that a hearing was held, but that FCC never 
took any action. 



Page 70 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 




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Page 72 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



SALANT, PLOTKIN DEBATE TV VIEWS 



CBS vice president and former 
Senate commerce counsel de- 
bate problems of option time 
and de-intermixture at Federal 
Communications Bar Assn. 
luncheon in Washington. 

A WARNING that adoption of the Plotkin 
proposal that network option time be abolished 
[B*T, Feb. 7] might mean the death of tele- 
vision networking was sounded last week by 
Richard S. Salant, CBS vice president. 

Mr. Salant made his prediction in a debate 
with Harry M. Plotkin, author of the report 
bearing his name, before members of the Fed- 
eral Communications Bar Assn. at a luncheon 
meeting in Washington. 

Conversely, Mr. Plotkin warned that unless 
a solution is found to the uhf problem, net- 
works may become common carriers through 
legislation. 

Television networking is big business, Mr. 
Salant said. It has to be because it has to use 
"acres of studios, of storage space for props," 
a large working force and millions invested 
in equipment, Mr. Salant pointed out. Yet, he 
admonished, a "nice" profit can be turned into 
a huge loss in a hurry "by just a couple of can- 
cellations." 

The real "touchstone," Mr. Salant pointed 
out, is public opinion. 

"The public has placed a greater stamp of 
approval on the tv industry than on any other 
industry," he said. Tv and the networks live 
in a goldfish bowl and have got to operate 
in the public interest, he added. 

The problems are internal, Mr. Salant em- 
phasized. The solution must come from within 
the industry rather than from the outside 
through regulation or legislation. 

"We must be careful," he said, "that we 
don't throw the baby out with the bath water." 

Small Station Problem 

Basically, Mr. Salant said, the uhf prob- 
lem is the problem of small stations. 

Before any move is made against present 
network practices, Mr. Salant said, two ques- 
tions have to be answered: 

Do you want networks? And, have they 
done more harm than good? 

This, after all, Mr. Salant said, involves 
"only five hours and 28 minutes a day." 

Mr. Plotkin, former FCC assistant general 
counsel, held that the answer to the uhf eco- 
nomic plight lay in assuring a greater source 
of programs and making affiliates more inde- 
pendent of networks. 

He said that where there are three or more 
tv outlets in a single market, stations become 
"subservient" to the networks. 

Abolition of option time would permit sta- 
tions to assert their freedom from network 
domination, Mr. Plotkin said. 

Present network practices, Mr. Plotkin said, 
mean that when a station has a national spot 
account in option time, the network can pre- 
empt the time on 56 days notice. Even on 
non-option time, the station generally will ac- 
cede to a network's request for time, Mr. Plot- 
kin said. This does not give stations enough 
stability to build up non-network programming 
and advertising, he said. 

Mr. Plotkin also repeated his convictions 
that moving all tv to uhf was perhaps the most 
logical move, but not feasible. The 30 mil- 
lion sets now in existence would mean an "ex- 
tensive dislocation" which might ruin tv, he 
said. Among other things, he pointed out, 



moving all tv stations to uhf would mean that 
present fringe viewers would lose service al- 
together. 

Mr. Plotkin also frowned on de-intermixture. 
Where there is no vhf station on the air, he ex- 
plained, it might be possible. Otherwise, de- 
intermixture would also result in dislocations. 

Deletion of the excise tax on all-channel tv 
receivers would help, Mr. Plotkin said. It 
would bring price parity to vhf and uhf sets, 
he said. 

In answer to a question from the floor sug- 
gesting the equalization of vhf and uhf by re- 
ducing vhf power and antenna heights and 
mileage separations, Mr. Plotkin said that he 
did not believe shrinking service areas would 
benefit stations. It would mean the loss of ad- 
vertising support, he said, and result in poor 
programming. 




SALANT AND PLOTKIN 

SPOKESMAN for the accused says the ac- 
cuser's plan would kill tv networking. 



L'HEUREUX SEEN 
AS GOP COUNSEL 

Attorney, now counsel on Sen- 
ate Commerce Committee's 
staff, is considered Bricker's 
choice to head minority side of 
network, uhf-vhf probe. 
SPECULATION on the appointment of Rob- 
ert L'Heureux, counsel on the Senate Com- 
merce Committee's professional staff, as Re- 
publican counsel for 
■■■■■■ the committee's in- 
vestigation of net- 
I work and uhf-vhf 
W | troubles gained in- 

|| 3 creasing currency 

last week. 

Although no offi- 
cial announcement 
had been made by 
late Thursday, it 
was understood Mr. 
L'Heureux had been 
chosen to represent 
GOP committee 
members by Sen. 
John W. Bricker (R-Ohio), the group's ranking 
Republican and its chairman in the 83d Con- 
gress. 

Mr. L'Heureux has been with the commit- 
tee since the opening of the 83d Congress in 
1953, when he joined as chief committee coun- 
sel under the chairmanship of the late Sen. 
Charles Tobey (R-N.H). Mr. L'Heureux, also 
from New Hampshire, moved to the Commerce 
Committee from the Senate Banking & Cur- 
rency Committee, where he also had served as 
chief counsel. 

He became counsel for the committee's Busi- 
ness & Consumer Interests Subcommittee 
upon the death of Sen. Tobey in 1953 [B«T, 
July 27, 1953]. In the 84th Congress he has 
performed various committee jobs in behalf of 
Sen. Bricker and other GOP committee mem- 
bers. 

Mr. L'Heureux also has served as counsel 
to the Joint Congressional Committee on De- 
fense Production. He is a graduate of St. 
Anselm's College, Manchester, N. H. (1934), 
and the Georgetown U. (D.C.) Law School 
(1938). He holds master's degrees from George- 
town U. and George Washington U. (D.C.) and 
a Litt. B. from the U. of Montreal. 

Meanwhile, Sidney Davis, who had been 
named the week before as Democratic counsel 



MR. L'HEUREUX 



for the committee's network probe by Chair- 
man Warren G. Magnuson (D-Wash.), officially 
assumed his new duties last week. He indicated 
no announcement would come until after the 
Senate's jJaster recess (April 5-12, inclusive) 
concerning the date the committee's upcoming 
hearings will begin. 

Coordinating the network probe will be 
Nicholas Zapple, the committee's professional 
communications counsel. 

Upon his appointment, Mr. L'Heureux would 
succeed Robert F. Jones, former FCC com- 
missioner and former Ohio congressman, who 
served as GOP counsel for the probe from its 
preliminary phase last summer until last Feb- 
ruary, when he submitted a progress report on 
his findings [B«T, Feb. 21]. Mr. Davis suc- 
ceeds Harry M. Plotkin, former FCC assistant 
general counsel, who likewise left the post of 
Democratic counsel for the inquiry upon sub- 
mitting a memorandum of suggestions [B«T, 
Feb. 7]. 

The FCC and the Justice Dept. are scheduled 
to testify at the coming hearings on the recom- 
mendations of Messrs. Jones and Plotkin. The 
two agencies also have been asked to make 
interim reports, with final reports in six months. 

Senate Passes Over Rule 
To Give Witness Tv Choice 

A RESOLUTION entitling a witness in a Sen- 
ate committee hearing to object to being tele- 
vised was passed over by the Senate last week 
on a call of the calendar. 

The resolution (S Res 17) would permit a 
witness to object to being televised on grounds 
of distraction, harassment or physical discom- 
fort, with committee members present ruling 
on his request. 

The measure was passed over upon the re- 
quest of Sen. Alan Bible (D-Nev.) Monday on 
a call of the calendar. It would amend Rule 
XXV of the Senate's standing rules. 

S Res 17 was based on recommendations 
made by a Senate Rules Subcommittee in Jan- 
uary [B«T, Jan. 10] after hearings during the 
83d Congress on overhauling Senate committee 
procedures. The subcommittee, under chair- 
manship of Sen. William E. Jenner (R-Ind.) 
during the 83d, also recommended a study of 
the practicability of installing modern facilities 
on Capitol Hill for radio-tv and other coverage 
of committee hearings. 

During last year's hearings [B«T, July 5, 
1954, et seq.], radio-tv broadcasters rallied 
strongly to the defense of their media's rights 
[B*T, Aug. 9, 1954]. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 73 



— — — — — — — GOVERNMENT 

COMR. LEE URGES SELF-POLICING 



He tells Tennessee broadcast- 
ers the FCC receives com- 
plaints of excessive and/or 
lengthy commercials, bait-and- 
switch advertising and bad 
taste programming. 

CALL for radio and tv operators to be militant 
in self-policing, rather than allow the task to 
fall to the FCC or some other government 
agency, was voiced last Monday by FCC Comr. 
Robert E. Lee in a talk before the Tennessee 
Assn. of Broadcasters at Nashville. 

Complaints received by FCC now fall into 
three categories, he said, listing them as ( 1 ) 
excessive commercials, both as to number and 
duration, (2) bait-and-switch advertising and 
(3) bad taste programming. Although noting 
"that a clamor from a militant minority can 
frequently create an impression of a serious 
problem that may or may not exist," Comr. 
Lee urged "serious self appraisal of where we 
stand today in the delicate matter of program- 
ming the public interest." 

As to excessive commercials, Comr. Lee per- 
sonally said he would not object *to "99.4% 
commercially sponsored time, but I do object to 
an unreasonable amount of the broadcast hour 
being devoted to the sales pitch." He warned 
that the practice is harmful because it drives 
listeners away until all are gone, followed by 
the advertiser. 

"You have no solution when you cram more 
and more commercials down the throats of 
fewer and fewer listeners," he said. "It would 
be infinitely better to redouble efforts to im- 
prove programming, thus capturing more au- 
dience and hence more advertising." 

Although bait-and-switch advertising is of 
primary concern to the Federal Trade Commis- 
sion, Comr. Lee noted, FCC "cannot ignore 
this type of advertising and, as one member of 
the Commission, I condemn it." 

'Bad Taste' Responsibility 

Comr. Lee said bad taste programming "does 
not give me personally the problem it does 
others. As a father of three, there are some pro- 
grams I would prefer my children not to watch. 
I admit that there are bad programs on the air 
— there are bad books, too. By and large, how- 
ever, I do not believe broadcasters are con- 
tributing to juvenile delinquency through pro- 
gramming. 

"In order to have heroes you must have vil- 
lains. The Indian has scalped the cowboy since 
time immemorial without prostituting the na- 
tion. Robin Hood was something of a com- 
munist in endeavoring to spread the wealth by 
stealing from the rich to give to the poor. Jack 
and the beanstalk was a real delinquent who 
disobeyed his mother, ran away, killed his 
neighbor, stole his property and returned in 
triumph to share his ill-gotten gains with his 
mother for a happy remaining life." 

Mentioning the colorcast of Macbeth as "one 
of the finest tv productions I have seen to date," 
Comr. Lee said he was not aware of any com- 
plaints "on the horrible sights enacted. Most of 
the Commandments were broken in this play 
with vivid action." 

Comr. Lee hesitated in defining FCC's re- 
sponsibility in such problems because "the 
line between public interest and censorship is 
dangerously close." 

"If we deny a station the right to broadcast 
horse-race odds as an aid to gambling, are 
we not in effect censoring?" Comr. Lee asked. 
"I do not know where public interest leaves 
off and censorship begins, but if I ever have to 



make the decision I would probably take a cal- 
culated risk and refuse to censor, since I am 
well aware of the dangers to the American way 
of life that such a step could lead." 

In respect to license renewal policy and 
"overall program review," Comr. Lee said, 
"continued abuse by broadcasters of their pub- 
lic service responsibility may bring us closer to 
a semblance of censorship that we all want to 
shun. Don't force the FCC to enter this danger- 
ous area." 

WKAT FAVORED 
FOR MIAMI CH. 10 

THIRD commercial vhf tv station for Miami 
came in prospect last week as FCC Examiner 
Herbert Sharfman issued his initial decision pro- 
posing to grant ch. 10 there to A. Frank Katzen- 
tine's WKAT-AM-FM Miami Beach. The ex- 
aminer would deny competitive bids by L. B. 
Wilson Inc. (WCKY Cincinnati), North Dade 
Video Inc. and Public Service Television Inc. 
(National Airlines). 

Already operating at Miami are ch. 4 WTVJ 
(TV) and George B. Storer's ch. 23 WGBS- 
TV. Initial decision to grant ch. 7 to Biscayne 
Television Inc. (merger of WIOD and WQAM) 
is awaiting final ruling by FCC. Permits for 
ch. 33 WMFL (TV) and educational ch. 2 
WTHS-TV are outstanding. 

In a detailed comparative analysis of the four 
applicants, Examiner Sharfman concluded that 
WKAT has a "clear lead in the composite con- 
sideration of local ownership, civic participation 
and integration of ownership and management. 
When this is coupled with the assurances of 
operation in the public interest inferable from 
its long past broadcast record as a whole, it is 
apparent that the greater likelihood it offers of 
fulfilling its promises are a formidable chal- 
lenge to any competitor who would try to over- 
take it." 

The examiner noted that "the other appli- 
cants are not without virtures of their own, as 
WKAT itself recognizes. Wilson is a broadcast 
licensee of long standing, and while its Cin- 
cinnati programming is subject to criticism 
[commercial percentage at night], it was felt 
that traits of character exhibited by its operators 
justified a conclusion that reliance could be 
placed upon its proposals here. It made an 
admirable preparatory effort. 

"Unfortunately for it, however, its one real 
link with the Miami area was broken when Mr. 
[L. B.] Wilson died, and the assurance it offers 
cannot be held to measure up to those of 
WKAT, enjoying the advantages alluded to." 

North Dade, headed by steel fabricator 
Frank Brysen, and including as vice president- 
manager, Walter Compton, tv consultant and 
former manager of WTTG (TV) Washington, 
also could not match WKAT's merits, the 
examiner concluded. 

"North Dade is a group of nine local ama- 
teurs and one professional. That it hopes to 
break into the glamorous field of television is 
not in itself to be held against it, as the way is 
open to any qualified applicant, veteran or new- 
comer," Mr. Sharfman wrote. "It merits recog- 
nition, apart from local residence and attendant 
factors, because of the television experience of 
its 10% stockholder and proposed general man- 
ager, a fact which also entitles it to a slight pref- 
erence point on staffing. But it, like Wilson, 
falls short of equaling the appeal of WKAT." 

The examiner pointed out that although Pub- 
lic Service "is a newcomer to the field," it is 
wholly owned by National Airlines, "a corpo- 



ration with deep local roots, with principals 
intimately identified with Florida and the Miami 
area. Its parents's primary business, however, is 
not radio or television, but air transportation. | 
Its management team is accustomed to regula- 
tion, though there were signs on the record of I 
this proceeding that it is occasionally restive ! 
and demands a free rein." 

Considering the resemblances between the 
two fields as "superficial," the examiner felt that 
"with the best will in the world, success in one 
field does not automatically promise equal suc- 
cess in the other. Accordingly, though full 
weight is accorded National Airlines' record as 
an air carrier . . . it's total qualifications as a f 
television applicant do not equal those of 
WKAT, already revealed in its long broadcast- j 
ing record in the community, an operation sub- 
ject to the jurisdiction of this commission." 

The examiner explained "the preference 
which has been accorded WKAT in the pre- 
ceding discussion survives despite the fact that 
in one or two program categories its proposals 
did not come up to its opponents." The ex- 
aminer also refused to disqualify WKAT be- 
cause of onetime horse-race programs aired by 
the station. 

FCC Defends Decision 
In Allentown-Easton Case 

DEFENSE of the Court of Appeals' decision 
in the nine-year-old Allentown-Easton, Pa., 
1230 kc case was submitted to the Supreme 
Court last week by WHOL Allentown. 

The court is expected to hear argument on 
the case the week of April 18. 

WHOL held that the FCC was wrong in de- j 
ciding the Allentown-Easton radio hearing on t 
the ground that Easton needed a new station 
more than Allentown did. WHOL claimed that 
the Communication Act requires a full hearing 
on all comparative issues. 

It also charged that the FCC's grant to 
Easton Publishing Co. — overturned last summer 
by the U. S. Court of Appeals in Washington — 
permitted an overconcentration of control of 
the media of communications and was based 
on "tainted" testimony. It also declared that 
Easton Publishing Co.'s program proposals 
were "shrouded in uncertainty." 

Easton Publishing Co. owns the Easton Ex- 
press and is the licensee of ch. 57 WGLV (TV) i 
Easton. 

The FCC erred further, WHOL said, in over- 
ruling the examiner's findings based on the de- i 
meanor of witnesses. 

Following a hearing with three other appli- j 
cants, what is now CBS-affiliated WHOL, began 
operating on 1280 kc in Allentown. This deci- 
sion was appealed by Easton and sustained by [ 
the courts. A second hearing was held in 1951, j 
which resulted in the examiner proposing to 
affirm the grant to WHOL. The Commission, 
however, reversed the examiner and issued a ! 
final grant to the Easton applicant. WHOL 
then appealed and again the appellate court 
remanded the case to the Commission. It is this 
decision which the FCC appealed to the Su- ! 
preme Court. 

Earlier this month, the Commission told the 1 
Supreme Court that the lower court was apply- . 
ing its own judgment on policy for the Com- 
mission's [B«T, March 7]. It also claimed that 
the court misunderstood a high tribunal deci- 
sion regarding the right to overrule an exam- 
iner's judgment regarding witness' demeanor. 

Earlier last month, the Supreme Court re- I 
fused to permit the Easton Publishing Co. to f 
intervene in this case. 



Page 74 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 




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Compact and quiet running, the 20V is ideal for combination operations. 

For unattended, remotely controlled installations, it is essentially 
foolproof due to modern, simplified circuit designs. 

Maximum reliability is assured with the 20V because of conservatively 
rated components, high capacity cooling and special circuit 
refinements, including arc-suppression, filament 
and plate recycling overload breakers. 

You will be pleased to know that it costs no more to own the best. 
Your nearest Collins office will give you the full story on the 20V. 



COLLINS RADIO COMPANY 



COLLINS 
1000/SO0 WATT TRANSMITTER 



CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA 



261 Madison Avenue, NEW YORK 16 
1930 Hi-Line Drive, PALLAS 2 
2700 W. Olive Avenue, BURBANK 
Dogwood Road, Fountain City. KNOXVILLE 
222 W. Pensacola Street, TALLAHASSEE 



COLLINS RADIO COMPANY OF CANADA, LTD. 
74 Sparks St., OTTAWA, ONTARIO 




LL 



GOVERNMENT 



Three Am CPs, Two Switches 
Among Authorizations by FCC 

NEW standard stations at Clifton, Ariz., Camp- 
bell, Ohio, and Madison, Ga., were authorized 
by the FCC last week. 

A 250 w fulltime outlet on 1450 kc at Clif- 
ton was granted to Henry Chester Darwin, do- 
ing business as Darwin Bcstg. Co. Mr. Darwin 
is owner of KPAS Banning, Calif. 

A 250 w daytimer on 1570 kc at Campbell 
went to Myron Jones, president-majority stock- 
holder and general manager of WJET Erie, 
Pa. Grant is subject to such interference as 
may be caused by the proposed operation of 
WAKU Latrobe, Pa., which is to increase its 
power to 1 kw on 1570 kc. 

At Madison, a new 1 kw daytime on 1250 
kc went to David Leonard Hitchcock, owner 
of a local electrical appliance company. 

Also, the FCC granted authority to WKOZ 
Kosciusko, Miss., to change from unlimited 
250 w operation on 1340 kc to daytime opera- 
tion with 5 kw on 1350 kc. KWEW Hobbs, 
N. M., was granted change in its facilities from 
250 w unlimited operation on 1490 kc to 1480 
kc with 1 kw fulltime, utilizing a nighttime 
directional array. 

Meanwhile, by memorandum opinion and 
order, the FCC granted petitions of WWNH 
Rochester, N. H., and WVDA Boston, Mass., 
for reconsideration of the Commission's action 
of last January granting without hearing the 
bid of Granite State Broadcasting Co. for a new 
5 kw fulltime am station at Dover, N. H., on 
1270 kc, directional antenna. FCC postponed 
the effective date of the Granite State grant 
pending final determination of hearing to be 
held April 27. 

By separate order, the FCC dismissed the 
protest of WHK Cleveland, Ohio, for recon- 
sideration of the Commission's grant without 
hearing of the application of WCED Dubois, 
Pa., to change its daytime directional pattern. 

Industry Testimony Invited 
On Campaign Funds Hearing 

REPRESENTATIVES of the networks and 
NARTB have been invited to testify at hear- 
ings in Washington April 12-13 by a Senate 
Elections Subcommittee on a bill to boost 
campaign expenditures for elections of Presi- 
dents and congressmen. 

The bill (S 636), introduced by Sen. Thomas 
C. Hennings (D-Mo.), subcommittee chairman, 
would boost national committee spending dur- 
ing presidential elections from $3 million to 
$12.3 million and would set similar upward 
ceilings for candidates for senator and repre- 
sentative [B*T, March 28]. 

WSPA-TV Move Protests 
To Be Heard April 25 

HEARING on protests against the move of 
the ch. 7 transmitter of WSPA-TV Spartanburg, 
S. C, to Paris Mt., 5 X A miles outside Green- 
ville, S. C, will be held April 25, the FCC an- 
nounced last week. 

The Commission acted following an appeals 
court ruling that protestants ch. 23 WGVL 
(TV) Greenville and ch. 40 WAIM-TV An- 
derson, S. C, must be given a hearing on their 
objections to the WSPA-TV move [B*T, 
March 28]. 

The uhf stations charged that the WSPA-TV 
move was dictated by its desire to secure a CBS 
affiliation. At its original site, Hogback Mt., the 
Greenville and Anderson stations said, WSPA- 
TV would overlap coverage with CBS-affiliated 
WBTV (TV) Charlotte, N. C. This would pre- 



vent WSPA-TV from securing a CBS affilia- 
tion, they said, and it was for this purpose that 
the Paris Mt. site was chosen. 

WSPA-TV received its grant in 1953 with 
its transmitter on Hogback Mt. Early in 1954, 
it asked the FCC for permission to begin tem- 
porary operation on Paris Mt. This was op- 
posed by the Greenville and Anderson stations 
and after a court-directed stay order, WSPA- 
TV dropped its temporary authority and asked 
for a permanent move to Paris Mt. After the 
FCC granted this, further court appeals were 
taken by the two uhf stations. Two weeks ago, 
the court ruled that the FCC must allow the 
protestants to plead their cases in an administra- 
tive hearing. 

Hearings Set This Week 
On Tv-Delinquency Tie-up 

THE SENATE Juvenile Delinquency Subcom- 
mittee has set hearings for Wednesday and 
Thursday this week on television programming 
as possible factors in juvenile delinquency. 

The hearings will be held from 10 a.m. to 
noon both days, tentatively in the old Supreme 
Court Room of the Capitol Bldg., according to 
James H. Bobo, chief counsel. 

Chairman Estes Kefauver (D-Tenn.) has in- 
vited all the tv networks and NARTB to send 
representatives for testimony. He said the hear- 
ings will be open to radio-tv coverage. 

Witnesses scheduled by last week for the 
hearings, which may run over into a third day, 
were: Wednesday — Prof. Dallas Smythe, Illi- 
nois U. Institute of Communications Research; 
Dr. Eleanor E. Maccoby, Harvard U. social 
relations department; Dr. Ralph Banay, Co- 
lumbia U. research psychiatrist; Harold Fel- 
lows, president, and Edward Bronsbn, Tv Code 
affairs director, both NARTB. Thursday — FCC 
Comr. Frieda B. Hennock; Dr. Paul Lazars- 
feld, Columbia U. sociology department; Wil- 
liam A. Wood, station manager, educational 
WQED (TV) Pittsburgh. 

Messrs. Fellows and Bronson will make a 
progress report on what NARTB has done in 
stepping up its monitoring program and in in- 
creasing its Tv Code staff. 

Merchandising Tie-ins 
Under Scrutiny of FTC 

THE Federal Trade Commission has under in- 
vestigation merchandising tie-ins, on local ra- 
dio and tv stations, that tend to discriminate 
against other advertisers in the same market. 

This was revealed by FTC Chairman Edward 
F. Howrey before a House appropriations sub- 
committee last February. The extent of the 
probe was not made public, but Chairman 
Howrey did cite two general situations — one 
involving food processors or manufacturers and 
the other manufacturers of drug products. 

In the first case, local radio or tv stations 
have afforded "free advertising" to local retail 
chains on condition that they make available 
space for display and promotional services on 
behalf of an advertising food processor or 
manufacturer. Through this tie-in between 
national advertising and local retail store dis- 
plays, the FTC claims, manufacturers may be 
providing advertising and promotional facilities 
which discriminate against competitors of the 
chain stores that receive the benefits of the 
arrangement. 

The second case involved a group of drug 
chains that brought pressure upon drug manu- 
facturers to purchase time on a national tv 
program, with the manufacturers bearing the 
major burden of the cost. The drug chains 
sponsored the show cooperatively on local 
stations. 



Tulsa Competitors Charge 
KTVX (TV) Misrepresentation 

CHARGES that KTVX (TV) Muskogee was 
misrepresenting itself as a Tulsa station were 
made by KOTV (TV) and KVOO-TV Tulsa 
in complaints filed with the FCC last week. 

The two Tulsa stations asked the Commis- 
sion to issue cease and desist orders to pre- 
vent ch. 8 KTVX from continuing the alleged 
practices. They also asked that the Muskogee 
station be set for hearing if it persisted in 
identifying itself as a Tulsa station. 

Gist of the complaints by the two Tulsa vhf 
stations are as follows: 

That in its advertising and promotion, KTVX 
is identifying itself as a Tulsa area station or as 
a Muskogee-Tulsa station. That KTVX is omit- 
ting mention of its location in Muskogee in 
station identifications and that it implies it is a 
Tulsa station by mentioning its ownership by 
Tulsa Broadcasting Co. (KTUL). That it is 
advertising heavily in Tulsa newspapers, but not 
at all in Muskogee newspapers. That a Tulsa 
address is given for the station in some of 
its trade advertising. That in some commer- 
cials, listeners are urged to write the station, 
at a Tulsa box number. That in its trade pro- 
motion it is exaggerating its coverage of eastern 
Oklahoma. 

Other charges alleged that KTVX plans to 
build its studios in Tulsa and that it boasts of 
its tie with Griffin Grocery Co., and uses this 
connection possibly in restraint of trade. 

Similar allegations were made last year by 
then operating ch. 23 KCEB (TV) Tulsa. The 
Commission held that the charges were made 
prematurely, since KTVX had not yet begun 
operating. 

Robert S. McCaw Wins Grant 
For Yakima, Wash., Ch. 23 

NEW tv station on ch. 23 at Yakima, Wash., 
was granted by the FCC last week. 

The station is owned by Robert S. McCaw, 
doing business as Chinook Tv Co. Mr. McCaw 
is president and one-third owner of K.YAK 
Yakima, KALE-AM-FM Richland, and KLAN 
Renton, all Washington, and also is 10% owner 
of Harbor Tv Corp., community tv system at 
Aberdeen. 

The new tv station will operate with an 
effective radiated power of 21.9 kw visual and 
1 1 .7 kw aural, with antenna 960 ft. above aver- 
age terrain. Estimated construction cost was 
listed as $114,156 with first year operating 
cost as $120,000. 

Ch. 29 KIMA-TV is presently the only 
operating station at Yakima. 

FCC Grants WTAP (TV) Sale 
To Zanesville Publishing Co. 

SALE of ch. 15 WTAP (TV) Parkersburg, 
W. Va., by Howard L. Chernoff and associates 
for $124,609 to Zanesville Publishing Co., re- 
ceived FCC approval last week. 

Zanesville Publishing, 63% owner of WHIZ- 
AM-TV in that Ohio city, and publisher of the 
Zanesville Signal and Times-Recorder, is owned 
by Clay Littick and family. WHIZ-TV operates 
on ch. 18. 

WTAP began operating in November 1953. 
A balance sheet submitted as of December 31, 
1954, listed total liabilities of $334,595 with a 
1954 loss of $128,088. (For details of other 
sales receiving FCC approval last week see 
For the Record, page 93.) 



Page 76 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 




Did you smear it on the cat? 



If that's how you tested your Advertising Council campaigns, she licked the 
right ideas. Just look below at the job done by four of the many hundreds of 
campaigns you've created since 1942. And by you, we mean all the agency 
account men, writers, artists, and media people who have given the 
Advertising Council their time, talent, and space for free. But the job's not finished, 
so don't give away your cat. You'll need her to test ideas for new Advertising Council 
campaigns to help solve some of America's most pressing problems. 





com*** 




Helped drop death rate 
for all accidents to 
lowest figure on record. 



Created Smokey, the Helped raise the number of local citi- Recruited 350,000 volun-. 
Fire Preventin' Bear, who zens' committees working for Better teer skywatchers for the 
helped reduce forest fires. Schools from 17 to 9000 in 4 years. Ground Observer Corps. 

The Advertising Council, Inc., 25 West 45th Street, New York 36, N. Y. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 77 




WREXVTV 

delivers 




■■■■^ all or part of 12 counties and over 
100 communities — 23 towns over 5,000 
population— 77 towns over J,000 population. 



■■■■►Over 250.000 TV sets in this Bilh'on 
Do/iar 7-cily sales area. /I has a population 
of weli over 1.000.000. 

WR EX-TV HoeWord fflinois, the 7-cify 
station dominates this tremendous market 
with 58 top CBS-ABC network shows. 




CBS-ABC 

AFFILIATIONS 



mm 



CHANNEL 



HOCKFORD* ILLINOIS 




STATIONS 



TV OUTLETS START 
IN TAMPA, WACO 

SECOND tv outlets for Tampa, Fla., and 
Waco, Tex., were scheduled to begin commer- 
cial programming last Friday (April 1). 

In Tampa, WTVT (TV), on ch. 13, will be 
affiliated with CBS and represented by Avery- 
Knodel Inc. Opening program was to include 
a half-hour film of Ybor City, local Latin sec- 
tion. W. Walter Tison is vice president and 
general manager. 

In Waco, KWTX-TV, the first vhf there, is 
represented by John E. Pearson Tv Inc. The 
ch. 10 station is owned by KWTX Broadcasting 
Co. Equipment is RCA. 

Two other new tv stations have reported 
construction progress: 

WBRZ (TV) Baton Rouge, La., began test 
patterns last Wednesday and expected to begin 
commercial programming on April 14 affili- 
ated with NBC and ABC. Doug Manship is 
president of the ch. 2 station. National repre- 
sentative is George P. Hollingbery Co. 

KGMB-TV Honolulu (ch. 9) has announced 
that its satellite KHBC-TV Hilo (ch. 9) has be- 
gun test patterns and that its other satellite, 
KMAU (TV) Wailuku (ch. 3), will complete 
installation of equipment in about three weeks. 
The programs of KGMB-TV will be rebroad- 
cast in their entirety. There will be no rate 
increase, C. Richard Evans, vice president and 
general manager, said. 

Pearson Appoints Baird 
To Head Atlanta Office 

PLANS for the expansion of John E. Pearson 
Co., New York, station representative firm, 
were announced last Thursday by John E. Pear- 
son, president. The company will open a new 
office in Atlanta, servicing advertisers and 
agencies in the Southeast and going as far west 
as New Orleans and Memphis. 

Robert M. Baird, a vice president who has 




MR. BAIRD 



MR. MURPHY 



been in charge of the company's Dallas office 
for three years, has been appointed head of the 
Atlanta operation. 

Mr. Baird will be replaced in Dallas by 
Thomas R. Murphy, formerly a vice president 
of Grant Adv. in charge of the agency's Dallas 
office. 

Prior to his association with the agency, Mr. 
Murphy was with KRLD'Dallas, as an account 
executive. 

The Atlanta office is the seventh branch op- 
eration to be opened by Pearson. 

KSD, 'Post-Dispatch' Head 
Joseph Pulitzer Dies At 70 

JOSEPH PULITZER, 70, president of KSD- 
AM-TV St. Louis and editor-publisher of the 
St. Louis Post-Dispatch, died Wednesday night 
from a ruptured blood vessel in the abdomen. 

Last week Mr. Pulitzer had been going about 
his duties normally and had been at his office 




all day Wednesday after attending the annual 
gridiron dinner of the St. Louis Ad Club, Tues- 
day. He became ill about 9:30 p.m. Wednes- 
day and was taken to Barnes Hospital where 
he died. 

Shortly after 
broadcasting began 
in the early 20s, Mr. 
Pulitzer asked his 
advertising manager, 
George M. Burbach, 
what he thought 
about radio. Mr. 
x Burbach figured ra- 
dio programs and a 
radio page in the 
"A newspaper would at- 
jM Jjp ' tract advertising lin- 

MR. PULITZER f«f • Mr " 

left business details 

of the project to Mr. Burbach and the station 

took the air in 1922. About a year later KSD 

was granted its present 550 kc frequency. KSD- 

TV took the air Feb. 8, 1947, on ch. 5. 

Mr. Pulitzer is survived by his widow; two 
sons, Joseph Jr., associate editor of the Post- 
Dispatch and vice president of the Pulitzer 
Publishing Co., and Michael, of Boston; two 
daughters, a brother and a sister, and eight 
grandchildren. 

Mr. Pulitzer had been head of the Post- 
Dispatch over 40 years, taking over from his 
father, the elder Joseph Pulitzer, who died 
Oct. 29, 1911. 

Col. Robert McCormick Dies; 
WGN-AM-TV Among Holdings 

COL. ROBERT R. McCORMICK, 74, presi- 
dent of WGN-AM-TV Chicago, died early 
Friday at his farm 
home west of Chi- 
cago. Col. McCor- 
mick had been hos- 
pitalized several 
times in recent 
years, having suf- 
fered from erysipelas 
and pneumonia as 
well as undergoing 
an abdominal oper- 
ation. 

Col. McCormick 
had been active in 
his work until early COL McCORMICK 

in March despite a January operation to cor- 
rect adhesions and had spent part of the winter 
in Florida. He returned to Chicago March 
10, spending a period under observation in a 
hospital and then moving out to his farm. 

As president of the Tribune Co. he also con- 
trolled WPIX (TV) New York, a unit of News 
Syndicate Co. which is owned by Tribune Co. 

In 1910 he joined his cousin, the late Joseph 
Medill Patterson, in taking over control of the 
Tribune. WGN was founded in 1924. 

Col. McCormick's wife, Mrs. Maryland 
Mathison McCormick, survives. 

Knight Replaces Chatfield 
As WMAZ News Director 

BEN F. CHATFIELD, news director of WMAZ 
Macon, Ga., since 1946, has announced his 
resignation from the station, effective Friday. 
Ferrell Knight, with the WMAZ news staff 
since 1948, has been named successor by Wilton 
E. Cobb, WMAZ general manager. 

Mr. Chatfield is the holder of citations, in- 
cluding the Peabody award given by the 
Henry W. Grady School of Journalism, U. 
of Georgia. He holds the Bronze Star and 
other citations for Pacific duty in World War 




REPRESENTED BY 

H-R TELEVISION, INC. 



Page 78 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 




MR. DORRELL 



II and covered the early occupation of Japan 
and the surrender on the Missouri. 

During the Truman administration Mr. Chat- 
field was a member of the President's Radio 
& Tv Advisory Council. A former presi- 
dent of the National Assn. of Radio & Tv News 
Directors (1951) he continues to be active in the 
association's operation and is chairman of the 
convention arrangements committee. 

The WMAZ staff now includes, besides Mr. 
Knight, Orion Hudson, assistant news director, 
and Herb Kassner, tv news director. Joe An- 
drews, formerly of the staff, is now secretary 
of the Macon Chamber of Commerce. 

W. WARD DORRELL 
ELECTED BLAIR V.P. 

GREATER use of research data and technique 
in national spot selling was cited last week as 
motivating the election of W. Ward Dorrell, 
research director 
and program con- 
sultant at John Blair 
& Co. and Blair-Tv, 
to vice president. 

In announcing Mr. 
Dorrell's promotion, 
John Blair, president 
of the national rep- 
resentation firms, 
said Mr. Dorrell also 
will acquire stock. 

This additional 
emphasis on re- 
search, Mr. Blair ex- 
plained, will be re- 
flected in the new responsibilities which fall to 
Mr. Dorrell. 

These include close work with stations — in 
solving individual research problems, particu- 
larly toward improvement of local program 
quality; with agency research directors and 
timebuying departments — toward improving 
understanding and effective use of available re- 
search in the spot field, and with Blair sales- 
men — toward similar improvement in their 
knowledge and use of research techniques with 
a view to increasing national spot sales. 

Mr. Blair said the election of Mr. Dorrell 
"highlights the increasing importance of re- 
search of all types in national spot selling, par- 
ticularly as it applies to the increasing impor- 
tance of local programming to radio stations 
today, and the application of research thinking 
to such problems as station rates." 

He cited a three-year study made by Mr. 
Dorrell of local programming trends on Blair- 
represented stations. This analysis, he said, 
proved that "properly programmed stations can 
increase audiences substantially against tele- 
vision competition." In the markets studied, 
Mr. Blair said, daytime local audience in- 
creased an average of 24% between 1952 and 
1955. 

Mr. Dorrell, a vice president of C. E. Hooper 
Inc. for nine years, joined Blair in 1951. 

WXYZ-TV Boosts to 316 Kw 
With New 50 Kw Transmitter 

TWO-YEAR program to achieve maximum 
transmitting power by WXYZ-TV Detroit, on 
ch. 7, reportedly was climaxed last Friday with 
the final installation of super power equipment, 
including a 50 kw transmitter. The station at 
that time was due to boost its power to the 
maximum 316 kw video, 158 kw audio. 

The power increase involved the installa- 
tion of approximately $250,000 worth of equip- 
ment, James G. Riddell, president, said. The 
change also makes it possible for the station 
to transmit color programs, Mr. Riddell added. 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 




NORFOLK. 



leacfe ihc 

hzswess* qm 



According to data released in February by 
B C Forbes & Sons Publishing Company, Nor- 
folk was at that time the best city in the nation 
in business gain over last year (up 1 4%). 
WTAR-TV blankets not only Norfolk, Virgin- 
ia's no. 1 city, but all of prosperous northeast 
North Carolina and eastern Virginia including 
Richmond. Put your advertising dollars to 
work in a market where business is brisk. 
They'll work best on WTAR-TV. 




By Mward P«try A C»„ tot. 



channel 3 
NORFOLK 



April 4, 1955 • Page 79 



Boiling Co. Forms 
Three New Divisions 

FORMATION of three new divisions of The 
Boiling Co., representative firm, was announced 
last week by George W. Boiling, president. 

Robert Hill Boiling was named head of the 
radio department. The new television depart- 
ment will be headed by G. Richard Swift. 
Special events department, whose creation was 
described as an innovation in the field, will be 
headed by Edwin A. Pancoast Jr. 

R. H. Boiling has been in the representative 
field for 20 years. Working with him in the 
department will be Lloyd Raskopf, previously 
with the New York Daily News. 

Before joining Boiling in 1952, Mr. Swift 
was general manager of WCBS-TV New York. 
Don Buck, who has had 10 years with ABC, 
has been added to the tv department. 

The special events department has been cre- 
ated to handle the radio-tv representation of 




R. H. BOLLING 



MR. SWIFT 



the New York Yankees Home of Champions 
Network and the Brooklyn Dodgers network 
of stations. 

Mr Pancoast who 
heads the new de- 
partment, also is in 
charge of Boiling's 
sales development 
plan. John J. Mac- 
Donald Jr., Advertis- 
ing Research Foun- 
dation, moves to Boi- 
ling as director of re- 
search. In the sales 
development plan. 
Nancy Noonan, for- 
merly with WCAU- 
TV Philadelphia, will 
be merchandising and promotion manager. 




MR. PANCOAST 




AS WEMP Milwaukee last Monday switched to 1250 kc with 5 kw, WRIT there, a new 
station, took over the former's facilities (1340 kc with 250 w) and physical assets, which 
it purchased. L to r: seated, Andrew M. Spheeris, WEMP president; James Foster, WRIT 
president; standing, Hugh K. Boice, WEMP vice president-general manager; Barton 
McLendon; Gordon McLendon, WRIT vice president; Ray Hamilton, Blackburn-Hamilton, 
station brokers, and Bill Weaver, WRIT general manager. 



French Named by WNOE 

STEPHEN C. FRENCH has been named vice 
president and general manager of WNOE New 
Orleans succeeding James E. Gordon who has 
resigned [B*T, March 28], it was announced by 
James A. Noe, station owner and president. 

WARM Names Dawson as V.P. 

WILLIAM M. DAWSON, general manager of 
WARM - AM - TV 
Scranton, Pa., has 
been elected vice 
president, Martin F. 
Memelo, president 
of licensee Union 
Broadcasting Co., 
has announced. Mr. 
Dawson, who joined 
the WARM stations 
in 1940, has been 
general manager 
since 1950 and sec- 
retary of the com- 
pany since 1953. He 
was graduated from 
the University of Pennsylvania. 




MR. DAWSON 



THE LATEST 

WCKY 



[Get ALL The Audience This Spring and Summer 



"Out of Home" Listeners in the 
Cincinnati Market Area, Tune to 
WCKY PREDOMINANTLY 

*Av. Summer "Out of Home" Share of Audience 
6 a.m. — 6 p.m.; Monday thru Sunday . 

WCKY 30.6% 

Net Sta. A , . 23.8% 

NetSta. B 10.8% 

Net Sta. C 5.7% . c 

_ _ _ __, * Summer 54 

Net Sta. D 8.5% Pu | se 



You Get ALL — When You Buy WCKY 




WLDB Tower Up in One Day 

STAINLESS Construction Co. in one day, 
March 16, erected a 150-ft. tower for WLDB 
Atlantic City, N. J. The new tower, type G-17, 
is the first of a new series developed by Stain- 
less Inc., North Wales, Pa., parent firm of 
Stainless Construction. Walter L. Guzewicz is 
president of both companies. Leroy Bremmer 
is owner and general manager of WLDB. 

REPRESENTATIVE PEOPLE 

Harry B. Simmons, formerly with NBC-TV 
sales dept., to Boiling Co., as account executive. 

Albert W. Oberhofer joins the Boiling Co. as 
account executive. 

George A. Baron, KOWL Santa Monica, Calif., 
manager, named vice president and signed to 
seven-year contract with station. 

STATION PEOPLE 

M. Franklyn Warren, formerly account execu- 
tive, Howard M. Irwin & Assoc. (adv. agency), 
Los Angeles, appointed sales manager, KULA 
Honolulu. Bill Heaton, field merchandising 
representative, KTTV (TV) Hollywood, to 
KULA-TV as account executive. 

Ken Kilmer, general manager, KBOE Oska- 
loosa, Iowa, has been named general manager, 
WMPvI Marion, Ind. Glen Stanley, commercial 




MR. KILMER 



MR. STANLEY 



manager of KBOE, has been named general 
manager to succeed Mr. Kilmer. 



Jack Reeves, account executive, KSTV Stephen 



Page 80 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



ville, Tex., to KTAN Sherman, Tex., as station 
manager. 

William C. O'Donnell, assistant sales manager, 
KXOK St. Louis, 
promoted to head of 
commercial dept. 

Col. Edgerton Mer- 
rill, formerly with 
U. S. Air Force and 
lately engaged in 
management consul- 
tant work, to WOL 
Washington as as- 
sistant to president, 
for sales promotion. 

MR. O'DONNELL Char,e f Martin a P" 

pomted field mer- 
chandising representative, KTTV (TV) Holly- 
wood, Calif. 

Lee Curran, publicity director, KDKA Pitts- 
I burgh, to KTRK-TV 
Houston, Tex., as 
promotion manager. 

Jim Harmon, pro- 
gram director and 
assistant operational 
manager, K O T V 

i (TV) Tulsa, Okla., 
to KFMB-TV San 

I Diego, Calif., as pro- 
gram director. 

Vince Leonard 

named WISH-TV 
Indianapolis news 
director. John Fraim appointed WISH news 
director. Karl Eisele, formerly with KAOK 
Lake Charles, La., to WISH, as account execu- 
tive. 

Bud Gillis, children's personality, WLWC (TV) 
Columbus, Ohio, as- 
s u m e s additional 
duties as station pro- 
gram director. 

Robert Hodges, pro- 
ducer, WNEW New 
York, appointed pro- 
duction supervisor. 

Fay Martin, copy- 
writer, WHLI 
Hempstead, N. Y., 
appointed continuity 
director. MR. GILLIS 

Edith M. Carolin, formerly with WTVJ (TV) 
! Miami, named director of continuity, KOB Al- 
buquerque, N. M. Mary McDonald joins KOB 
production staff. Reed Upton, formerly with 
WNOX Knoxville, Tenn., to announcing staff. 

Ford Rush, western personality, appointed 
WTVP (TV) Decatur, 111., farm director. 

Peter Winn, formerly assistant to director of 
public relations, Amherst College, named di- 

j rector of public relations, educational WGBH- 

I FM-TV Boston. 

Charles Vanda, vice president in charge of tv 
and program director, WCAU-TV Philadelphia, 
and producer of CBS-TV's The Big Top circus 
show, to visit England, France, Italy and Den- 
mark in search of feature acts for his CBS-TV 
show. Mr.' Vanda, who leaves April 12 for 
London, will be joined m Paris by Glenn Gun- 
• dell, vice president of National Dairies, Seal- 
test sponsor of The Big Top. 






FACTS 



Buffalo- Niagara Falls 
is the nation's 14th 
largest market. 

WGR-TV completely 
dominates* this rich 
market, serving 447,938 
U. S. sets and a bonus 
of 407,619 in Canada. 




Channel 2 

Buffalo's favorite station 



REPRESENTATIVES — Headley-Reed 

In Canada — Andy McDermott -Toronto 

WGR-TV leads in 21 of the 24 weekday quarter-hour 
A segments between 6 PM and midnight. (Pulse) 




Broadcasting " • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 81 



•STATIONS. 




MRS. VAUGHAN 



James Duffy, formerly with Wisconsin Tele- 
phone Co. adv. dept., to WOKY Milwaukee, 
as account executive. Pat Klopatek, formerly 
account executive, Barnes Agency, Milwaukee, 
named station copy supervisor. Joan Skinner, 
previously with WOKY-TV heads WOKY 
traffic dept. 

Mark Workman named KDB Santa Barbara, 
Calif., account executive. 

Helen Wood, vice president, Richard O'Con- 
nell Inc., N. Y., to WPAT Paterson, N. J., as 
account executive. 

Leonard V. Kehl, salesman, KCSJ-TV Pueblo, 
Colo., to KLZ-TV Denver, in same capacity. 

Frazier Thomas has moved his Garfield Goose 
children's program from WBKB (TV) Chicago 
to WGN-TV there. 

Elizabeth Vaughan, women's personality, stars 
as Kay West of KEX 
Portland, Ore., Cof- 
fee with Kay West 
and Kay West Show, 
women's programs. 

Ken Conant, head of 
guest relations dept., 
KTLA (TV) Holly- 
wood, named junior 
publicist. 

Larry Berrill, news 
director, KBIG Ava- 
lon, Calif., adds an- 
nouncer duties on 
Latin Holiday and Clete Roberts World Report, 
both KCOP (TV) Hollywood. 

Don Lamond, former producer-announcer, 
KERO-AM-TV Bakersfield, to KBIG Avalon, 
Calif., as announcer, succeeding William Barn- 
ard, transferred to KBIF Fresno. 

Claude Evans, formerly with WKRG Mobile, 
Ala., appointed WDSU New Orleans an- 
nouncer. 

Dan Baxter, former instructor, Cambridge 
School of Radio & Tv, New York, to WVEC- 
AM-TV Hampton, Va., as sports announcer. 

Farrell Smith, formerly with WIS-TV Colum- 
bia, S. C, to announcing staff, WMAZ-TV 
Macon, Ga. 

Arnold Snyder, news director, WTTM Trenton, 
N. J., father of boy, Scott Lawrence, Feb. 27. 

Robert G. Peters, chief auditor, WPTZ (TV) 
Philadelphia, father of boy, Kenneth Alan, 
Feb. 25. 

Bernard Phaneuf, engineer, KNXT (TV) 
Hollywood, father of boy, Donald Harrison 
Farnsworth. 

Jack Jennings, account executive, KHJ-TV 
Hollywood, father of girl, Jodie Ann, March 3. 
Bill Brundige, sportscaster, KHJ-TV, father of 
boy, March 2. 

E. D. Rivers Jr., chairman of board, WEAS 
Decatur, Ga., father of girl, Maria Kells, 
Feb. 27. 

Ralph A. Renick, news director, WTVJ (TV) 
Miami, elected treasurer, Greater Miami pro- 
fessional chapter, Sigma Delta Chi. 

Merritt Hilliard, host, WGBS-TV Miami's 
Fishin' Roundup, appointed chairman, South 
Florida Wetlands Conservation Committee by 
National Wildlife Federation. 

Page 82 • April 4, 1955 



NETWORKS 



NETWORKS STRENGTHEN JUVENILE LURE 



'Disneyland's' astounding suc- 
cess and the prospect of an- 
other strong competitor next 
fall in ABC-TV's 'Mickey Mouse 
Theatre,' spurs the major net- 
works to blueprint ambitious 
schedules in a fight for the 
kiddie audiences during late 
afternoon and early evening. 

SPURRED by the fabulous success of Disney- 
land on ABC-TV, the major networks have 
drawn plans for an all-out war to hold and 
expand the rich juvenile market. 

NBC-TV in an effort to meet the imminent 
advent of a new ABC Disney program, Mickey 
Mouse Theatre (5-6 p.m. EST weekly, starting 
in the fall) will enlarge its Howdy Doody pro- 
gram to a full hour and change the format to 
include several additional stars, including Pinky 
Lee. 

CBS-TV meanwhile is drawing blueprints 
for an ambitious daily lineup of children's pro- 
grams in the 7:30-8 p.m. EST slots. This is 
part of the program redevelopment plan 
secretly projected at the special tv affiliates 
meeting held last month in New York. 

CBS-TV is moving up its Doug Edwards and 
the News from 7:30 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. EST 
across the board, thus leaving the 7:30-8 p.m. 
EST period available for children's fare. 

The network has already signed Cohise, 
Apache Chief in the Wednesday, 7:30-8 p.m. 
EST period. The network is also negotiating 
with General Mills for its Lone Ranger series 
(now running on ABC-TV and CBS-TV) and 
with National Biscuit Co. for Rin Tin Tin, 
currently on ABC-TV, Friday, 7:30-8 p.m. 
EST. Both advertisers are expected to decide 
on moves, if any, in about 10 days. 

'Gunsmoke' May Be on Tv 

CBS-TV is also discussing with Liggett & 
Myers the possibility of sponsoring a tv version 
of its radio series Gunsmoke in the 7:30-8 p.m. 
EST period. The Perry Como Show, heard 
three times weekly, and sponsored by Chester- 
field, 7:45-8 p.m. EST, will go off the air. 
Meanwhile, NBC-TV is expected to present 
Perry Como in an hour-long variety show, 
Saturdays, 8-9 p.m. EST (see story, page 84) 
opposite the Jackie Gleason show on CBS-TV. 

General Foods Corp. in a one time shot to 
capture the juvenile audience signed to present 
the Roy Rogers World Championship Rodeo 
starring Roy Rogers and Dale Evans, on NBC- 
TV, 8-9 p.m. EST on June 21. The show 
emanates from the Coliseum in San Antonio, 



'Peter Pan # Record Rating 

FINAL count of viewers who watched 
"Peter Pan" on NBC-TV March 7, to- 
taled 67,300,000 — reportedly the largest 
audience ever to see a network television 
show. The figure was announced last 
week by A. C. Nielsen Co., whose sur- 
vey showed the telecast received a 66.1 
rating. The study also revealed that 43 % 
of all American families saw Peter Pan 
with homes reached totaling 20,400,000. 
The Nielsen ratings do not include the 
"uncounted" audiences assembled at pub- 
lic places or at a number of parties ar- 
ranged in schools and hospitals for the 
telecast. 




MR. HENRY 



Tex. Benton & Bowles, New York, is the 
agency. 

Welch Grape Juice, long-time advertiser on 
the Howdy Doody pro.gram, is understood to 
be considering switching to the new Mickey 
Mouse series. Decision is expected through 
the agency, Kenyon & Eckhardt, New York, 
early next week. 

Henry Starts NBC News Show 

BILL HENRY last week joined the NBC news 
commentators' staff and began a regular series 
on NBC Radio on Wednesdays and Thursdays 
(9:55-10 p.m. EST). 
The program orig- 
inates in Washing- 
ton, where Mr. 
Henry has been a 
correspondent for 
more than a decade. 

Mr. Henry started 
work in radio as a 
special events an- 
nouncer in 1923 in 
Los Angeles, and 
has since worked as 
a newspaperman and 
a newscaster for sev- 
eral networks. Last 
fall he participated in the coverage of the na- 
tional elections for NBC. He is a former presi- 
dent of the Radio Correspondents' Assn. in 
Washington and an official historian for the 
Olympic Games. 

AB-PT EARNINGS UP, 
BUT NETWORKS LOSE 

Goldenson says tv operation is 

reaching competitive plane, 

and added sponsors now will 

be reflected in earnings. 

NET operating earnings of American Broad- 
casting-Paramount Theatres Inc. in 1954 in- 
creased slightly over 1953 but the ABC division 
operated at a "slightly larger loss" than in the 
preceding year. 

These highlights were provided in an annual 
report distributed to stockholders last week by 
Leonard H. Goldenson, AB-PT president. In 
his comments on the broadcasting operations, 
Mr. Goldenson offered this analysis: 

"ABC has made substantial progress during 
the year [1954], gaining greater audience and 
sponsor acceptance as a major network. Higher 
television network operating and program costs 
offset the profits from radio and ABC's five 
owned stations, and resulted in loss for the year. 
However, the network is now beginning to 
benefit from the better programs and improved 
station clearances. 

"Its Disneyland show, which reaches an esti- 
mated weekly audience of 45 million people 
and is carried over 150 stations, has, since its 
inception in the fall of 1954, rated as one of 
the top programs on television. With new pro- 
grams being readied for the coming year, in- 
cluding a daytime children's show to be pro- 
duced by Walt Disney, we feel that ABC is on 
its way toward realizing its true potential as a 
profitable division of the company." 

Total income of AB-PT for 1954, Mr. Gold- 
enson said, rose to $188,796,000 from $172,- 
196,000 for the preceding year, and net oper- 
ating earnings after taxes were $4,722,000, or 
$1.06 per share of common stock, compared 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



with $4,480,000, or $1 per share of common 
stock in 1953. 

The company's financial position was char- 
acterized by Mr. Goldenson as continuing 
"strong." Working capital was up slightly at 
$26,080,000, he said, and theatre capital ex- 
penditures were $5,862,000, of which $2,748,- 
000 was for new wide screen and sound equip- 
ment. ABC capital expenditures of $3,355,000, 
j Mr. Goldenson said, were principally for the 
increased transmitting power equipment for its 
five owned tv stations, renovation of the ABC 
center in San Francisco and other physical im- 
provements. He reported that depreciation in- 
creased from $7,466,000 to $8,390,000 in 1954, 
and added that capital expenditures are expected 
to be "much smaller" in 1955. 

The ABC loss was described by Mr. Golden- 
son as being "a reflection of the necessary ex- 
I penditures to develop the tv network from a 
! secondary to a competitive place." He pre- 
i dieted that "from this point on, each sponsored 
| program should have a beneficial effect upon 
1 the earnings of the division." 

He stated that progress was made during 
the year on strengthening the program struc- 
ture and improving station clearances, citing 
the winning of six "Emmy" awards by ABC 
as evidence of its "continued growth despite 
| keen competition." Other advances, he said, 
I were made at the five owned tv stations, where 
1 the installation of increased transmitter power 
j equipment has been completed, affording bet- 
i ter reception, extending the coverage and im- 
proving the value of these stations to adver- 
tisers. 

Mr. Goldenson reported that ABC Radio 
gross billings held close to 1953 levels. He 
said radio has continued to "show vitality, as 
I well as its ability to deliver advertisers results 
consistent with its costs." The radio set sales 
in 1954 and in previous years, Mr. Goldenson 
added, attest to its strong public appeal. 

Color tv, Mr. Goldenson observed, is ex- 
pected to attract many new advertisers and 
provide additional revenues. He said that ABC 
is "carefully studying developments in this field 
and will participate in color broadcasting when 
the number of sets in circulation is sufficient 
to warrant its use by advertisers." 

Repeat of Radio-Tv Success 
Forecast for Color Television 

THE PATTERN of boosting the American 
economy and consequently helping to raise the 
standard of living that was set by the advent 
of radio and followed by tv in the post-World 
War II period will be repeated by color tv 

j when it is "harnessed to the sale of goods and 

I services." 

j This prediction was made March 25 by 
Harry Bannister, NBC's vice president of sta- 
tion relations, in a speech before the National 
Convention of Electrical Women at the Hotel 
Statler, Detroit. 

Color tv, Mr. Bannister said, "will explode 
the American economy to a new high" and 
"markedly affect the standard of living, raising 
the old levels and broadening the base." 

The medium's "vividness and its power to 
| interest and convince," he said, "will move 
i more goods than anything hitherto known." 

I Herro to MBS Sales Post 

i APPOINTMENT of George P. Herro, for the 
past 10 years publicity and promotion manager 
of Mutual's Midwest Div., as an account ex- 
ecutive in the Chicago office was announced 
last week by Carroll Marts, director of midwest 
operations. Elizabeth Troughton, assistant to 
Mr. Herro for the past two years, has succeeded 

. him in the publicity and promotion post. 




TELEVISION TRANSMITTER DEPT., ALLEN B. DU MONT LABORATORIES INC., CLIFTON, N. J. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 83 



NBC-TV GETS NCAA 
'55 FOOTBALL RIGHTS 

NBC-TV has acquired the rights to the 1955 
National Collegiate Athletic Assn. series of 
eight national football telecasts for a price 
understood to total about $1.3 million. 

The announcement that NBC-TV had been 
awarded the rights to the games was made in 
New York on March 26 by E. L. Romney, 
chairman of the 1955 NCAA Tv Committee 
and commissioner of the Mountain States Con- 
ference. The committee had weighed bids from 
other television networks and from agencies and 
sponsors before selecting NBC-TV. 

NBC-TV's national rights cover football 
games on seven Saturday afternoons and an 
additional contest on Thanksgiving Day. Under 
the NCAA's "national-regional" plan [B # T, 
March 28], five dates are set aside for regional 
telecasting. A spokesman for the NCAA Tv 
Committee told B»T last week that discussions 
currently are underway by individual colleges 
and conferences to grant rights for the regional 
dates. 

The NCAA tv football series was on ABC- 
TV last year, and that network has acknowl- 
edged it sustained financial losses on the tele- 
casts since it had not been able to obtain a 
single national sponsor but had sold the package 
on a participating basis. NBC-TV presented 
the series in 1951 under the sponsorship of 
Westinghouse Electric Corp., and in 1952 and 
1953 for General Motors Corp. 

Pacific Conference Moves 
To Adapt NCAA Tv Policy 

THE PACIFIC Coast Conference tv and radio 
committee was authorized last week to develop 
a program for live football telecasts "within the 
scope and pattern of the National Collegiate 
Athletic Assn. formula" [B«T, March 28]. 

The NCAA formula, in general, provides that 
games may be televised on a regional basis five 
times during the 1955 season. On seven other 
Saturday afternoons and on Thanksgiving day, 
a national game-of-the-week will be televised. 

"The conference favored televising on a 
regional basis throughout the season," said 
PCC Commissioner Victor O. Schmidt in Los 
Angeles. "The NCAA formula allows consider- 
ably less, but it does present some new pos- 
sibilities in bringing college football to the 
television audience which the conference wishes 
to explore." 

Last week's action also authorized the PCC 
radio-tv committee, headed by Alfred R. Mast- 
ers of Stanford U., to develop a conference tv 
policy for the 1955-56 basketball season. 



MBS' Stock News Show 

DESIGNED to capitalize on the grow- 
ing interest of the average person in 
stock investments, a program will be 
launched on Mutual today (Monday) 
titled America's Business (Mon.-Fri., 
5:45-5:50 p.m. local time). A Mutual 
spokesman believed it was the first net- 
work-wide radio show covering business 
news. The program will be prepared 
and written by the business news staff 
of the Chicago Tribune and broadcast by 
Bruce MacFarlane. It will cover major 
business news, stock activities, and com- 
modities and credit developments as they 
affect the average American. 



ABC to Open Parley Today 
With Owned-Outlet Executives 

EXECUTIVES of ABC's nine owned radio and 
tv stations will convene in New York today 
(Monday) for a two-day meeting to discuss 
station operations and their integration with 
network operations for the 1955-56 season. 

The opening session will be attended by Leon- 
ard H. Goldenson, president of AB-PT. Robert 
E. Kinter, ABC president, will open each day's 
session. Harold L. Morgan Jr., vice president 
and controller, will preside over the joint meet- 
ings and the television sessions. Jason Rabin- 
ovitz, assistant controller, will preside over the 
radio sessions. 

Attending from New York: Michael Renault, 
acting general manager of WABC; Ted Ober- 
felder, vice president and general manager, 
WABC-TV, and Ardien B. Rodner, program man- 
ager, WABC-TV; from Detroit: James Riddell, 
president and general manager, WXYZ-AM-TV; 
Harold Christian, vice president, WXYZ, and 
John Pival, vice president, WXYZ-TV; from Chi- 
cago: Sterling C. Quinlan, vice president in charge 
of WBKB (TV), and Matthew Vieracker, treas- 
urer, ABC Central Div.; from Los Angeles: John 
S. Hansen, manager, KABC; Selig Seligman, gen- 
eral manager, KABC-TV, and Elton Rule, sales 
manager, KABC-TV; from San Francisco: James 
H. Connolly, vice president in charge of the San 
Francisco office, and David Sacks, sales manager, 
KGO-AM-TV. 

WTVY (TV) Joins CBS-TV 

AFFILIATION of WTVY (TV) Dothan, Ala., 
with CBS-TV was announced last week by 
Herbert V. Akerberg, CBS-TV vice president 
in charge of station relations. The contract is 
part of the network's Extended Market Plan 
designed to bring network tv to small market 
stations. The EMP list now numbers 21 sta- 
tions. WTVY, on ch. 9, is owned and operated 
by Alabama-Florida-Georgia Television Inc. 



Nine Colorado Stations 
Form Columbine Network 

FORMATION of the Columbine Network com- 
posed of nine Colorado radio stations with 
headquarters in Denver was announced last 
Friday by the management of the stations. 

Columbine Network assumes the name of 
a former Colorado regional organization. It j 
will cover 1.3 million of the state's 1.5 million 
people, the announcement said. The stations i 
range in power up to 5 kw. 

Columbine officers are: George Cory, KUBC I 
Montrose-Delta, KRAI Craig and KSLV Monte | 
Vista, president; Dale G. Moore, same stations, j 
vice president, and Ed E. Koepke, KMYR j 
Denver, general manager. In addition, Robert 
Kittleson, formerly of KUBC, is sales manager. 

Other Columbine member stations are: | 
KYOU Greeley, KVOR Colorado Springs, f 
KGHF Pueblo, KFXJ Grand Junction and 
KGLN Glenwood Springs. 

Central offices are at Denver's Arneill Bldg. 

ABC, NBC # NABET Contract 
Awaits Union Ratification 

ABC AND NBC and the National Assn. of 
Broadcast Employes & Technicians (CIO) 
reached agreement on a new contract last Mon- 
day and the proposed contract was submitted 
to the membership of the union for ratification. 
Final action is expected this week. 

In a statement from George Maher, execu- 
tive secretary of NABET, and officials of the | 
two networks, it was pointed out that the agree- I 
ment would run until Jan. 31, 1958. This latest | 
contract proposal is the third to be formulated; | 
two others had been rejected by the member- 
ship of the union. 

Though details of the contract were not avail- | 
able, it was reported that agreement had been 
held up because of dispute over wage scales 
of non-technical employes, jurisdiction over tv j 
film production and editing, a job security | 
provision and a pension plan at ABC. 

Como Switches to NBC-TV 

NBC-TV has signed a 12-year contract with I 
Perry Como, who will appear on a new hour- I 
long NBC-TV variety show (Saturdays). Al- j 
though unannounced, it was understood that ) 
the time period would be 8-9 p.m. Saturdays , 
opposite CBS-TV's Jackie Gleason. 

The contract was described by NBC as "one | 
of the largest financial deals in the history of 
television" and was signed by Thomas A. Mc- 
Avity, NBC-TV vice president in charge of the j 
television network, and Thomas G. Rockwell, j 
president of General Artists Corp., agency for i 
Mr. Como. Mr. Como will conclude his 
present three times weekly program on CBS- 
TV, sponsored by Chesterfield, July 1. 

The new hour-long program will go on the i 
air in October. Three sponsors will be sought. 

NETWORK PEOPLE 

Jack Smight, producer-director, NBC-TV One \ 
Man's Family, to NBC-TV New York as di- 
reetor of Philco Tv Playhouse. 

Caroline Burke, producer-director, NBC-TV, to f 
teach "Introduction to Television Production 
& Direction," fifth annual Summer Institute of 
Radio-Tv, Barnard College, N. Y., presented in 
collaboration with NBC, June 27-Aug. 5. 

Ted Bergmann, managing director, DuMont 
Television Network, hospitalized in New York 
for treatment of a gastric condition; expected 
to be back at office late this week or early 
next week. 



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Page 84 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



PROGRAM SERVICES 



PAY-TV OPPONENTS MARSHAL FORCES 



8 



ii 



Sill 



MR. HOGAN 



Newly formed Organizations 
for Free Tv join with Commit- 
tee Against Pay-As-You-See 
Tv in retaining John V. L. 
Hogan and Hogan Labs Inc. as 
engineering counsel in fight 
against subscription television. 

OPPONENTS to subscription tv took new 
organizational moves last week. 

Formed Tuesday in New York was Organi- 
zations for Free-Tv made up of "regional and 
state tv station operators," veterans organiza- 
tions, local, county and state retail associa- 
tions, hospital service groups, and various other 
organizations including theatre operators and 
^ msxmmmximim!m ^ ms!mm restaurant owners. 

In announcing the 
formation, spokes- 
men also said an "in- 
formation center" to 
assist various organi- 
zations throughout 
| the country which 
wish to make known 
l their views to the 
FCC has been set up 
at 608 Fifth Ave., 
New York. 

On Wednesday, 
that organization 
and another, the 
Committee Against Pay-As- You-See Tv, an- 
nounced they had jointly retained John V. L. 
Hogan and Hogan Labs Inc. The Hogan firm 
will act as engineering counsel and conduct 
research and prepare studies into technical 
aspects of petitions now before the FCC seek- 
ing adoption of subscription tv, it was explained. 

Co-chairmen Alfred Starr and Trueman T. 
Rembusch of the Committee Against Pay Tv 
said they were "confident" that Mr. Hogan and 
his firm would "develop information that will 
be most useful to the Commission." 

Mr. Hogan's findings will be filed with the 
FCC by the committee's legal counsel, Marcus 
Cohn of the Washington law firm of Cohn & 
Marks. Along with the engineering studies, an 
economic analysis being prepared by Dr. Dallas 
Smythe of the U. of Illinois, also retained in 
consultant capacity, will be filed with the Com- 
mission. 

The Organizations for Free-Tv, which actu- 
ally is working together with the Committee 
Against Pay-As-You-See Tv, said its member 
groups have been sent "preliminary studies" 
showing that conversion of tv sets for "de- 
coders" to unscramble subscription-tv signals 
"would impose a severe economic hardship on 
the viewing public running into hundreds of 
millions of dollars." A survey is being made, 
it said, on weekly and annual program costs 
under the proposed subscription tv systems. 

OFT, asserting that diversion of "free tv" 
channels to the fee system would not be in 
the public interest and that it would mean an 
eventual disappearance of commercial sponsor- 
ship, said it will conduct "educational" cam- 
paigns on the local, regional and state level. 

Anti-Toll Tv Committee 
Promised Turn on 'Omnibus 7 

CBS-TV's Omnibus on March 27, dealing with 
toll television, prompted a protest from the 
Committee Against Pay-as-you-See Tv and a 
subsequent reassurance that the network will 
schedule another program to insure full treat- 



ment of the committee's viewpoint. The show 
is produced by the Radio-Tv Workshop of the 
Ford Foundation. 

The committee protested by telegram to CBS- 
TV and the Workshop, claiming that a film 
sequence of George Storer, president of Storer 
Broadcasting Co., and an opponent of pay-as- 
you-see tv, was faulty and could not be seen or 
heard as clearly as films of proponents of 
toll tv. 

Robert Saudek, director of the Workshop, 
acknowledged that the sequence in question was 
of "somewhat inferior recording quality" but 
insisted it was "sufficiently intelligible to me." 
Frank Stanton, president of CBS, agreed in a 
telegram that the committee's viewpoint had not 
been given "full justice" and suggested that 
another program be scheduled after April 10 in 
the same period, with Mr. Storer invited to 
present his views. 

The committee last Wednesday recommended 
to Mr. Stanton that another program be set for 
April 24, pointing out that May 9 is the current 
deadline for filing reports with the FCC on the 
question of subscription tv. 

75 Stations Sign Contracts 
For New RCA Thesaurus Plan 

SIGNING of 75 local radio outlets for "Shop 
at the Store with the Mike on the Door," new 
local radio promotion and merchandising plan 
recently announced by RCA Thesaurus ([B*T, 
March 21] was reported last week by the tran- 
scription firm. 

By participating in the plan a station receives 
voice tracks recorded by well-known stars 
plugging the overall theme of the promotion. 
Sponsors are supplied with decals carrying sta- 
tion call letters which signify that the store 
displaying the emblem is a member of "Shop 
at the Store with a Mike at the Door." 

Thesaurus is also furnishing stations with 
sales brochures that outline the plan as well 
as a 25-page "operating manual," which gives 
details and offers suggestions on how the plan 
can be exploited locally. Stations also receive 
promotion kits containing spots, photos, pub- 
licity stories, ad mats and tie-in art. 

CARE Liked 'Album' C-C; 
415 Pay to See in L. A. 

SATISFACTION of CARE Inc. with the 
closed-circuit telecast of the American Na- 
tional Theatre & Academy's Album of Broad- 
way by the DuMont Television Network was 
expressed by Paul Comly French, executive di- 
rector of the relief organization, who termed 
the telecast "an unusual marriage for television, 
theatre and charity." 

The telecast last Monday, created by ANTA, 
was sponsored by CARE. All television facili- 
ties, including the producer, director and theatre, 
were made available for the telecast by Du- 
Mont, Mr. French said. The show was seen in 
3 1 theatres throughout the country. 

Net proceeds from the ANTA show, which 
is an annual theatrical event, will be divided 
between CARE and ANTA. 

Only 415 persons paid the $5-to-$10 admis- 
sion to see the ANTA closed-circuit tv showing 
from New York in the Fox Wilshire Theatre, 
Los Angeles. 

PROGRAM SERVICE SHORTS 

Song Ads Co., radio-tv singing, jingle firm, and 
Peter Randell, theatrical agent, both Hollywood, 
have formed Randell-Song Ads Productions to 
produce live music-quiz program, Story Behind 



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Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 



Page 85 



PROGRAM SERVICES 



Your Song, featuring pianist-humorist Oscar 
Levant and a guest panel. 

Alvin E. Unger, vice president in charge of 
of sales, Frederic W. Ziv Co., N. Y., announced 
last week that the Eddie Cantor Show, radio 
series packaged by Ziv, has been sold in a 
total of 114 markets. Program is for sale on 
a spot, single half-hour unit or across-the- 
board basis. 

Oertel Brewing Co. (Oertel's beer), Louisville, 
Ky., through M. R. Kopmeyer Co., same city, 
and P. F. Peterson Baking Co. (Peter Pan and 
Betsy Ross breads), Omaha, through Allen & 
Reynolds Adv., same city, name Song Ads Co. 
(radio-tv singing commercials), Hollywood, to 
create radio-tv spot announcement series. 

Wayne Steffner Productions, Hollywood, has 
syndicated radio program, Art Baker's Note- 
book, starting on WKY Oklahoma City, KOMO 
Seattle, KEX Portland (Ore.), KARM Fresno 
(Calif.) and KCRA Sacramento, Calif., bring- 
ing total stations to 20. 

PROGRAM SERVICE PEOPLE 
Ervin J. Brabec, MCA, N. Y., elected vice presi- 
dent and will direct firm's industrial div. 

Frank Mullen, former NBC executive vice presi- 
dent and former president, Vitapix Corp., 
Hollywood; Mrs. Florence Mullen, former ex- 
ecutive assistant to Brig. Gen. David Sarnoff, 
RCA-NBC board chairman and Allen Buckley, 
former ABC-TV executive, form Mullen-Buck- 
ley Corp., Hollywood tv and business manage- 
ment consultants, with offices at 8949 Sunset 
Blvd. Telephone: Bradshaw 2-1764. 

Fred Darwin, announcer, WPAT Paterson, N. J., 
forms Broadcast Coaching Assoc. (disc m.c. 
school), 1697 Broadway, N. Y. 



MANUFACTURING 




9^ 



DANCE WITH ME 
HENRY 

RECORDED BY 

1 GEORGIA GIBBS Mercury I 

I LESLIE SISTERS Marble 

1 ETTA JAMES — 

THE PEACHES Modern 

I THREE RAYS Coral I 

I LEE WINTERS Crown 1 

PUBLISHED BY 
MODERN MUSIC PUBLISHING CO. 



RCA ASKS FOR ANTITRUST DISMISSAL, 
SAYS PATENT LICENSES AID GROWTH 

Electronics manufacturer denies all allegations in the Justice Dept. 
suit. Firm says its licenses contain no restrictions and that they are 
granted to competitors on reasonable terms. It says electronics lead- 
ership is 'by example, not by control/ 




ASSERTING that its patent licensing policies 
have aided the growth of the electronics in- 
dustry, including radio and tv, RCA last week 
moved for dismissal of a government civil anti- 
trust suit of last November [At Deadline, 
Nov. 22, 1954]. 

The Justice Dept. suit, pending in U. S. 
District Court in New York, had attacked RCA's 
patent system and practices. It charged RCA 
with monopolizing and conspiring to restrain 
competition in the radio-tv licensing business. 

RCA called the government's request for re- 
lief "unreasonable, unnecessary and contrary 
to the public interest." In its brief, filed with 
the court by John T. Cahill of the New York 
law firm of Cahill, Gordon Reindel & Ohl, RCA 
denied all allegations in the Justice complaint 
that had charged violation of the Sherman Act. 

RCA said its electronics leadership has been 
"by example, not by control in any way, shape 
or form" and if it had been "followed, it is 
because RCA's courage, vision and foresight 
have been right and RCA has acted in the best 
interests of the industry and the public, and 
not through any dominance, restraint or 
control." 

Allegations that RCA engaged in "package 
licensing" or had compelled prospective li- 
censees to accept licenses under more patents 
than they wanted, the brief declared RCA 
"grants patent licenses to competitors and others 
on reasonable and non-discriminatory terms and 
without restriction." 

Licenses from RCA, the brief asserted, "con- 
tain no restrictions as to price, quantity, terri- 
tory, or anything else, require no minimum 
royalty, and are offered under any one or more 
patents and for any apparatus as may be desired 
by any prospective licensee. 

RCA Royalties Reduced 

"RCA's present royalty rates are further re- 
duced, now being only Vj of 1% for radio 
broadcast receivers using tubes, \Vs% for ra- 
dio broadcast receivers using transistors, \Va% 
for black-and-white television receivers, 1 3 A% 
for color television receivers, VA% for electron 
tubes other than color tubes, 1%% for color 
tubes, 2% for color television commercial ap- 
paratus except government apparatus, 1 Vi % for 
other commercial apparatus except government 
apparatus, and 1% for all commercial appara- 
tus manufactured for government use." 

RCA, in discussing patents and rates, also 
made these points: 

• Its license agreements provide for various 
deductions "which make the actual rates even 
lower." Royalty rates are based on the manu- 
facturer's selling price, and when applied to re- 
tail selling prices to the public, rates are "sub- 
stantially cut in half." 

• Its royalty rates "compare most favorably 
with those of other licensors" both within and 
outside of the electronics industry. In return, 
licensees can obtain a license "under, or using, 
any one or more patents under which RCA has 
the right to grant licenses." This policy has 
resulted in RCA licensees having "complete 
freedom to manufacture apparatus in com- 



petition with RCA under any and all patents 
available to RCA. . . ." 

To substantiate its statement that no restraint 
of industry is involved in the suit, RCA detailed 
the rapid progress of the electronics industry, 
the appearance of large numbers of independent 
companies making and selling tv receivers in 
open and active competition with RCA, and in- 
creases of receiver sales. RCA said it "admits 
that more people buy RCA television receivers 
than any other make of television receiver and 
that more station owners buy RCA television 
transmission equipment than any other make." 
But, the brief asserted, in all categories of 
radio and tv equipment, "intense and effective 
competition" exist. 

In its suit, the Justice Dept. had charged that 
since 1932 RCA had attempted to monopolize 
radio-tv research, patent holdings, patent ac- 
quisition and issuance and exchange of radio-tv 
patent licenses. 

Charges Refuted 

RCA denied each of these allegations. The 
firm contested the complaint on research by 
noting that it had spent more money on re- 
search and development during 1951 than it 
had received in royalty payments that year 
and under its patent licenses had made "avail- 
able" the results to its "competitors and others 
on reasonable and non-discriminatory terms 
and without restriction or additional charge." 
Additionally, RCA listed "many other substan- 
tial competitors" which have large resources 
for research and development in the radio and 
tv field. 

RCA also pointed out that it had spent more 
than $50 million on development, research and 
promotion of black-and-white tv before realiz- 
ing any profit from its expenditures and a like 
amount on compatible color. RCA said it is 
still pioneering color tv activities at a "substan- 
tial loss." 

In its brief, RCA said it admitted that "sub- 
stantially all radio-television manufacturers lo- 
cated in many of the states and territories of 
the United States and the District of Columbia 
are licensed by RCA." But, it said, its policy 
of licensing patents to competitors and others 
"on reasonable and non-discriminatory terms 
and without restriction" helped increase the 
number of tv receivers in public hands and to a 
continued lowering of their price. 

Explaining the cross-licensing by RCA, the 
brief traced the history of the corporation when 
it was formed in 1919 at the urgence of the 
government and the setting up then of patent 
cross-licenses with General Electric, American 
Telephone & Telegraph Co., Westinghouse and 
others. 

These cross-licenses, RCA said, were to free 
the industry, for without them it would have 
been "paralyzed by conflicting patent holdings 
and endless patent litigation." Also cited was 
the consent decree of the '30s which provided 
for GE, AT&T and Westinghouse to dispose of 
stock in RCA and for new cross-licenses to be 
drawn up. 

The agreements were reaffirmed by the courts 
in 1942, RCA said, as the best way to continue 
the growth of a competitive radio-tv industry 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

589 FIFTH AVE, NEW YORK 36 

HIW YORK • CttlCAM ■ H0UTK00D <,TW(MT0 . MONTRM? 



Page 86 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



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free from restraint. As recently as last year, 
RCA said, the court reasserted that the cross- 
license pacts were approved by the consent de- 
cree. 

RCA declared: "These agreements expired 
by their terms on Dec. 31, 1954, so far as new 
inventions are concerned. Yet the complaint 
filed only six weeks before this expiration is 
an attack on these very agreements which were 
recommended and stated to be in the public 
interest by the government in 1932." 

In its brief, RCA averred that the complaint 
failed to state a claim upon which relief can 
be granted. It said that "each and every claim 
for relief proposed to set forth in the com- 
plaint is barred by the doctrine of res judicata. 

RCA Plea to Postpone 
Chicago Trial Denied 

RCA appeal to the Supreme Court to force 
postponement of the Chicago $16 million, 
treble-damage, antitrust suit by Zenith Radio 
Corp., was denied last week. The Supreme 
Court, in a brief order, rejected the appeal. 

This paved the way for resumption of the 
multi-million dollar suit in the Chicago Fed- 
eral Court [B»T, Nov. 22, 1954, et seq.]. Pend- 
ing is a similar suit in Delaware Federal Court. 
RCA's contention was that the Delaware trial 
should be held first. Both suits involve RCA 
patents and licensing arrangements. 

Former Democratic Presidential candidate 
Adlai E. Stevenson represented RCA in the 
appeal. It was Mr. Stevenson's first case be- 
fore the Supreme Court since the 1952 elec- 
tions. 

Stromberg-Carlson Sales 
Decline; Net Earnings Up 

NET SALES for all divisions of Stromberg- 
Carlson Co., Rochester, N. Y., declined to 
$63,509,429 in 1954 from $65,241,861 in 1953, 
but net earnings rose to $1,981,754 from $1,- 
667,308 in 1953, according to the company's 
annual report made public last week. 

After provision for preferred dividends, the 
report states, net earnings per common share 
amounts to $3.65 on each of the 509,1 15 shares, 
as compared to $3.40 on each of the 484,551 
shares outstanding at the end of 1953. 

The radio-television division during 1954 
shipped 31% more television receiver units 
than in 1953 and sold them at approximately 
$50 more per unit than the industry average, 
it was reported. 

In the broadcasting phases of the company's 
operations, the report said, WHAM-TV Roch- 
ester switched channels from 6 to 5, accom- 
panied by an increase in power to 100 kw. 

Two Cuba Tv Networks 
Install RCA Transmitters 

TWO RCA television transmitters are being 
installed at the key stations of Television Na- 
tional and CMQ-TV networks in Havana, it 
was announced last week by Meade Brunet, 
vice president of RCA and managing director 
of the RCA International Div. 

The transmitters, raising to seven the total 
number of RCA-built tv transmitters in Cuba, 
will be installed in the same building and share 
the same tower facilities. Mr. Brunet noted that 
Havana, with five stations, has more than any 
city outside the U. S. Four of these stations, 
he said, have been built by RCA. 

Mr. Brunet reported that both Television 
Nacional and CMQ-TV are expanding tv net- 
work services to their other stations in Santa 
Clara, Camaguey and Santiago de Cuba. 




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3. A position remote control system 
designed and built by the same 
manufacturer. 

The remote control system that uses 
only DC circuits — with conventional 
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5. The remote control system that in- 
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MANUFACTURING COMPANY 




4212 S. Buckner Blvd. 



Dallas 27, Texas 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 87 



MANUFACTURING • 



GE Conferences Highlight 
Basic Tv Lighting Problems 

FUNDAMENTALS of black-and-white tv, 
color tv and studio lighting will highlight 
two 2-day Tv Studio Lighting Conferences to 
be held in the General Electric Lighting Insti- 
tute at Nela Park, Cleveland, April 4 through 7. 

Discussions and demonstrations will be pre- 
sented by GE lighting specialists and guest 
speakers from tv stations. Special attention 
will be focused on studio lighting problems and 
their solutions. 

The clinics will be conducted in a model 
demonstration studio which will have a 65 kw 
connectable lighting load. Black-and-white and 
color tv cameras will take pictures of the ac- 
tual lighting situations created. These will be 
monitored so that the relative values of the 
lighted sets can be compared. Climax of each 
of the two conferences will be a session devoted 
to progress in color tv. 

GE Appoints Beldon 

APPOINTMENT of Jack S. Beldon as man- 
ager of marketing for the radio-tv department 
of General Electric Co., Syracuse, N. Y., was 
announced last Friday by Herbert H. Riegel- 
man, general manager of the department. He 
replaces Eugene F. Peterson, now manager of 
International General Electric Co.'s consumer 
goods export department. 

Mr. Beldon joined GE in 1953 handling 
special assignments in the company's marketing 
operation in New York. 

RCA Cuts Vidicon Price 

REDUCTION in the retail price of the vidicon 
television camera tube (RCA-6198) from $345 
to $315 was announced last week by Lee F. 
Holleran, general marketing manager of the 
tube division, RCA. This marks the second 
reduction since commercial introduction of the 
tube in 1952. 

The reduced price was made possible, Mr. 
Holleran explained, because of "constantly in- 
creasing applications of the vidicon. 





4 Ilea sons Why 

The foremost notional and local ad- 
vertisers use WEVD year after 
year to reach the vast 
Jewish Market 
of Metropolitan New York 
1. Top adult programming 
2. Strong audience impact 
3. Inherent listener loyalty 
1 4. Potential buying power 

Send for a copy of 

"WHO'S WHO ON WEVD" 
Henry Greenfield, Managing Director 
WEVD 117-119 Watt 46th St., 
Haw York 19 



Electronic Typesetting 

NEW DEVICE seen futuristically as an 
electronic means of typesetting has been 
developed by RCA. The new product 
was described as an electron-image 
tube that can translate coded sig- 
nals from tape, keyboard or radio into 
clearly defined letters and figures at a 
speed of up to 100,000 words per minute 
for high-speed photographic recording. 

When it achieves commercial form, an 
RCA spokesman said, its initial applica- 
tion is likely to be in electronic message 
transmission and computing systems. Fur- 
ther development is expected to fit it for 
wider application in general printing. The 
new tube was developed by Warren H. 
Bliss and John E. Ruedy under the super- 
vision of C. J. Young and Dr. G. A. 
Morton of the technical staff of RCA's 
David Sarnoff Research Center. 



New Microphone Developed 

ELECTROVERT Inc., New York, has an- 
nounced the introduction of a new microphone, 
designed especially for tv and motion picture 
studios. Unique feature, according to Gustav 
Szabo, vice president, is its built-in low fre- 
quency equalizer which automatically eliminates 
"rumble and hum." The new microphone will 
be sold and serviced by Camera Equipment 
Co., New York. 

MANUFACTURING PEOPLE 

Matthew D. Burns, general manager, electronic 
tube operations, Syl- 
vania Electric Prod- 
ucts Inc., N. Y., 
elected vice presi- 
dent of the company. 

Douglas Wallace, as- 
sistant vice president, 
Graybar Electric 
Co., N. Y., elected 
vice president. 

Robert L. Jablonski, 

western district sales 
manager, Hoffman 
Electronics Corp., 
L. A., radio-tv set manufacturers, named na- 
tional service manager. 

A. H. Jackson, sales manager, tower dept., 
equipment div., Blaw-Knox Co., Pittsburgh, 
named general manager, division's engineering 
and development dept. Robert A. Troman, as- 
sistant sales manager, tower dept., promoted to 
sales manager of dept. 




MR. BURNS 



INTERNATIONAL 



CKNW Sale on Heavy Agenda 
Facing CBC Board April 15 

BOARD of governors of the Canadian Broad- 
casting Corp., to meet in Ottawa on April 15, 
will consider a number of important transfers 
of ownership in radio stations, applications for 
four new radio and two new tv stations and 
changes in some CBC regulations. 

The Canadian inter-provincial Rugby Foot- 
ball Union is asking the CBC board to change 
regulations permitting reconstruction of play- 
by-play broadcasts of sporting events. The new 
regulations would require permission from the 
participating organizations and clear identifica- 
tion every 15 minutes that the broadcast is re- 
constructed. 

New tv licenses are being requested by CJOC 
Lethbridge, for ch. 7 with 102.8 kw video and 
57.7 kw audio, and by CFCY Charlottetown, 
for ch. 13 with 21 kw video and 12.5 kw audio. 

Am licenses are being applied for by Greg- 
May Broadcasting Ltd., at Lindsay, Ont., for 
1 kw on 910 kc; John William Pellie, at Smith 
Falls, Ont., for 250 w on 1070 kc; Jean La- 
londe, at St. Jerome, Que., for 1 kw on 900 kc, 
and Phillip Bodnoff, at Weyburn, Sask., for 
250 w on 1340 kc. 

Control of CKNW New Westminster, B. C, 
5 kw station on 1320 kc, has been sold for an 
undisclosed sum to the Southam Co. Ltd., Van- 
couver, subject to CBC board approval. New 
controlling ownership also owns daily Van- 
couver Province; shares in CFAC Calgary and 
Calgary Herald; CJCA Edmonton and the Ed- 
monton Journal; CKOY Ottawa, and CHCH- 
TV Hamilton, through CJSH-FM Hamilton 
and the Hamilton Spectator. 

William Rea Jr., president of International 
Broadcasting Co., which relinquishes CKNW, 
said that the sale was for reasons of personal 
health. Following a fire at CKNW in May of 
last year, Mr. Rea collapsed and since then 
has been recuperating in California. Bill Hughes 
has been managing CKNW. No changes in 
personnel or program policy are planned by 
the new owners. 

Transfer of control also is being requested 
for CKOV Kelowna, B. C; VOCM St. John's, 
Nfld., and CFDA Victoriaville, Que. 

CKRD Red Deer, Alta., is asking for a 
change in frequency from 850 kc to 1440 kc 
with 1 kw power. 

Dunton Says Union Demands 
Prevent Program Exchange 

CANADIAN entertainment unions are pricing 
themselves out of the U. S. market by seeking 
large extra payments for Canadian Broadcast- 
ing Corp. programs requested for U. S. net- 
works, it was indicated last week. A. D. Dun- 
ton, CBC board chairman, told the Canadian 
Parliamentary Committee on Broadcasting at 
Ottawa on March 24 that Canadian talent and 



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ERCE 



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• Beats Network Station B Twelve Times! ♦Beats Indie Station B Twelve Times! 

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Beats Indie Station A Twelve Times! 



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Salesman F0R25 years 



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Page 88 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



EDUCATION 



creative work is not being heard outside Canada 
because of such union demands. 

Mr. Dunton told the members of the 
Canadian Parliament that exchange programs 
from the U. S. carried on Canadian radio net- 
works and television stations carry no such 
extra payments. He said Canadian unions 
want CBC, U. S. networks or individual U. S. 
stations to pay talent costs for programs origi- 
nating in Canada and that this is keeping pro- 
grams from being sent as exchange features to 
U. S. networks. 

He also pointed to agreements with musi- 
cians unions which require stand-by orchestras 
when amateur musicians are used, although the 
union musicians do nothing. CBC was asked 
by the committee to report how much was paid 
union musicians in the past year for stand-by 
purposes. Mr. Dunton was asked what action 
the unions would take if the CBC tried to use 
amateur performers without stand-by payments. 
He told the committee that although the word 
"strike" was never used, the CBC had been told 
forcibly and at some length that the musicians 
union would not have the services of its mem- 
bers available to the CBC. 

Mr. Dunton also said that it was difficult to 
obtain enough good Canadian scripts for tv 
dramatic programs, even though every effort 
was being made to encourage Canadian writers. 

European Set Count Shows 
British Domination in Tv 

OF THE 3,742,000 tv receivers in use in 
Western Europe at the end of 1954, 3.5 million 
are in the British Isles — leaving 242,000 for 
the eight countries on the Continent. 

This information was reported by the Bureau 
of Foreign Commerce of the Dept. of Com- 
merce in a trade information service pamphlet 
entitled "Foreign Television Development" 
(Part 4, No. 55-2). 

Inadequate revenue for programming and 
technical development and the present high cost 
of receivers were cited as the two major draw- 
backs to more rapid expansion of tv in Europe. 

During the first experimental Eurovision tele- 
cast — linking eight countries in a single telecast 
— 18 programs were televised, the study re- 
ported. The international hookup took place 
during the period from June 6 to July 4, 1954, 
and linked Italy, Switzerland, West Germany, 
Denmark, Netherlands, Belgium, France and 
Great Britain. 

CBC Promotes Three 

THREE SENIOR administrative changes at 
the Canadian Broadcasting Corp.'s head office 
in Ottawa have been announced. 

Marcel Carter, director of personnel and ad- 
ministrative services, has been appointed execu- 
tive assistant. His new post will be the co- 
ordination of radio and integrated services. 
C. E. Stiles, with CBC and its predecessor since 
1933, becomes director of personnel and ad- 
ministrative services. Kenneth M. Kelly, with 
CBC since 1939 and for past year planning and 
development officer in the personnel and ad- 
ministrative division, has been appointed as- 
sistant director of the division. 

Tv Set Sales Up in Canada 

IN the first two months of 1955 a total of 
111,386 tv receivers valued at $35,331,344 were 
sold in Canada, compared to 73,675 sets in the 
same period of 1954, according to the Radio- 
Television Mfrs. Assn. of Canada. 



JCET APPOINTS 
JORGENSEN HEAD 

JOINT COMMITTEE on Educational Tele- 
vision, meeting in Washington last week, chose 
as chairman at its annual election Dr. Albert 
N. Jorgensen, president of the U. of Con- 
necticut and the JCET representative of the 
National Assn. of State Universities. 

The organization, beginning its fifth year of 
activity, named as vice chairman Dr. Edgar 
Fuller, executive secretary of the Council of 
Chief State School officers. 

JCET also announced that the American 
Assn. of School Administrators has been added 
to its membership. Dr. Worth McClure, AASA 
executive secretary, will represent the group on 
the JCET. 

NBC-TV Operas Are for All # 
Stanley Tells Chicago Meet 

NBC-TV operas in English are creating an "ex- 
citing new art form" in line with the network's 
objective to assume a social responsibility to 
the entire American population and not just 
cultural groups, Edward Stanley, NBC man- 
ager of public service programs for radio-tv, 
said March 25 in a speech before the Chicago 
Area Educational Television Conference at the 
Illinois Institute of Technology. He charged 
wide exposure of cultural fare by radio-tv is 
often resented by some "intellectuals," and 
claimed the recent NBC-TV production of Peter 
Pan demonstrates it is possible to make "some- 
thing spectacularly fine" available to the Ameri- 



can people. Mr. Stanley spoke on "educational 
programming for networks." 

In another talk, Harry K. Newburn, director 
of the Educational Television & Radio Center, 
Ann Arbor, Mich., asserted the educational tv 
movement is "beset with problems of all kinds 
and descriptions." Among trouble spots he cited 
( 1 ) failure of community-type stations to re- 
solve hardships in organization and long range 
support; (2) delays in delivery of equipment; 
(3) problems of staff members in learning 
operation of equipment and inexperience of sta- 
tion personnel, and (4) difficulties of producers 
in coordinating the work of teacher with that 
of professional. 

Weed Scholarships Announced 

THE WEED Broadcasting Scholarship, estab- 
lished by Joseph Weed, president of Weed & 
Co., station representative, for students apply- 
ing radio and tv to a major field of study at 
Iowa State College, Ames, has been announced 
by WOI-TV there, station owned by the col- 
lege. The scholarship, an annual award of 
$500, will be presented to a senior or graduate 
student now enrolled at an accredited school. 

Applications, to be submitted prior to May 2, 
may be obtained from Richard B. Hull, Direc- 
tor of Radio-Television, Iowa State College. 

WIBW Awards Scholarships 

SCHOLARSHIPS worth $250 have been pre- 
sented to two Kansas State College students by 
WIBW Topeka for their 4-H Club achievement, 
leadership and community service, J. Harold 
Johnson, state club leader, has announced. 
The winners are Jane Mills, freshman in ele- 
mentary education, and Sylvester Nyhart, fresh- 
man in speech. 



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April 4, 1955 • Page 89 



KANS, WBZ-TV WIN 
GOLD MEDAL AWARDS 

Wichita and Boston stations re- 
ceive top public service awards 
in fire safety and fire preven- 
tion from National Board of 
Fire Underwriters. 

GOLD Medal Awards of the National Board of 
Fire Underwriters. New York, have been won 
by KANS Wichita. Kan., and WBZ-TV Boston 
for outstanding public service in fire prevention 
and fire safety during 1954. Winners were an- 
nounced last Thursday by J. Victor Herd, presi- 
dent of the National Board and executive vice 
president of the American Fore, group of in- 
surance companies. The Kalamazoo (Mich.) 
Gazette and Illinois Valley News, Cave Junc- 
tion, Ore., also received gold medals. 

In addition to the gold medal winners, re- 
cipients of honor award citations in the radio 
classification were: WO WO Ft. Wayne, Ind., 
first honor award citation; WHO Des Moines, 
Iowa, second honor award citation; WHLM 
Bloomsburg, Pa., honor citation, and WMUB 
(FM) Oxford. Ohio, honor citation. 

Television stations that were cited were: 
WMAR-TV Baltimore, first honor award cita- 
tion: KTTS-TV Springfield. Mo., honor award; 
WFMY-TV Greensboro, N. C, honor award, 
and WHAM-TV Rochester, N. Y., honor award. 

Among the six honor awards in the daily 
newspaper category were the Twin City Sentinel 
(WSJS-AM-TV), Winston Salem, N. C.; and 
Memphis (Tenn.) Commercial Appeal (WMC, 
WMCF [FM], WMCT [TV]). 

Mr. Herd announced that presentation of 



MONTANA CALLS 
HOLLYWOOD GRAD 




ANTON (TONY) GAYHART, a recent 
graduate of Northwest Radio & Television 
School's new Hollywood Studio, has gone 
to work in film and announcing for 
KGVO-TV. Missoula, Montana. 

Broadcasters all over the country are 
finding that screened, professionally- 
trained graduates like Tony are saving 
them both money and time. Let us help 
you by referring qualified people to you 
with complete details, as they fit your 
specific need. 

There's no charge, of course, and we 
assure you of prompt, personal attention. 
Write or call collect, John Birrcl, North- 
west Radio & Television School, 1221 N. W. 
21st Ave., Portland 9, Oregon. We have 
schools in Hollywood, Chicago, Washing- 
ton, D. C, and Portland. 




GATHERED prior to the March 25 presentation of the Alfred I. duPont Awards in Wash- 
ington's Mayflower Hotel [B»T, March 28] are (I to r): O. W. Riegel, curator, Alfred I. 
duPont Awards Foundation, and professor of journalism, Washington & Lee U.; Merle 
Tucker, owner of KGAK Gallup, N. M., winner of the small station award; Victor Sholis, 
vice president-director WHAS-AM-TV Louisville, winner of large station award; Mrs. 
Alfred I. duPont; Eric Sevareid, winner of commentator award; Francis P. Gaines, presi- 
dent of Washington & Lee and chairman, board of judges. 



awards is usually made at a civic function in 
the recipient's community. A gold medal 
went to KANS for a campaign which included 
the preparation of original recorded safety 
jingles sent to all radio stations in the state 
and outside activities beyond the limits of 
Kansas. 

WBZ-TV merited the award, Mr. Herd said, 
for the production of an original film entitled 
Cry in the Night, which was concerned with 
the safety of portable heaters. The film was 
made available to outside organizations as a 
public service. 

Mpls.-St. Paul Awards Made 

U. S. Treasury awards for outstanding achieve- 
ment in promoting the sale of savings bonds 
have been presented to 1 1 radio and tv stations 
in Minneapolis-St. Paul. The stations were cited 
for conducting an intensive sale campaign dur- 
ing the second week in December, contributing 
to Minnesota's total for that month of S9.5 
million, the highest monthly total since 1945. 

The stations are: KEYD, KTIS, KUOM, 
WPBC, KSTP-AM-TV, WLOL, WCCO-AM, 
WCCO-TV, WTCN-AM-TV, WDGY and 
WMIN-TV. A personal award for leadership 
as chairman of the state radio-tv committee 
was presented to Larry Haeg, WCCO. 

Radio Writers Award Set Up 

FOLLOWING the announcement of the first 
tv writers award, to be given by Writers Guild 
of America West, Hollywood [B»T, March 21], 
the WGAW Radio Branch announced an award 
for radio writers. 

Winners, confined to WGAW membership 
at present, will be selected for best programs in 
four categories: dramatic anthology series, dra- 
matic episode series, situation comedy series 
and variety comedy or personality series. Nom- 
inations for eligible programs, from luly 1954 
to June 1955, will come from WGAW mem- 
bers, networks, independent stations and pack- 
agers. 

AWARD SHORTS 

Dave Showalter, director of public affairs, Co- 
lumbia Pacific Radio Network, was only mem- 



ber of radio industry to receive a "Job Well 
Done" award for 1954 from National Voca- 
tional Guidance Assn. 

George Putnam, KTTV (TV) Hollywood news 
commentator, tendered a special award for "out- ' 
standing work with California youth" by Cali- 
fornia State Juvenile Officers' Assn., marking 
first time group has "so sponsored anyone in 
public life." 

Dale Evans, co-star of NBC-AM-TV Roy 
Rogers Show received first Annual Achieve- 
ment Award of Radio-Tv Women of Southern 
California as "that woman in the radio-tv in- 
dustry who has most distinguished herself dur- 
ing the past year by her contributions beyond 
the normal demands of her professional ca- 
reer." 

WJAR-TV Providence. R. I., awarded a cer- 
tificate of appreciation from National Exchange 
Club of Toledo, Ohio, sponsors of National 
Crime Prevention Week, for on-the-air promo- 
tion in support of Crime Prevention Week. 

S. Olive Young, salesman, WAGA Atlanta, 
Ga., winner of Atlanta Sales Executives Club's 
Victor Award as "the most outstanding At- 
lanta salesman for 1954." Mr. Young, a four- 
year WAGA veteran, has led the radio sales 
staff in sales for those four years. 

Harris-Tuchman Productions, Hollywood, for 
third consecutive year received top award for 
tv commercials in the annual Arizona Adver- 
tising Awards, with the winning entry produced 
for Arizona Brewing Co., Phoenix. 

Lewis G. Cowan, producer* of Down You Go 
WABD (TV) New York, presented certificate 
of appreciation from American Cancer Society 
"for notable assistance in the crusade to con- 
quer cancer." 

Melvin L. Gold, president, Mel Gold Produc- 
tions, N. Y., presented with a plaque and the 
title of "Honorary Lifetime President" by the 
National Television Film Council. Mr. Gold 
was founder of NTFC in 1948; held the office 
of president for four terms, and was chairman 
of the board for two terms. In his honorary 
post, he will become a member of the execu- 
tive committee and e.x-officio member of the 
board of directors. 



Page 90 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



PROGRAMS AND PROMOTION 



'A Matter of Time' 

HEART research film titled A Matter of 
Time, released last December through 
Association Films Inc., New York, has 
been shown on 328 television stations to 
date, according to an announcement made 
last week by the Institute of Life Insur- 
ance, New York, which produced the 
film. A spokesman for the institute also 
said that the documentary, which deals 
with the progress medical science has 
made in its fight against heart disease, 
has been carried by the DuMont 
Television Network and ABC-TV and 
portions of it have been used on Omnibus, 
Sundays on CBS-TV. Prints of the 16mm 
15-minute film are available in color or 
black-and-white from Association Films, 
347 Madison Ave., New York 17. 



TWO POINTS OF VIEW 

PROMOTION PIECE pointing up the superi- 
ority of its sales reach over that of a rival news- 
paper has been put out by Los Angeles Times- 
owned KTTV (TV). The mailing duplicates 
an ad in which the Los Angeles Herald Express 
said a 210-line ad in its pages attracted 138,478 
readers, or 844 readers per dollar. By com- 
parison, KTTV noted, an advertiser buying 
KTTV's "Triple Pay Plan" gets a commercial 
on Mr. and Mrs. North, Boston Blackie, and 
Lone Wolf, thereby attracting 1,178,586 view- 
ers, or 1,236 viewers per dollar. "As a matter 
of fact," the promotion maintains, "any com- 
mercial you buy on KTTV on any day, will 
deliver an average of 1,185 viewers per dollar!" 

WLWC (TV) ENDS TALENT HUNT 

WLWC (TV) Columbus, Ohio, has completed 
an eight-week talent contest through five cen- 
tral Ohio counties. The station reports that this 
competition was the most extensive attempted 
in that area. The winner receives a five-day 
expense-paid vacation in New York and a paid 
in-person appearance on NBC's Tonight. 

WBSC CLAIMS 'FIRST' 

WBSC Bennettsville, S. C, has issued a 12-page 
brochure giving information about the central 
Carolina market and plugging its new Neil 
| Terrell & the News show. The station also re- 
ports it is airing what it believes to be the 
first all-Negro radio quiz show. 

SEARCH FOR A SALESMAN 

SALES Executives Club of Chicago is cooperat- 
ing with the local Tribune on a search to find 
"Chicago's Salesman of the Year," who will be 
announced April 24 and honored at a rally spon- 
sored by SECC at the Civic Opera House May 
4. Winning salesman and the nominating party 
each will receive a $250 cash prize, and 38 ad- 
ditional $25 prizes will be given to runners-up. 
The contest closes April 17 and entries will be 
judged by a jury to be appointed by the SECC. 

KRCA (TV) UPS NEWS COVERAGE 

INCREASED interest in news of the situation 
in the Far East has motivated KRCA (TV) 
Hollywood to augment its news coverage to 14 
telecasts per day. Total of 85 minutes of news 
per weekday reportedly gives KRCA more news 
programming than any other tv station in 
southern California. 

TIMES SQUARE 'SPECTACULAR' 

! SALESMEN at WRCA-AM-TV New York will 
see their names in lights starting today (Mon.). 
The following message will be spelled out in 
moving letters which operate on the sta- 
tions' "Spectacular" in Times Square: "Adver- 
tisers: You can sell more on WRCA and 
WRCA-TV. Phone salesmen George Stevens, 
Jay Heiten, Dan Sobel, Jim Barry, Bill Kreitner, 
Herman Maxwell, Carl Shutz at Circle 7-8300." 
; The station estimates that the message will be 
| carried once every six minutes and will be seen 
1 by approximately one million people every 
| week. 

I TONS OF MONEY 

TO POINT OUT how big the farm market is 
that KMA Shenandoah, Iowa, services, the sta- 
tion is sending to agencies and advertisers 
5Vi"x7" mailing pieces which put the figures 
in perspective. The farm market income totals 



$1,910,798,000, according to KMA, and the 
cards explain that the money represents 54,594 
tons of dimes, quarters or half dollars — enough 
silver coin to load 1,091 average size freight 
cars which would measure 8.3 miles in length. 
The station bases its deductions on the formula, 
as provided by a local banker, that it takes 
$17.50 in silver coin to equal one pound. The 
promotion piece suggests that the reader, by 
contacting the station or Edward Petry & Co., 
its representative, investigate "the market so 
rich it takes 1,091 freight cars to haul away 
the KMA farm income each year." 

CARTB PROMOTES STATIONS 

TO REACH more national and regional ad- 
vertisers throughout Canada, a series of two- 
minute messages about national selective radio 
is being sent to advertisers and agencies by the 
Canadian Association of Radio & Television 
Broadcasters. The folders, first of which was 
entitled "You Can Call the Shot" deal with the 
advantages of spot radio on Canadian stations. 
To keep the informational messages together, 
CARTB also mailed to advertisers and agencies 
a folder which shows on a map of Canada a list 
of the 126 member radio stations. CARTB 
also is distributing a booklet with the message 
that "Radio in Canada reaches more people, 
covers more homes, more often at less cost" 
and points out that there are more than 6 mil- 
lion radio sets in use in Canada's 3,886,000 
homes. 

WOR SALES SERIES 

ABOUT 200 advertising agency timebuyers, ac- 
count executives and media personnel in New 



York were invited by WOR there to attend 
a four-day series of breakfasts at Schrafft's 
Restaurant for a sales presentation on the sta- 
tion's personalities. The meetings, which were 
under the direction of Gordon Gray, vice presi- 
dent and general manager of WOR-AM-TV, 
and Bill Dix, WOR sales manager, were de- 
voted to a presentation pointing up the success 
of the recent John B. Gambling Madison 
Square Garden rally, [B«T, March 14, 7], at- 
tended by more than 25,000 fans, and the sales 
appeal of WOR's lineup of other personalities. 



THE BEST MUSIC IN AMERICA 



repertory 
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distinction 




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Transcribed 

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SESAC INC. 

475 Fifth Avenue 
New York 17, N.Y. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 91 





"Didn't Mom tell you she heard 
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dish-washer?" 



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Write for free catalogue. 



NATIONAL CINE LAB 




Washington 17, D. C. 



PROGRAMS & PROMOTION 




WKY-TV Oklahoma City personnel transferring to WSFA-TV Montgomery, Ala., whose 
purchase by WKY-TV ownership (Oklahoma Publishing Co.) has been approved by the 
FCC, prepare to take a "pledge of allegiance" to the Confederate flag. Hoyt 
Andres, seated, former assistant manager of WKY-TV, becomes manager of WSFA-TV. 
Standing (I to r): Scott Berner, chief photographer; Phillis Lewis, film department; Bob 
Tuttle, promotion and traffic manager; Bob Doty, program manager and assistant to 
Mr. Andres; Mack Rogers, news director, and Gene Jacobson, production manager. 



KFWB GETS AIRBORNE 

WITH permission already granted by the Civil 
Aeronautics Authority and cooperation pledged 
by law enforcement agencies, KFWB Holly- 
wood is awaiting FCC clearance before in- 
troducing regular aerial traffic bulletins into 
the station's programming. 

KFWB President Harry Maizlish announced 
that the station has acquired an airplane to fly 
over Los Angeles' crowded streets and freeway 
system during peak traffic hours to broadcast 
bulletins aimed at motorists. The bulletins 
would inform the motorists how best to avoid 
congested routes, as well as warning them away 
from the freeway system when accidents and 
breakdowns cause traffic jams. FCC approval 
is required of plane-to-ground broadcasts. 

TRIBUTE TO A COMMENTATOR 

FUNERAL services Thursday for Walter White, 
61, who died March 16, were broadcast by 
WLIB New York as a final tribute to the civil 
rights leader who had been a commentator on 
the station for the past three years. Mr. White, 
executive secretary of the National Assn. for 
the Advancement of Colored People, died in 
New York of a heart attack. Last October, he 
had twice entered the hospital for treatment. 
WLIB also devoted portions of all programs 
broadcast on Tuesday to tributes to Mr. White. 
Various aspects of his life were treated in six 
morning community news broadcasts. During 
the regularly-scheduled Walter White Show 
over the weekend (Sat., 5 p.m. EST), the station 
presented talks by close friends and associates 
of the late champion of the Negro's cause. 

KFOX GOES TO MOVIES 

SERIES of wide-screen motion picture trailers 
is used in seven local theatres by KFOX Long 
Beach, Calif., to reach an estimated audience 
of over 65,000 potential listeners a week. 

KELLOGG PREMIUM PROMOTION 

KELLOGG Co. of Battle Creek, Mich., has 
been distributing to grocers newly-designed 



cereal boxes with full-color portraits of Mary 
Hartline and Cliffy the Clown (from ABC-TV's 
Super Circus) and containing premium offers 
for Mary Hartline Magic Doll Kits. The pre- 
mium offer is being made in connection with 
the purchases of Kellogg's Sugar Smacks, ad- 
vertised on the network program each Sunday. 
Millions of the boxes have been prepared for 
sale by the cereal firm in recent months. 

CALL OF THE YUKON 

NEW crop of landowners developed among 
Southern California radio editors and columnists 
recently, when Quaker Oats Co., through KHJ 
Hollywood, distributed signed and notarized 
land deeds granting the writers full ownership 
of one square inch of the Canadian Yukon. 
Just "incidentally," the Mutual-Don Lee 
Broadcasting System station announced that the 
Sgt. Preston of the Yukon series can be heard 
each Tuesday and Thursday on the network. 



Now It's Easter Radios 

SPECIAL spot announcements were start- 
ed March 20 on WCUE Akron to launch 
a "give a radio for Easter" promotion 
designed by that station. Tim Elliot, pres- 
ident-general manager, has reported that 
all radio dealers in the Akron area were 
advised of the drive in the event that 
they wished to tie in with the promo- 
tion through broadcast and visual adver- 
tising and through special point-of-sale 
displays. 

Mr. Elliot pointed out that 98% of 
the homes in Summit county in which 
Akron is located are radio-equipped but 
that the trend toward a radio in every 
room is growing. The WCUE promotion 
is intended to stimulate the trend. He 
also announced plans for a portable ra- 
dio promotion which will get underway 
later in the spring. 



Page 92 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



FOR THE RECORD 



Station Authorizations, Applications 

(As Compiled by B • T) 

March 24 through March 30 

Includes data on new stations, changes in existing stations, ownership changes, hearing 
cases, rules & standards changes and routine roundup. 

Abbreviations: 



CP — construction permit. DA — directional an- 
tenna. ERP — effective radiated power. STL — 
studio-transmitter link, synch, amp. — synchro- 
nous amplifier, vhf — very high frequency, uhf — 
ultra high frequency, ant. — antenna, aur. — aural, 
vis. — visual, kw — kilowatts, w — watts, mc — 



megacycles. D — day. N — night. LS — local sun- 
set, mod. — modification, trans. — transmitter, 
unl. — unlimited hours, kc — kilocycles. SSA — 
special service authorization. STA — special tem- 
porary authorization. (FCC file and hearing 
docket numbers given in parentheses.) 



FCC Commercial Station Authorizations 
As of Feb. 28, 1955 * 





AM 


FM 


TV 


Licensed (all on air) 


2,687 


525 


130 


CPs on air 


5 


17 


t318 


CPs not on air 


101 


11 


130 


Total on air 


2,692 


542 


448 


Total authorized 


2,793 


553 


578 


Applications in hearing 


137 


2 


167 


New station requests 


186 


5 


17 


New station bids in hearing 


76 





151 


Facilities change requests 


146 


7 


36 


Total applications pending 


755 


67 


222 


Licenses deleted in Feb. 





3 





CPs deleted in Feb. 


1 





2 



* Does not include noncommercial educational 
fm and tv stations. 

t Authorized to operate commercially, but sta- 
tion may not yet be on air. 

# * * 

Am and Fm Summary through March 30 



Am 
Fm 



On 

Air 
2,705 
542 



Licensed 
2,696 
526 



CPs 
114 
30 



Appls. 
Pend- 
ing 

190 
7 



In 

Hear- 
ing 
76 




Television Station Grants and Applications 
Since April 14, 1952 
Grants since July 7 7, 7952: 







vhf 


uhf 


Total 


Commercial 




275 


319 


596 1 


Educational 




17 


18 


35 


Total 


Operating Stations in U. S.: 








vhf 


uhf 


Total 


Commercial on air 


308 


107 


415 


Noncommercial on air 


9 


3 


12 


Applications filed since April 


74, 7952: 




New Amend, vhf 


uhf 


Total 


Commercial 


958 337 


739 


537 


1.277 2 


Educational 


57 


29 


28 


57 3 


Total 


1,015 337 


768 


565 


1,334* 


1 One hundred-thirty-six 


CPs (26 


vhf, 110 


uhf) 



have been deleted. 
; One applicant did not specify channel. 
: Includes 35 already granted. 
1 Includes 629 already granted. 



ACTIONS OF FCC 
New Ty Stations . . . 

ACTIONS BY FCC 

Mobile, Ala.— WKRG-TV Inc. granted vhf ch. 
5 (76-82 mc); ERP 100 kw visual, 50 kw aural; 
antenna height above average terrain 520 ft., 
above ground 460 ft. Estimated construction cost 
$294,000, first year operating cost $212,298 revenue 
$232,118. Post office address 205 Government St., 
Mobile. Transmitter location Cottage Hill Rd., 
0.58 mi. West of intersection with Azalea Rd. 
Geographic coordinates 30° 39' 12" N. Lat., 88° 08' 
59" W. Long. Transmitter DuMont, antenna RCA. 
Legal counsel McKenna & Wilkenson, Washing- 
ton. Consulting engineer Commercial Radio 
Equipment Co., Washington. Principals include 
Pres. Kenneth R. Giddens (20%); Shirley Rester 
Konrad (10%); T. J. Rester (10%); Spring Hill 
College (6.6%); Alfred F. Delchamps (4.4%), real 
estate; and 15 other minority stockholders. 
Messrs. Giddens and Rester operate WKRG 
Mobile. Granted March 24. 

Yakima, Wash. — Robert S. McCaw d/b as Chi- 
nook Tv Co. granted uhf ch. 23 (524-530 mc) ; ERP 
21.9 kw visual, 11.7 kw aural; antenna height 
above average terrain 960 ft., above ground 150 
ft. Estimated construction cost $114,156, first year 
operating cost $120,000, revenue unknown. Post 
office address % Radio Station KYAK, P. O. Box 
172, Yakima. Studio location corner Fair & Mead 



Ave., Yakima. Ahtanum Ridge Rd., south of 
Yakima. Geographic coordinates 46" 31' 56" N. 
Lat., 120° 30' 30" W. Long. Transmitter and 
antenna RCA. Consulting engineer John Walker, 
Aberdeen, Wash. Mr. McCaw is pres.- y 3 owner 
KYAK Yakima; pres-Vs owner KALE-AM-FM 
Richland, Wash.; pres.- 1 ,^ owner KLAN Renton, 
Wash., and 10% owner Harbor Tv Corp., commu- 
nity tv system at Aberdeen, Wash. Granted 
March 30. 

Existing Tv Stations . . . 

ACTIONS BY FCC 

WTVT (TV) Tampa, Fla. — Tampa Tv Co. 

granted STA to operate commercially on ch. 13 
for the period ending Sept. 21. Granted March 
18; announced March 29. 

WILL-TV Urbana, 111— U. of 111. granted mod. 
of CP for reserved ch. 12 to change station loca- 
tion from Champaign to Urbana; change trans- 
mitter location to NW corner of U. of 111. Sta- 
dium, S. 1st St. at Florida Ave., Champaign; 
studio location to South Wright, Urbana; ERP to 
45.7 kw visual; 22.9 kw aural; antenna height 
above average terrain 160 ft. Granted March 22; 
announced March 29. 

WITN (TV) Washington, N. C— North Carolina 
Tv Inc. granted mod. of CP for ch. 7 to change 
studio location to U. S. Hwy. 17, 2.6 miles S of 
Washington and waiver of Sec. 3.613 of the rules. 
Granted March 22; announced March 29. 




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Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 o p age 93 



■FOR THE RECORD 1 



KTBC-TV Austin, Tex. — Texas Bcstg. Corp. 
granted CP to change ERP to 247 kw visual, and 
124 kw aural. Granted March 23; announced 
March 29. 

KTVE (TV) Longview, Tex. — East Texas Tv Co. 
granted mod .of CP for ch. 32 to change ERP to 
224 kw visual, 132 kw aural; antenna height above 
average terrain 290 ft. Granted March 23; an- 
nounced March 29. 

KANG-TV Waco, Tex.— Texas Bcstg. Corp. 
granted mod. of CP for ch. 34 to change ERP to 
18.6 kw visual, 10 kw aural; change description 
of studio and transmitter location to 4811 Bosque 
Blvd.; antenna height above average terrain 505 
ft. Granted March 22; announced March 29. 

STATIONS DELETED 

WFTL-TV Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.—Tri- County 
Bcstg. Co. FCC granted request to cancel CP 
and delete call letters for tv station on ch. 39. 
Deleted March 25. 

WIBG-TV Philadelphia, Pa.— Daily News Tv Co. 
FCC granted request to cancel CP and deleted 
call letters for tv station on ch. 23. Deleted 
March 25. 

KTVP (TV) Houston, Tex. — R. L. Wheelock, 
W. L. Pickens & R. H. Coffield d/b as Uhf Tv Co. 

FCC deleted tv station on ch. 23 for lack of 
prosecution. Deleted March 24. 

Dallas, Tex. — R. L. Wheelock, W. L. Pickens & 
H. H. Coffield d/b as Uhf Tv Co. FCC deleted 
tv station on ch. 23 for lack of prosecution. De- 
leted March 24. 

WTLB (TV) La Crosse, Wis.— La Crosse Tv 
Corp. FCC deleted tv station on ch. 38 for lack 
of prosecution. Deleted March 24. 

APPLICATIONS 

KHBC-TV Hilo, Hawaii— Hawaiian Bcstg. Sys- 
tem Ltd. seeks mod. of CP for ch. 9 to change 
ERP to 1.01 kw visual, 0.51 kw aural; antenna 
height above average terrain 293 ft. Filed March 
25. 

WABD (TV) New York, N. Y.— Allen B. Du- 
Mont Labs seeks mod. of CP for ch. 5 to change 



WE HAVE YOUR MAN 

EXECUTIVE & STAFF LEVELS 

CONFIDENTIAL CONTACT 

When a vacancy exists at manage- 
ment or staff level in your station it 
is of the utmost importance that the 
right man or woman be found . . . 
and fast. Delays are costly. 

There is no need to burden yourself 
and your secretary with reams of need- 
less correspondence and dozens of tele- 
phone contacts. This work has already 
been accomplished for YOU by our 
skilled personnel specialists, headed by 
Howard S. Frazier, the pioneer TV and 
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CURRENT AVAILABILITIES 
TV AND RADIO 

Continuity Editors 
Network Executives 
Station Managers 
Technical 

Supervisors 
Program Managers 
Production 
Managers 
TV Floor Personnel 
Announcer/Actors 
News Editors 
Sportscasters 
Film Buyers 
Continuity Writers 



General Managers 
Commercial 

Managers 
Chief Engineers 
Promotion 

Directors 
Producers/ 

Directors 
Special Events 

Director 
Announcers 
Technicians 
Newscasters 
TV Film Editors 



INQUIRE ABOUT OTHER 
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In most of the above categories we 
have clients qualified for both major and 
smaller market stations. Please write 
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ERP to 16.7 kw visual, 8.8 kw aural; antenna 
height above average terrain 1,329 ft. Filed 
March 25. 

KDUB-TV Lubbock, Tex. — Texas Telecasting 
Inc. seeks mod. of CP for ch. 13 to change ERP 
to 316 kw visual, 158 kw aural; antenna height 
above average terrain 823 ft. Filed March 28. 

CALL LETTERS ASSIGNED 

WAIQ (TV) Andalusia, Ala.— Alabama Educa- 
tional Tv Commission, reserved ch. 2. 

WBIQ (TV) Birmingham, Ala.— Alabama Edu- 
cational Tv Commission, reserved ch. 10. Changed 
from WEDB (TV). 

WTIQ (TV) Munford, Ala.— Alabama Educa- 
tional Tv Commission, reserved ch. 7. Changed 
from WEDM (TV). 

KLEW-TV Lewiston, Idaho— Lewiston Tv Co., 
ch. 3. 

KTBS-TV Shreveport, La. — KTBS Inc., ch. 3. 

KTVI (TV) St. Louis, Mo.— Signal Hill Tele- 
casting Corp., ch. 36. 

W I MA -TV Lima, Ohio — WLOK Inc., ch. 73. 
Changed from WLOK-TV. 

WKOK-TV Sunbury, Pa. — Sunbury Bcstg. Corp., 
ch. 38. 

WVAA (TV) Petersburg, Va.— Petersburg Tv 
Corp., ch. 8. Changed from WPRG (TV). 



New Am Stations . . . 



APPLICATIONS 

Bakersfield, Calif.— Morris Mindel, 1490 kc, 250 
kw unlimited. Post office address Booth 11, 2736 
Divisadero Ave., Fresno. Estimated construction 
cost $14,965, first year operating cost $36,000, 
revenue $45,000. Mr. Mindel is V 2 owner KGST 
Fresno. Filed March 21. 

Homer, La. — Claiborne Bcstg. Corp., 1320 kc, 1 
kw daytime. Post office address % W. M. Bigley, 
Magnolia, Ark. Estimated construction cost 
$16,500, first year operating cost $30,000, revenue 
$40,000. Principals include Pres. Frank Harkness 
Jr. (25%), auto agency salesman; Vice Pres. 
William M. Bigley (25%), general manager-12 1 / 2 % 
owner KVMA Magnolia, and sec.-treas.-V3 owner 
KRBB (TV) El Dorado, Ark.; Sec. Dr. Joe F. 
Rushton (25%), pres. -30% owner KVMA and 
pres.-i' 3 owner KRBB (TV); and Treas. L. L. 
Griggs (25%), cafe owner. Filed March 21. 

Robinson, 111. — Keith Moyer tr/as Ann Bcstg. 
Co., 1570 kc, 250 w daytime. Post office address 
1025 W. Market St., Taylorville, 111. Estimated 
construction cost $13,000, first year operating cost 
$30,000, revenue $40,000. Mr. Moyer is 9iy 2 % 
owner WBBA Pittsfield, HI. Filed March 25. 

White Castle, La. — Big League Bcstg. Co., 
1380 kc, 500 w daytime. Post office address % 
Elayn Hunt, 700 Reywood Bldg., Baton Rouge, 
La. Estimated construction cost $15,831, first 
year operating cost $14,000, revenue $22,500. Prin- 
cipals include Pres. William C. Lee Jr. (%), laun- 
dry, dry cleaning; Vice Pres. J. Edward Van 
Velkenburg (V 3 ), chief engineer WLCS Baton 
Rouge, La., and Sec. -Treas. Elayn Hunt (V3), 
attorney. Filed March 25. 

Lansing, Mich. — Booth Radio & Tv Stations 
Inc., 1390 kc, 500 w daytime. Post office address 
700 Buhl Building, Detroit. Estimated construc- 
tion cost $43,700, first year operating cost $110,000, 
revenue $120,000. Booth Radio & Tv owns 
WJLB-WBRI (FM) Detroit, WBBC Flint, WSGW 
Saginaw, and WIBM Jackson, all Michigan. 
Principals include Pres. John L. Booth (69.2%); 
Mrs. John L. Booth (13.9%); John L. Booth II 
(10.9%), and Ralph H. Booth II (5.8%). Filed 
March 22. 

Goldsboro, N. C— Wayne Bcstg. Co., 1300 kc, 
1 kw daytime. Post office address 116 W. Mul- 
berry St., Goldsboro. Estimated construction 
cost $16,385, first year operating cost $38,000, 
revenue $57,500. Principals include Pres. John L. 
Henderson (4%), insurance; Vice Pres. LaMont 
L. Edgerton (8%), farm equipment; Sec. -Treas. 
Lawrence B. Carr (52%), program director WMPH 
Smithfield, N. C, and Benjamin F. Carr (16%). 
Filed March 21. 

Coos Bay, Ore. — Harold C. Singleton tr/as Coos 
County Bcstrs., 950 kc, 1 kw daytime. Post office 
address 1011 SW 6th Ave., Portland. Ore. Esti- 
mated construction cost $16,700, first year oper- 
ating cost $32,000, revenue $36,000. Mr. Singleton 
is vice pres. -52% owner KTEL Walla Walla, 
Wash.; sec. -treas. -9. 9% owner KGAL Lebanon 
and owner KRTV Hillsboro, Ore. Filed March 18. 

Elizabethtown, Pa. — Will Groff tr/as Colonial 
Bcstg. Co., 1600 kc, 500 w daytime. Post office 
address 651 W. Market St., York, Pa. Estimated 
construction cost $18,746, first year operating cost 
$30,000, revenue $30,000. Mr. Groff is announcer- 
sales employe at WNOW-TV York. Filed March 
18. 

Milton, Pa.— John S. Booth, 1260 kc, 1 kw day- 
time. Post office address 220 Norland Ave.. 
Chambersburg, Pa. Estimated construction cost 
$12,050, first year operating cost $48,000, revenue 
$55,000. Mr. Booth is vice president-general 
manager- '/a owner WCHA-AM-FM Chambers- 
burg, and y 3 owner WTVE (TV) Elmira, N. Y. 
Filed March 17. 



Page 94 • April 4, 1955 



Savannah, Term. — Florence Bcstg. Co., 1010 kc, 
250 w daytime. Post office address % Joe T. Van 
Sandt, Box 137, Florence, Ala. Estimated con- 
struction cost $8,000, first year operating cost 
$30,000, revenue $36,000. Principals include Pres. 
Joe T. Van Sandt (63.3%); Vice Pres. Anthony J. 
Smith (33.3%), and Sec.-Treas. Velma L. van 
Sandt (3.3%). Florence Bcstg. owns WJOI-AM- 
FM Florence, Ala. Filed March 25. 

Rusk, Tex. — E. H. Whitehead, 1580 kc, 500 w 
daytime. Post office address Box 316, Rusk. 
Estimated construction cost $14,959, first year 
operating cost $25,200, revenue $36,000. Mr. Rusk 
is publisher of The Rusk Cherokeen (weekly) 
and The Citizen (monthly). Filed March 24. 

Tyler, Tex.— Louis Alford, Phillip D. Brady & 
Albert M. Smith d/b as Radio Bcstg. Service, 
1330 kc, 1 kw daytime. Post office address % 
Louis Alford, Box 604, McComb, Miss. Estimated 
construction cost $17,700, first year operating 
cost $30,000, revenue $40,000. Principals in equal 
partnership include Louis Alford, Phillip D. 
Brady and Albert M. Smith, all associated in 
ownership of WAPF McComb and WMDC Hazel- 
hurst, Miss. Filed March 21. 

APPLICATIONS AMENDED 

Elkhart, Ind. — Clarence C. Moore amends bid 
for new daytime am station on 910 kc, 500 w 
directional to specify 1050 kc. Filed March 28. 

Plymouth, Mass. — Sherwood J. Tarlow amends 
bid for new am station on 990 kc, 1 kw daytime 
to specify 1390 kc, 500 w. Filed March 23. 

Cleveland, Tenn. — R. B. Helms, Carl J. Hoskins 
& Jack Helms d/b as Southeastern Enterprises 
amends bid for new am station on 580 kc, 500 w 
daytime to specify 1570 kc, 1 kw. Filed March 23. 

Salem, Va.— R. B. Helms, Jack . Helms & Carl 
J. Hoskins d/b as Southeastern Enterprises 
amend bid for new daytime am station on 1360 
kc, 1 kw to specify 1480 kc. Filed March 25. 

Thermopolis, Wyo. — Mildred V. Ernst amends 
bid for new am station on 1240 kc, 250 w unlim- 
ited to specify 1490 kc. Filed March 25. 

Existing Am Stations . . . 

ACTIONS BY FCC 

KFJF Webster City, Iowa — Land O'Corn Bcstg. 
Co. granted permission to sign off at 6:30 p.m., 
CST, April through August. Granted March 22; 
announced March 29. 

WPLY Plymouth, Wis. — Eastern Bcstg. Co. 
granted permission to sign off at 6 p.m. April 
through September. Granted March 22; an- 
nounced March 29. 

Existing Fm Stations . . . 

ACTION BY FCC 

WUOT (FM) Knoxville, Tenn.— U. of Tenn. 

granted CP to change ERP to 79 kw; antenna 
height above average terrain 125 ft. Granted 
March 22; announced March 29. 

Ownership Changes . . . 

ACTIONS BY FCC 

WDEL-TV Wilmington, Del.— WDEL Inc. grant- 
ed transfer of control to Paul F. Harron through 
sale of all stock for $3.7 million. Mr. Harron is 
owner of WIBG-AM-FM Philadelphia. Granted 
March 23. 

WBOY Tarpon Springs, Fla.— WBOY Inc. grant- 
ed voluntary assignment of license to Freede- 
Miller Bcstg. Co. for $76,000. Principals include 
Pres. Hal. M. Freede (48%), organist; Treas. 
Justin McCarthy Miller Jr. (48%), commercial 
manager of WSPB Sarasota, Fla.; Sec. Beatrice 
A. Freede (2%), and Vice Pres. Margaret G. 
Miller (2%). Granted March 30. 

KJAY Topeka, Kan.— S. H. Patterson granted 
voluntary assignment of license to Robert Rohrs 
for $105,000. Mr. Rohrs is salesman for KOA 
Denver. Granted March 30. 

KOTV (TV) Tulsa, Okla.— KOTV Inc. granted 
relinquishment of positive control by John Hay 
Whitney through sale of 9.5% interest of J. H. 
Whitney & Co. to Walter N. Thayer, C. R. Peters- 
meyer and John K. Schemmer. Mr. Whitney will 
now own 44% interest. Granted March 30. 

WLBG Laurens, S. C. — WLBG Inc. granted vol- 
untary assignment of license to Scotland Bcstg. 
Co., for $21,393. Scotland Bcstg. is operator of 
WEWO-AM-FM Laurinburg, N. C. Principals in- 
clude Pres. Edwin Pate (26%); Vice Pres. Wade S. 
Dunbor (8.6%); Sec.-Treas. J. R. Dalrymple 
(13%), and six others each holding 8.9% interest. 
Granted March 30. 

WMAK Nashville, Tenn. — Volunteer State Bcstg. 
Co. granted voluntary transfer of control to How- 
ard D. Steere, Emil J. Popke Jr. and J. D. Berkey 
through sale of all stock for $16,500 plus assump- 
tion of liabilities. Principals include Howard D. 
Steere (75%); Vice Pres. Emil J. Popke Jr. (15%), 
and Sec. J. K. Berkey (10%), all associated in 
ownership of WKMI Kalamazoo, Mich. Granted 
March 30. 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



KCAR Clarksville, Tex.— B. B. Black, June 
Brewer, Mattie Lou Hurt, executrix of the estate 
of Reagan Hurt, deceased, d/b as Texo Bcstg. Co. 

granted voluntary assignment of CP to Robert 
(n) Wagner and Owen Cowan d/b as Texo Bcstg. 
Co. for $1,500. Principals include Robert Wagner, 
chief engineer, KFYN Bonham, Tex., and Owen 
Cowan, insurance and investments. Granted 
March 30. 

KYOK Houston, Tex. — KYOK Inc. granted vol- 
untary relinquishment of negative control by 
both Jules J. Paglin and Stanley W. Ray Jr. 
through sale of 14.3% interest to 4 station em- 
ployes. Principals will now include Jules J. 
Paglin (42.8 c r); Stanley Ray Jr. (42.8%); Edward 
J. Prendergast (6.4%); Frederick D. Schwarz 
(2 5%); Thomas A. Gresham (3.5%) and Ray K. 
Rhodes (1.7%): Granted March 30. 

KCNC Ft. Worth, Tex.— Blue Bonnet Bcstg. 
Corp. granted voluntary acquisition of positive 
control by J. H. Speck through purchase of 21 
shares from Elliot Wilkenson for $15,000. Mr. 
Speck will now own 51% interest. Granted 
March 21; announced March 29. 

WETZ New Martinsville, W. Va. — Magnolia 
Bcstg. Co. granted voluntary transfer of control 
from J. Patrick Beacom to Harry G. Bright 
through sale of 90% interest for $20,400. Mr. 
Bright is field representative for Sesac Inc. Mr. 
Beacom retains 10% interest. Granted March 30. 

WTAP (TV) Parkersburg, W. Va. — W. Va. En- 
terprises Inc. granted assignment of CP to The 
Zanesville Publishing Co. for $124,600. Zanesville 
Pub Co. owns 63% of WHIZ-AM-TV Zanesville, 
Ohio. Principals include Pres. Clay Littick 
(87 5%)- Vice Pres. Arthur S. Littick (3.3%), and 
Sec.-Treas. William O. Littick (9.2%). Granted 
March 30. 

APPLICATIONS 

KGPH Flagstaff, Ariz.— The Frontier Bcstg. Co. 

seeks voluntary assignment of license to Frontier 
Tv Co. No consideration involved. Filed March 
24. 

WTOR Torrington, Conn. — The Torrington 
Bcstg. Co. seeks voluntary transfer of control to 
Edmund W. Waller through purchase of 804 
shares for $6,030 from Harold Thomas. Mr. 
Waller is manager of the station. Filed March 23. 

WJCM Sebring, Fla.— Clearfield Bcstrs. Inc. 
seeks voluntary transfer of control to William 
K. Ulerich through purchase of 5 shares from 
Frank G. Smith for $750. Mr. Ulerich will now 
own 39.8% but obtains control through ability to 
elect 3 out of 4 directors. Control of WCPA 
Clearfield and WAKU Latrobe, both Pennsylva- 
nia, are also involved in sale. Filed March 23. 

WFTL Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.— Gore Pub. Co. 
seeks voluntary transfer of control to R. H. 
Gore Sr. (54.3%) through stock reorganization. 
R. H. Gore Co., parent company, will own the 
remaining 45.6% interest. Filed March 24. 

WRCD Dalton, Ga.— James Q. Honey & Ken- 
neth H. Flynt d/b as Whitfield Bcstg. Co. seek 
voluntary assignment of license to Whitfield 
Bcstg. Co. with recapitalization. Principals will 
now include James Q. Honey (50%), Kenneth 
E. Flynt (25%) and Edwin B. Jordan (25%). 
Filed March 21. 

WESM Pocomoke City, Md.— Walter F. Harris 
Jr. seeks involuntary assignment of CP to Ruth 
Ellen Harris (100%), executrix of the estate of 
Walter F. Harris Jr., deceased. Filed March 21. 

WJMJ Philadelphia, Pa.— Patrick J. Stanton 
seeks voluntary assignment of license to WJMJ 
Bcstg. Corp. Principals will now include Pres. 
Patrick J. Stanton (60%) and Vice Pres. James T. 
Duffy Jr. (40%). Mr. Duffy's interest is in lieu of 
loan of $20,000, Filed March 18. 

WCPA Clearfield, WAKU Latrobe, Pa.— Clear- 
field Bcstrs. Inc. seeks voluntary transfer of con- 
trol to William K. Ulerich through purchase of 5 
shares from Frank G. Smith for $750. Mr. Ulerich 
will now own 39.8% interest but obtains control 
through ability to elect 3 out of 4 directors. Con- 
trol of WJCM Sebring, Fla., is also involved in 
sale. Filed March 23. 

WCBR Memphis, Tenn — Chickasaw Bcstg. Co. 
seeks voluntary transfer of control to Jeffrey B. 
Crawford through sale of about 58% interest for 
assumption of $25,500 liabilities. Mr. Crawford is 
owner of Memphis Music Equipment Co., radio 
system. Filed March 21. 

WBTH Williamson, W. Va.— Williamson Bcstg. 
Corp. seeks voluntary transfer of control to Alice 
Shein through purchase of 48.7% interest for 
$18,900. Alice Shein wil now own 60.1% interest. 
Filed March 21. 

WLOH Princeton, W. Va. — Mountain Bcstg. 
Service seeks voluntary assignment of license to 
Robert L. Harrison d/b as Mountain Bcstg. Co. 
for $65,000. Mr. Harrison is 20% owner of KCRV 
Caruthersville, Mo. Filed March 21. 



Hearing Cases . . 

FINAL DECISION 

Mobile, Ala. — New tv, ch. 5. FCC announced its 
decision granting construction permit to WKRG- 
Tv Inc., for new tv station on ch. 5 in Mobile, 
Ala., and denying the competing application of 
The Mobile Television Corp. Commissioner Doer- 
fer dissented. Granted March 23. 



INITIAL DECISION 

Miami Beach, Fla.— New tv, ch. 10. FCC Hearing 

Examiner Herbert Sharfman issued initial deci- 
sion looking toward grant of the application of 
WKAT Inc.. for new tv station on ch. 10 in 
Miami Beach, Fla., and denial of the competing 
applications of L. B. Wilson Inc., North Dade 
Video Inc., and Public Service Television Inc., 
for the same channel in Miami. Action March 30. 

OTHER ACTIONS 

Elizabethtown, N. C. — FCC Hearing Examiner 
Basil P. Cooper granted petition of Cape Fear 
Bcstg. Co. for leave to amend am bid to specify 
1450 kc with 100 w instead of 250 w and removed 
amended applicaiton from hearing. Action March 
24; announced March 29. 

Emporium, Pa. — FCC Comr. E. M. Webster 
granted petition of Bucktail Bcstg. Corp. (WBTL) 
for dismissal without prejudice of its bid for re- 
instatement of CP for 980 kc, 500 w daytime. Ac- 
tion March 29. 

WSPA-TV Spartanburg, S. C— Spartanburg Ra- 
diocasting Co. Upon remand by U. S. Court of 
Appeals, the Commission designated for hearing 
on April 25 application for Mod. of CP (ch. 7) to 
locate transmitter on Paris Mountain with ERP 
of 200 kw visual and 120 kw aural, antenna height 
above average terrain 1182 ft., change main studio 
location within city, etc.; postponed effective 
date of April 20, 1954 grant to said application 
pending final determination after hearing; placed 
burden of proof on protestants Greenville Tele- 
vision Co. (WGVL (TV) ch. 23), Greenville, and 
Wilton E. Hall (WAIM-TV, ch. 40). Anderson. The 
designation order is subject to stay, withdrawal 
or other appropriate action in the event that 
the Court does not issue its mandate in these pro- 
test cases in the usual course. Action March 30. 

KLTV (TV) Tyler, Tex.— Lucille Ross Lansing. 
FCC by letter, dismissed, for lack of compli- 
ance with rules, request for STA to operate pri- 
vate tv intercity relay system (off-the-air pickup) 
between Tyler and Dallas. KLTV operates on 
ch. 7. Action March 30. 

Thermopolis, Wyo. — FCC Hearing Examiner 
William G. Butts granted petition of Mildred V. 
Ernst for leave to amend bid for new am sta- 
tion on 1490 kc to specify 1240 kc and remove 
amended application from hearing docket. Action 
March 21; announced March 24. 



Routine Roundup . . . 

March 24 Decisions 

ACTIONS ON MOTIONS 

By Hearing Examiner Herbert Sharfman 
on March 22 

Erie, Pa., Dispatch Inc. — Issued his Memoran- 
dum of Ruling announcing his denial of motion 
for decision by Dispatch Inc., at the oral argu- 
ment held March 16 and 17 in re renewal of li- 
cense of station WICU (TV) (Docket 11048), and 
noted exception for the applicant. 

By Hearing Examiner James D. Cunningham 
on March 22 

WERD Atlanta, Ga., Radio Atlanta Inc. — Grant- 
ed motion to strike, as irrelevant, several por- 
tions of proposed findings filed in behalf of 
Dorsey Eugene Newman, Hartselle, Ala., in re 
CP's for am facilities (Dockets 10638 et al.). 

By Hearing Examiner Annie Neal Huntting 
on March 22 

KGEO-TV Enid, Okla., Streets Electronics Die. 

— Ordered all parties, or their attorneys, to ap- 
pear at a prehearing conference on March 24 in 
proceeding re Docket 11302. 



Miners Bcstg. Service Inc., Ambridge, Pa.; 
Louis Rosenberg, Tarentum, Pa.; Somerset Bcstg. 
Co., Painesville, Ohio — Issued second statement 
concerning prehearing conference and order in 
re applications for am facilities (Dockets 11202 
et al.). 

By Hearing Examiner Hugh B. Hutchison 
on March 22 
Abilene, Tex., Bill Mathis — By Memorandum 
Opinion and Order granted petition for leave to 
amend his application for a new am station to 
increase the operating power from 500 watts to 
1 kw on 1280 kc (Docket 11180; BP-8917). 



March 24 Applications 

ACCEPTED FOR FILING 
Renewal of License 
KXJK Forrest City, Ark., Forrest City Bcstg. 
Co.— (BR-2273). 

KDLA DeRidder, La., Sabine Bcstg. Co.— (BR- 
2574). 

KANE New Iberia, La., New Iberia Bcstg. Co. 
— (BR-1343). 

KSLO Opelousas, La., KSLO Bcstg. Co.— (BR- 
1839). 

WFOR Hattiesburg, Miss., Forrest Bcstg. Co. — 
(BR-725). 

Renewal of License Returned 
KOSE Osceola, Ark., Osceola Bcstg. Corp.— (Re: 
signature). 

KSYL Alexandria, La., KSYL Inc.— (Re: Sec- 
tion II & signature). 

WSSO Starkville, Miss., The Starkville Bcstg. 
Co.— (Re: Section II date & Section IV). 

Remote Control 

WKBC North Wilkesboro, N. C, Wilkes Bcstg. 
Co.— BRC-685. 

Modification of CP 

KABC-TV Los Angeles, Calif., American Bcstg. - 
Paramount Theatres Inc.— Mod. of CP (BPCT- 
1424) as mod., which authorized changes in fa- 
cilities of existing tv station to extend comple- 
tion date (BMPCT-2976). 

KTVU (TV) Stockton, Calif., San Joaquin Tele- 
casters— Mod. of CP (BPCT-1465) as mod., which 
authorized a new tv station to extend completion 
date to 10-7-55 (BMPCT-2975). 

WFIE (TV) Evansville, Did., Premier Television 
Inc.— Mod. of CP (BPCT-1014) as mod., which 
authorized a new tv station to extend completion 
date to 10-1-55 (BMPCT-2977). 

WJTV (TV) Jackson, Miss., Mississippi Pub. 
Corp.— Mod. of CP (BPCT-719) as mod., which 
authorized a new tv station to extend completion 
date to 10-8-55 (BMPCT-2978). 

WNBF-TV Binghamton, N. Y., Clark Associates 
Inc.— Mod of CP (BPCT-770) as mod., which 
authorized changes in facilities of existing tv 
station to extend completion date to 10-8-55 
(BMPCT-2979). 

Modification of License 
WFIL-TV Philadelphia, Pa., Triangle Publica- 
tions Inc. (The Philadelphia Inquirer Division) — 

Mod. of License to change name to Triangle Pub. 
Inc. (Radio and Television Division) (BMLCT-28). 

KSL-TV Salt Lake City, Utah, Radio Service 
Corp. of Utah— Mod. of CP (BMPCT-835) as mod., 
which authorized changes in facilities of existing 
tv station to extend completion date to 7-8-55 
(BMPCT-2980). 

March 25 Decisions 

ACTIONS ON MOTIONS 
By Commissioner E. M. Webster on March 25 
Broadcast Bureau — Granted petition for an ex- 
tension of time to March 24 to file exceptions to 
the initial decision in ch. 5 tv proceeding at 
Bristol, Va.-Tenn. (Dockets 10879-80). 



ALLEN KANDEH 

cMjeqotiator 

FDR THE PURCHASE AND SALE 
□ F RADID AND TELEVISION 
STATIONS 

1701 K St., N. W. • Washington 6, D. C, NA. 8-3233 
Lincoln Building • New York 17, N. Y., MU. 7-4242 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 95 



FOR THE RECORD 



By Hearing Examiner Basil P. Cooper 
on March 24 

On Examiner's own motion, ordered that hear- 
ing re application of Bucktail Broadcasting Corp. 
(WBTL), Emporium, Pa., be continued from 
March 29 until 15 days after the Commission has 
acted on the petition of applicant to dismiss its 
application without prejudice (Docket 11217; BP- 
9306). 

Ordered further hearing on March 29 in ch. 9 
proceeding, Orlando, Fla., involving applica- 
tions of WORZ Inc. and Mid-Florida Television 
Corporation (Dockets 11081-83, BPCT-1153, 1801). 

By Hearing Examiner James D. Cunningham 
on March 23 

On Examiner's own motion, and with consent 
of all parties to the proceeding, ordered that the 
petition of Mid-Atlantic Bcstg. Co., filed Sept. 
16, 1954, to reopen the record for the acceptance 
of exhibits, be dismissed (Dockets 11045-46, BR- 
1724, BTC-1639). 

By Hearing Examiner Herbert Sharfman 
on March 24 

Pursuant to agreement of counsel for Dispatch 
Inc., Erie, Pa. (WICU [TV]) and the Broadcast 
Bureau, ordered that a further hearing be sched- 
uled for April 1, at 10:00 a.m. (Docket 11048, 
BRCT-42). 

By Hearing Examiner Elizabeth C. Smith 
on March 23 
New Orleans, La., The Times-Picayune Pub. 
Co. — Granted petition requesting certain speci- 
fied corrections be made to the transcript in 
ch. 4 tv proceding, New Orleans, La. (Dockets 
8936 et al.). 



March 25 Applications 

ACCEPTED FOR FILING 
Modification of CP 
WAEL Mayaguez, P. R., Mario Acosta — Mod. 
of CP (BP-8883) as mod., which authorized 
change frequency; increase power; change type 
transmitter and install DA-1 for extension of 
completion date (BMP-6802). 

Renewal of License 
KFSA Ft. Smith, Ark., Southwestern Radio & 
Television Co. — (BR-1503). 

KOSY Texarkana, Ark., Gateway Bcstg. Co.— 
(BR-2684). 

WAUG Augusta, Ga., Garden City Bcstg. Co. — 
(BR-2730). 

WSGC Elberton, Ga., Elberton Bcstg. Co.— 
(BR-1391). 

Renewal of License Returned 

WNAT Natchez, Miss., Old South Bcstg. Co. 
Modification of CP 

WIRK-TV West Palm Beach, Fla., WIRK-TV 
Inc.— Mod. of CP (BPCT-908) as mod. which 
authorized new tv station to extend completion 
date to 9-20-55 (BMPCT-2986). 

WJIM-TV Lansing, Mich., WJIM Inc.— Mod. of 
CP (BPCT-883) as mod. which authorized changes 
in facilities of existing tv station to change cor- 
porate name from WJIM Inc. to Gross Tele- 
casting Inc. (BMPCT-2973). 

Modification of License 

WJIM-TV Lansing, Mich., WJIM Inc.— Mod. of 
license to change corporate name from WJIM 
Inc. to Gross Telecasting Inc. (BMLCT-27). 

March 28 Applications 

ACCEPTED FOR FILING 
Renewal of License 
KAMD Camden, Ark., Camden Radio Inc. — 

(BR-1255). 

KWFC Hot Springs, Ark., Spa Bcstg. Co— 
(BR-1072). 

WARB Covington, La., A. R. Blossman Inc. — 
(BR-2887). 



Page 96 • April 4, 1955 



KMIB Monroe, La., Liner's Bcstg. Station Inc. — 

(BR-790). 

KBSF Springhill, La., Springhill Bcstg. Co.— 

(BR -2992). 

KTLD Tallulah, La., Howard E. Griffith— (BR- 

3000). 

KTIB Thibodaux, La., Delta Bcstrs. Inc.— (BR- 

2928). 

WBIP Booneville, Miss., Booneville Bcstg. Co. — 

(BR-2513). 

WLAU Laurel, Miss., Southland Bcstg. Co. — 

(BR-2021). 

Renewal of License Returned 

KJOE Shreveport, La., Audiocasting Inc. — 
(Dated wrong). 

WSKB McComb, Miss., WSKB Inc.— (Re: name 
of applicant). 

Application Returned 

WGRM Greenwood, Miss., P. K. Ewing — Volun- 
tary assignment of license to Mrs. P. K. Ewing 
and F. C. Ewing. 

Renewal of License 

KLCN-FM Blytheville, Ark., Harold L. Sudbury 
— (BRH-428). 

WATJG-FM Augusta, Ga., Chester H. Jones et 
al. d/b as Garden City Bcstg. Co. — (BRH-756). 
License for CP 

KGO-FM San Francisco, Calif., American 
Bsctg. -Paramount Theatres Inc. — License to cover 
CP (BPH-2007) which authorized changes in 
licensed station (BLH-1042). 

WXYZ-FM Detroit, Mich., WXYZ Inc.— License 
to cover CP (BPH-1981) which authorized 
changes in licensed station (BLH-1041). 

Renewal of License 

WERS (FM) Boston, Mass., Emerson College— 
(BRED-39). 

KACC-FM Abilene, Tex., Abilene Christian 
College, a Texas Corp.— (BRED-102). 

Modification of CP 

KBID-TV Fresno, Calif., John H. Poole tr/as 
John Poole Bcstg. Co.— Mod. of CP (BPCT-1069) 
as mod. which authorized a new tv station to ex- 
tend completion date to 10-12-55 (BMPCT-2983). 

WMBR-TV Jacksonville, Fla., The Washington 
Post Co.— Mod. of CP (BPCT-877) as mod. which 
authorized changes in facilities of existing tv 
station to extend completion date to 10-12-55 
(BMPCT-2981). 

WTLE (TV) Evanston, 111., Northwest Television 
Bcstg. Corp.— Mod. of CP (BPCT-1724) as mod. 
which authorized a new tv station to extend com- 
pletion date (BMPCT-2984). 

WAAB-TV Worcester, Mass., WAAB Inc. — 
Mod. of CP (BPCT-1241) as mod. which author- 
ized a new tv station to extend completion date 
to 10-12-55 (BMPCT-2982). 

WEOL-TV Elyria, Ohio, Elyria-Lorain Bcstg. 
Co.— Mod. of CP (BPCT-1134) as mod. which 
authorized new station to extend completion date 
to 10-11-55 (BMPCT-2989). 

License for CP 

WAAG Adel, Ga., Robert A. Davis., W. M. 
Forshee and W. T. Scott d/b as Cook County 
Bcstg. Co. — License to cover CP (BP-9459) which 
authorized new standard broadcast station (BL- 
5665). 

WBFC Fremont, Mich., Paul A. Brandt — License 
to cover CP (BP-9441) as mod. which authorized 
new standard broadcast station (BL-5664). 
Renewal of License 

WHXY Bogalusa, La., Bogalusa Bcstg. Co. — 
(BR-2921). 

WQBC Vicksburg, Miss., Delta Bcstg. Co.— 
(BR-721). 

Applications Returned 
KBBA Benton, Ark., Benton Bcstg. Service — 
Renewal of license (name wrong and dated 
wrong). 

WKLJ Sparta, Wis., Sparta-Tomah Bcstg. Co.— 

CP to change frequency from 990 kc to 1290 kilo- 
cycles; increase power from 250 w to 1 kw and 
install a new transmitter (to be notarized). 



Modification of CP 

KTRE-TV Modesto, Calif., KTRE Bcstg. Co.— 
Mod. of CP (BPCT-1721) as mod. which author- 
ized new tv station to extend completion date to 
10-17-55 (BMPCT-2996). 

KBOI-TV Boise, Idaho, Boise Valley Bcstrs. Inc. 
—Mod. of CP (BPCT-1489) as mod. which au- 
thorized new tv station to extend completion 
date to 6-13-55 (BMPCT-2993). 

WBKB (TV) Chicago, HI., American Bcstg.- 
Paramount Theatres Inc. — Mod. of CP (BPCT- 
1493) as mod. which authorized changes in facil- 
ities of existing tv station to extend completion 
date (BMPCT-2995). 

KVTV (TV) Sioux City, Iowa, Cowles Bcstg. Co. 
—Mod. of CP (BPCT-1851) as mod. which au- 
thorized changes in facilities of existing tv sta- 
tion to extend completion date to 6-25-55 
(BMPCT-3001). 

WPTV (TV) Ashland, Ky., Albert S. Polan, 
E. G. Polan, Lincoln M. Polan, Charles M. Polan 
and Lake Polan Jr. d/b as Polan Industries — 
Mod. of CP (BPCT-1009) as mod. which author- 
ized new tv station to extend completion date to 
10-13-55 (BMPCT-2992). 

WSPD-TV Toledo, Ohio, Storer Bcstg. Co.— 
Mod. of CP (BPCT-1538) as mod. which author- 
ized changes in facilities of existing tv station 
to extend completion date to 10-18-55 (BMPCT- 
2997). 

KGEO-TV Enid, Okla., Streets Electronics Inc. 

—Mod. of CP (BPCT-1421) as mod. which au- 
thorized new tv station to extend completion 
date to 9-30-55 (BMPCT-2991) . 

KRBC-TV Abilene, Tex., Abilene Radio and 
Television Co.— Mod. of CP (BPCT-1163) as mod., 
which authorized new tv station to extend com- 
pletion date to 7-15-55 (BMPCT-2994). 

WQED (TV) Pittsburgh, Pa., Metropolitan 
Pittsburgh Educational Television Station — Mod 
of CP (BPET-25) as mod. which authorized new 
educational tv station to extend completion date 
to 5-13-55 (BMPET-68). 



March 29 Decisions 

ACTIONS ON MOTIONS 

By Commissioner E. M. Webster on March 25 
WWBZ Vineland, N. J., Community Bcstg. 
Service Inc. — Granted in part, petition for exten- 
sion of time in which to file exceptions to initial 
decision in proceeding re Docket 10133, and the 
time was extended to and including April 8. 

By Hearing Examiner William G. Butts 
on March 25 

Thermopolis, Wyo., Thermopolis Bcstg. Co. — 

Continued hearing now scheduled for March 31 
to April 15 re (Docket 11127). 

By Hearing Examiner Annie Neal Huntting 
on March 25 
WSDR Sterling, 111., Blackhawk Bcstg. Co.— 

Issued a second statement concerning prehearing 
conference and order which shall govern the 
proceeding in re Docket 11146. 

By Hearing Examiner Elizabeth C. Smith 
on March 23 
Broadcast Bureau — Granted petition for an 
extension of time to March 25 in which to file 
proposed findings in re application of Tupelo 
Bcstg. Co. (WELO), Tupelo, Miss. (Docket 11002); 
and the time in which to file reply findings was 
extended to April 8. 

By Hearing Examiner J. D. Bond on March 25 

Issued fourth pretrial order which shall govern 
the course of the further proceeding to the extent 
indicated in re applications of The Toledo Blade 
Co., et al., for ch. 11 at Toledo, Ohio (Docket 
11084 et al.), and ordered hearing of evidence 
to commence on June 14. 

By Hearing Examiner Hugh B. Hutchison 
on March 25 
Cambridge, Md„ The Shore Bcstg. Co.— Pursu- 
ant to agreement by counsel, the hearing sched- 
uled for April 12 is changed to April 13, in re 
Docket 11144. 

BROADCAST ACTIONS 
By the Broadcast Bureau 
Actions of March 25 
Granted License 
WVAM Altoona, Pa., The General Bcstg. Corp. — 
Granted license covering change to directional 
antenna night use only (DA-N) (BL-5633). 

KVFC Cortez, Colo., Jack W. Hawkins and 
Barney H. Hubbs — Granted license for am broad- 
cast station (BL-5640). 

Modification of CP 
The following were granted extensions of com- 
pletion dates as shown: WIRK-TV West Palm 
Beach. Fla., to 9-20-55; WMBR-TV Jacksonville, 
Fla.. to 10-12-55; WAAB-TV Worcester, Mass., to 
10-12-55; WAEL Mayaguez, P. R., to 9-1-55, con- 
ditions; WTVN Columbus, Ohio, to 9-15-55, con- 

(Contimted on page 101) 
Broadcasting • Telecasting 



Radio Station and Newspaper 

Appraisals 

Tax, estate and many other personal problems create the need for an 
independent appraisal. Extensive experience and a national organiza- 
tion enable Blackburn-Hamilton Company to make accurate, authori- 
tative appraisals in minimum time. 

Appraisals • Negotiations • Financing 
BLACKBURN - HAMILTON COMPANY 

RADIO-TV-NEWSPAPER BROKERS 

WASHINGTON, D. C. CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO 

James W. Blackburn Ray V. Hamilton William T. Stubblefleld 

Clifford Marshall Phil Jackson 

Washington Bldg Tribune Tower 235 Montgomery St. 

Sterling 3-4341-2 Delaware 7-2755-6 Exbrook 2-5671-2 



PROFESSIONAL CARDS 



JANSKY & BAILEY INC. 

■) ecutivo Offices 

735 De Sales St., N. W. ME. 8-5411 
)ffices and Laboratories 

1339 Wisconsin Ave., N. W. 
Washington, D. C. ADams 4-2414 

Member AFCCE * 



lommercial Radio Equip. Co. 

Everett L. Dillard, Gen. Mgr. 
MTERNATIONAL BLDG. Dl. 7-1319 

WASHINGTON, 0. C. 
. O. BOX 7037 JACKSON 5302 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 

Member AFCCE* 



FRANK H. MclNTOSH 

CONSULTING RADIO ENGINEER 
1216 WYATT BLDG. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 
Metropolitan 8-4477 

Member AFCCE* 



KEAR & KENNEDY 

102 18th St., N. W. Hudson 3-9000 

WASHINGTON 6, D. C. 

Member AFCCE * 



j 

LYNNE C. SMEBY 

"Registered Professional Engineer" 
11 G St., N. W. EX 3-8073 

WASHINGTON 5, D. C. 



ROBERT L HAMMETT 

CONSULTING RADIO ENGINEER 

821 MARKET STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIFORNIA 
SUTTER 1.7545 



J. G. ROUNTREE, JR. 
4515 Prentice Street 
EMerson 3266 
Dallas 6, Texas 



JAMES C. McNARY 
Consulting Engineer 
National Press Bldg., Wash. 4, D. C. 
Telephone District 7-1205 

Member AFCCE * 



A. D. RING & ASSOCIATES 

30 Years' Experience in Radio 
Engineering 

Pennsylvania Bldg. Republic 7-2347 
WASHINGTON 4, D. C. 

Member AFCCE * 



RUSSELL 


P. MAY 


711 14th St., N. W. 


Sheraton Bldg. 


Washington 5, D. C. 


REpublic 7-3984 


Member 


AFCCE * 



A. EARL CULLUM, JR. 

CONSULTING RADIO ENGINEERS 
HIGHLAND PARK VILLAGE 
DALLAS 5, TEXAS 
JUSTIN 6108 

Member AFCCE • 



GEORGE P. ADAIR 

Consulting Radio Engineers 

Quarter Century^ Professional Experience 
Radio-Television- 
Elcctronics-Communications 
1610 Eye St., N. W., Wash. 6, D. C. 
Executive 3-1230 — Executive 3-5851 
(Nights-holidays, Lockwood 5-1819) 
Member AFCCE* 



JOHN B. HEFFELFINGER 

815 E. 83rd St. Hiland 7010 

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 



VIR N. JAMES 

SPECIALTY 
Directional Antenna Proofs 
Mountain and Plain Terrain 
3955 S. Broadway Sunset 9-9182 

Denver, Colorado 



— Established 1926 — 
PAUL GODLEY CO. 

Upper Montclair, N. J. MO. 3-3000 
Laboratories Great Notch, N. J. 

Member AFCCE* 



GAUTNEY & JONES 

CONSULTING RADIO ENGINEERS 
1052 Warner Bldg. National 8-7757 
Washington 4, D. C. 

Member AFCCE* 



WELDON & CARR 

Consulting 

Radio & Television 
Engineers 

Washington 6, D. C. Dallas, Texas 

1001 Conn. Ave. 4212 S. Buckner Blvd. 
Member AFCCE* 



GUY C. HUTCHESON 

P. O. Box 32 AR. 4-8721 

1100 W. Abram 
ARLINGTON, TEXAS 



WALTER F. KEAN 

AM-TV BROADCAST ALLOCATION 

FCC & FIELD ENGINEERING 
1 Riverside Road — Riverside 7-2153 
Riverside, III. 
(A Chicago suburb) 



Vandivere, 
Cohen & Wearn 

Consulting Electronic Engineers 
612 Evans Bldg. NA. 8-2698 

1420 New York Ave., N. W. 
Washington 5, D. C. 



LOWELL R. WRIGHT 

Aeronautical Consultant 

serving the radio & tv industry 
on aeronautical problems created 

by antenna towers 
Munsey Bldg., Wash. 4, D. C. 
District 7-2009 
(nights-holidays telephone 
Herndon, Va. 114) 



GEORGE C. DAVIS 

501-514 Munsey Bldg. STerling 3-0111 
Washington 4, D. C. 

Member AFCCE * 



Craven, Lohnes & Culver 

MUNSEY BUILDING DISTRICT 7-8215 
WASHINGTON 4, D. C. 

Member AFCCE * 



PAGE, CREUTZ, 
GARRISON & WALDSCHMITT 

CONSULTING ENGINEERS 

710 14th St., N. W. Executive 3-5670 
Washington 5, D. C. 

Member AFCCE* 



ROBERT M. SILLIMAN 

John A. Moffet — Associate 
1405 G St., N. W. 
Republic 7-6646 
Washington 5, D. C. 

Member AFCCE * 



WILLIAM E. BENNS, JR. 
Consulting Radio Engineer 

3738 Kanawha St., N. W., Wash., D. C. 
Phone EMerson 2-8071 
Box 2468, Birmingham, Ala. 
Phone 6-2924 

Member AFCCE * 



CARL E. SMITH 

CONSULTING RADIO ENGINEERS 
4900 Euclid Avenue 
Cleveland 3, Ohio 
HEnderson 2-3177 

Member AFCCE* 




Member AFCCE* 



SERVICE DIRECTORY 



'COMMERCIAL RADIO 
Monitoring company 

-BILE FREQUENCY MEASUREMENT 
SERVICE FOR FM & TV 

\gineer on duty all night every night 

JACKSON 5302 
&. Box 7037 Kansas City, Mo. 



CAPITOL RADIO 
ENGINEERING INSTITUTE 

Accredited Technical Institute Curricula 

3224 16th St., N.W., Wash. 10, D. C. 
Practical Broadcast, TV, Electronics en- 
gineering home study and residence 
courses. Write For Free Catalog, specify 
course. 



SPOT YOUR FIRM'S NAME HERE, 
To Be Seen by 75,956* Readers 
— among them, the decision-making 
station owners and managers, chief 
engineers and technicians— applicants 
for am, fm, tv and fascimile facilities. 
* 1953 ARB Projected Readership Survey 



TO ADVERTISE IN THE 

SERVICE DIRECTORY 

Contact 

BROADCASTING • TELECASTING 

1735 OESALES ST., N.W., WASH. 6, D. C 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 97 



RADIO 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 

Payable in advance. Checks and money orders only. 
Deadline: Undisplayed — Monday preceding publication date. Display — Tuesday 
preceding publication date. 

Situations Wanted 20c 1 per word — $2.00 minimum • Help Wanted 25tf per word — 
$2.00 minimum. 

All other classifications 30(i per word — $4.00 minimum • Display ads $15.00 per inch 
No charge for blind box number. Send box replies to 
Broadcasting • Telecasting, 1735 DeSales St. N. W., Washington 6, D. C. 

Applicants: If transcriptions or bulk packages submitted, $1.00 charge for mailing (Forward remittance 
separately, please). All transcriptions, photos, etc., sent to box numbers are sent at owner's risk. Broadcast- 
ing • Telecasting expressly repudiates any liability or responsibility for their custody or return. 



RADIO 



Help Wanted 



Managerial 



Commercial manager. Must know business and 
be a producer. Salary $85 plus over-ride on total 
station gross. Send complete details, photo and 
references. Box 782G, B-T. 



Radio sales manager wanted with lots of ideas 
for progressive midwest station. Wonderful op- 
portunity. Send complete details first letter. Box 
872G, B-T. 



Manager . . . new kilowatt daytimer K-BAM! 
Longview, Washington. Above average salary 
plus bonus. Only exceptional men from west or 
midwest considered. Resumes to Box 891G, B-T. 



Radio Station WOIC- needs a commercial man- 
ager with a desire to become part owner of a 
successful 1000 watt station without any invest- 
ment. Must be experienced; emphasis on sales 
and sales ideas. No floaters considered. This is 
not a swivel chair position. It will take a quali- 
fied aggressive salesman who is not afraid to 
work. Seldom is an opportunity of this kind 
offered. Contact F. A. Michalak, Radio Station 
WOIC, Columbia, South Carolina. 



Salesmen 



Florida — experienced man, draw against 15%. 
Box 661F. B-T. 



Excellent opportunity for good time salesman 
able to handle own copy. $75 a week salary plus 
5% commission. Send complete details, photo 
and references. Box 781G, B-T. 



Mature conscientious salesman! Assume list of 
excellent accounts, many on air. High commis- 
sion potential. Virginia. Box 880G, B-T. 



$100.00 weekly guarantee for experienced sales- 
man . . . salary and commission, advancement 
depending upon aggressiveness. Permanent em- 
ployment. Full details, Box 906G, B-T. 



Sales representative wanted, fully expanding 
staff; fully experienced, sound ideas, aggressive 
intelligent approach. Send background, refer-' 
ences and picture to Box 909G, B-T. 



Salesman — experienced salesman is wanted by 
CBS affiliate located in prosperous southwestern 
town of 25,000. Man must have proven sales rec- 
ord. Give complete details in first letter and 
necessary starting income. This is a permanent 
connection with good future for the right man. 
Box 928G, B-T. 



Going 5000 watts. Position open radio salesman, 
also radio salesman with first phone, and an- 
nouncer-engineer.. Experienced personnel only. 
Send photo, references. KCHJ, Delano, Cali- 
fornia. 



Sales opportunity for right man as sales man- 
ager or commercial manager for radio and tv. 
Contact Radio Station KSJB, Jamestown, North 
Dakota. 



Immediate opening for salesman in west Texas 
market. Some announcing preferred but not 
essential. Contact Tom Huksey, KTUE, Tulia, 
Texas. 



Experienced salesman needed to fill definite 
opening in sales staff at 5,000 watt NBC station 
in Eugene, Oregon. Competitive market, but 
good list of active one the air accounts to start. 
Send complete background and photo to KUGN. 
P.O. Box 112, Eugene, Oregon. 



Announcers 



Florida — pop DJ personality. Send tape and 
resume. Box 662F, B-T. 



Staff announcer for North Carolina daytimer. 
Good opportunity for an all-around man. Ex- 
perience not necessary if have ability. Box 
800G, B-T. 



Experienced, mature voice, announcer, disc jock- 
ey, Pa. kw daytime. Salary, talent, profit shar- 
ing. Send tape. Box 904G, B-T. 



Negro disc jockey, married, fine opportunity for 
advancement. Box 913G, B-T. 



RADIO 



Help Wanted— (Cont'd) 



Humorous DJ — Fast flowing ad lib. Jovial, full 
of fun, infectious personality. Production minded. 
Actor background. Single. For Pa., N. Y. ( Michi- 
gan, Ohio, Illinois area. Box 933G, B-T. 



5000 watt CBS affiliate has opening for staff an- 
nouncer. Strong on news, music and board opera- 
tion. Good opportunity to work into tv. Send 
disc, picture and salary required to Program Di- 
rector, KFBB-Radio, Great Falls, Montana. 



Immediate opening for good newsman who can 
handle farm and sports programs. KIRX, Kirks- 
ville, Missouri. 



Wanted, combo, 1st ticket, good engineer, strong 
on announcing. Excellent opportunity for good 
worker. Send tape, photograph, references to 
KTFS, Texarkana, Texas. 



Wanted — Experienced special events man for 
5000 watt station. Handle all remote broadcasts, 
gather and write local news, plus early morning 
announcing duties. Contact Greeley N. Hilton, 
Manager, WBUY, Lexington, N. C. 



WFRL, Freeport, Illinois, wants qualified staff 
announcer. One year experience minimum. Sal- 
ary offer based on present earnings. Contact 
Charles Harlan, WFRL. 



Good announcer, minimum one year's experience. 
Contact Bill Jaeger, WJWL, Georgetown, Dela- 
ware. 



Combination announcer — first phone engineer. 
Central Penna. University town. M. J. Berg- 
stein, WMAJ, State College, Pa. Phone Adams 
7-4959. 



Florida station has immediate opening for girl DJ 
with third class ticket. Must have pleasing voice, 
ability to run control board and have working 
knowledge of music. $50 for 40 hours to start. 
Send tape, photo and resume direct to Chick 
Catterton, WSBB, New Smyrna Beach, Florida. 



Wanted . . . all-around staff announcer and DJ. 
Must have 3rd class phone license. Contact Mr. 
H. G. Borwick, WVOS, Monticello, N. Y. 



Technical 



Combo man, 1st phone, permanent. Pleasant 
New England city. Daytime station. Send resume, 
photo, tape. Box 915G, B-T. 



Engineer or control operator, announcing limited, 
permanent position 5000 watt CBS. Send full 
particulars including photo, audition, salary de- 
sired, KSPR, Casper, Wyoming. 



Chief engineer. Must be experienced. Good sal- 
ary. Permanent position. Radio Station WMJM, 
Cordele, Ga. 



Wanted: Engineer, first phone, network station. 
WSYB, Rutland, Vermont. 



Chief engineer, am station, 250 watts, WWIN, 
Baltimore 1, Maryland. 



Programming, Promotion, Others 



Can you whip out imaginative copy? Pinch-hit 
on the air? Tend to commercial traffic with dis- 
patch and discretion? This is no job for day- 
dreamers or dawdlers. It is a top job with an 
eastern seaboard independent. Write completely 
please. Box 879G, B-T. 



Help wanted: Experienced program director and 
announcer for 5000 watter. Must be good morn- 
ing man. Box 930G, B-T. 



Need girl with ideas, to write selling copy. Per- 
manent job for right person. State salary ex- 
pected. Reply, John L. Cole, WHLF, South 
Boston, Virginia. 



Immediate opening for experienced copywriter 
both radio and tv accounts. Established CBS 
radio and vhf tv operation. Send experience, 
salary and references to Paul Clarkson, Conti- 
nuity, WTAD, WHQA-TV, Quincy, 111. 



News reporter — announcer. Must be able to 
gather and write local news, deliver authorita- 
tive newscasts and do some announcing. Salary 
$75.00 a week. Send experience, tape and sample 
news copy to WVSC, Somerset, Pennsylvania. 



Situations Wanted 



Managerial 



General manager ready to take complete charge 
of station. Sales, programming, etc. Midwest 
only. Daytimer preferred, will invest. Box 625G, 
B-T. 



Successful general manager — thoroughly experi- 
enced. 15 years all phases. Excellent references. 
Available soon. Box 820G, B-T. 



General manager, age 29, married, university 
graduate. 5 years experience from ground up. 
Held present managership 3 years. Hard worker. 
Want lifetime position. Willing to invest por- 
tion of salary in part ownership. Box 860G, B-T. 



Radio station manager available. Seven years ex- 
perience all phases. Family man, sober, civic 
minded. Excellent record, Prefer small town, 
but consider any. Could invest in small station. 
Write Box 869G, B-T. 



Aggressive, selling manager, ten years experi- 
ence, available. Operate economically. Interested 
south-midwest-southwest salary percentage basis. 
Travel for interview. Employer references. Box 
897G, B-T. 



Manager ... 25 years radio ... 2 years tele- 
vision . . . management or sales direction. Ref- 
erences. Now available. Box 899G, B-T. 



Sales manager — am — independent 500 w plus — 
north central or northwest. County population 
over 50.000. Salary plus commission — experi- 
enced. Box 903G, B-T. 



Announcers 



Announcer, deejay, available now. Go any- 
where, eager to please. Coached by top New 
York announcers, but no hot-shot. Looking for 
opportunity to prove myself an asset to your 
station. Sober, dependable. Tape and resume 
on request. Box 756G, B-T. 



Sports and newscaster, seeks more responsibility, 
wire service stringer. Employed met market. DJ, 
promotion, photography. Box 797G, B-T. 



Negro announcer and DJ, a smooth salesman, 
very good boardman. Box 813G, B-T. 



Announcer. First class license. Good voice. Ex- 
perienced. Box 863G, B-T. 



Superior experienced announcer available. Good 
salary, working conditions required. Family. 
Box 866G, B-T. 



Announcer: Radio or television, 2 years experi- | 
ence all phases radio, DJ, news, continuity, pro- 
motion, direction, 2 years college. Box 867G, B-T. 



Versatile: Strong on news, DJ and personality. 
Smooth pleasant delivery for women's commen- 
tary program. Family man. Trenton, N.Y., Phila. 
area. Box 868G, B-T. 



Veteran announcer, seven years experience. Defi- 
nitely no floater. Excellent references. Box 875G, 



Announcer, six years experience, DJ, news, staff, 
available immediately. Box 881G, B-T. 



Announcer: 3 years experience metropolitan 
market. Excellent voice. Married, vet, college 
grad. Seek permanent position medium market. 
Tape, photo, details on request. Box 883G, B-T. 



Staff announcer looking for sports minded sta- 
tion. Good sports background and worked all 
phases of radio. Not a drifter and is ambitious, | 
plus good recommendations. Box 884G, B-T. 



Talented, ambitious negro platter spinner. Out- 
standing show for programming, marketing, 
Selling voice. Revealing tape, history. Box 885G, 
B-T. 



Announcer — 24, married, vet, mature voice, 
strong on news and commercials. Resume, tape 
on request. Box 894G, B-T. 



Staff announcer. Strong on writing commercials. 
News, DJ, 3rd class ticket. Box 905G, B-T. 



Three years experience. Excel sports. Staff, 
sales. PD and tv agency background. Married, 
24, veteran. Box 907G, B-T. 



Announcer, stations staff, light experience. High 
potential, good news, smooth commercials, pleas- 
ing platters, seeking permanent connection. 
Travel, resume, tape. Box 908G, B-T. 



"Radioactive?" — This announcer's summer ob- 
jective in vacation relief. N.E. seaboard pre- 
ferred. Amply experienced. Instructing full-time 
basis N.Y.C. Mature, pleasant commercial de- 
livery. DJ performance easy articulate. Solid 
news, strong background classical music. Uni- 
versity degree, 29, veteran. Available about 
July 1st. Tape, resume upon request. Box 917G. , 



RADIO 



RADIO 



TELEVISION 



Situations Wanted — (Cont'd) 



First phone announcer — PD 5 years experience, 
age 31, single, desire early morning air shift — 
sales in afternoon. Will consider any and all 
offers and areas, but prefer east. Box 919G, B-T. 



Staff announcer, personality deejay, pop singer. 
Employed but looking for good future in good 
market. Will relocate. Single, 26, vet. Box 921G, 
B-T. 



Announcer, looking for opening with small sta- 
tion. Fully qualified in all phases. Recent radio 
school graduate. Travel, tape. Box 922G, B-T. 



Staff announcer, DJ, recent graduate, willing to 
work hard and learn. Tape, resume on request. 
Box 923G. B-T. 



Staff announcer — very pleasant voice, authori- 
tative news, strong commercials, unique DJ 
style, good knowledge sports, light experience, 
dependable, ambitious, immediate availability, 
tapes, resume. Box 924G, B-T. 



Staff announcer — married, friendly mature voice, 
all phases, light experience, ambitious, tape, 
resume. Box 925G, B-T. 



Personality disc jockey, strong commercials, 
news, easy to please, good disposition. Free to 
travel. Tape, resume on request. Box 926G, B-T. 



All-around staff announcer, strong on news, DJ, 
and commercials. Light experience. Looking for 
position in small station. Will travel. Sober, 
dependable, with good references. Tape, photo, 
resume on request. Write Box 927G, B-T. 



Announcer-DJ, tired Hollywood hassel, smog and 
phonies, willing to make financial sacrifice return 
east. 15 years experience. Now CBS staff. Box 
932G, B-T. 



Negro DJ, license. Tape, references. W. Betner, 
Jr., 107-28 139 Street, Jamaica. 



Colored disc jockey, good personality. Willing to 
work. Will travel. Former graduate Cambridge 
School Radio & Television. Good ideas. Consider 
all offers. Write, call Reg Dwyer, 933 St. Marks 
Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. Telephone: PR 8-5314. 



Announcer, copywriter, strong commercials, 
news. Dependable, will travel. James L. Moran, 
1061 Mayfair Road, Union, New Jersey. MUrdock 
8-4115. 



Midwestern graduate desires position as an- 
nouncer; experience, board, DJ, news, com- 
mercials. Single. Degree, vet. Tape, resume on 
request. Bill Parker c/o W. Piasecki, 2219 N. 
Parkside Ave., Chicago, 111. BE-7-6721, after 
6:00 p.m. 



Staff: Well versed all phases (will travel). 
Limited experience. Contact: Allen Richards, 
67-40 110th Street, Forest Hills, L. I., N. Y. Call: 
BO 8-2510. 



Conscientious announcer — DJ, news, sports. Ex- 
perienced Florida indie. Married. Held Navy 
sports publicity job. Prefer tv potential or 
progressive am. Northeast — Florida — Carolinas. 
Gordon Robbie, 619 East Camp Street, Lake City, 
Fla. Phone 135. 



Experienced combo, excellent references, mid- 
west preferred. Phone 90. Jack Teiken, Box 
404, Twin Valley, Minnesota. 



Experienced staff announcer. Authoritative news- 
casts. Relaxed commercial delivery. Korean 
veteran. Will travel. Mel Topper, 934 N. Harper 
Ave., L. A. 46. 



Technical 



Experienced am-tv. 2V2 years tv studio and 
transmitter. Am chief 5kw directional seven 
years. Family man. Box 817G, B-T. 



Engineer, first phone, ham license, experienced. 
Box 861G, B-T. 



Midwest only. Want vacation work at 5 to 50 
kilowatt station. Experienced studio and xmtter. 
First fone. Box 862G, B-T. 



1st phone, no experience — Navy vet. Grad radio 
& tv school — 31 — married — taking CIRE — 3rd tele- 
graph—can travel. Box 865G, B-T. 



Engineer: Experienced all phases, past chief, 
Ohio, Michigan. Box 876G, B-T. 



Tv engineer, experienced xmtr, studio micro- 
wave. 1st phone. Permanent only. Box 877G, 
B-T. 



Engineer: Licensed, fourteen years electronic ex- 
perience. Four years tv installation, mainte- 
nance and operation. Desires position New Eng- 
land, New York area. Box 878G, B-T. 



Chief engineer, 15 years experience. Results, no 
excuses. References. Box 900G. B-T. 



Situations Wanted — (Cont'd) 



First class radio-telephone engineer. Two years 
experience. Has done some announcing. Box 
931G, B-T. 



Position desired — first telephone — experienced. 
Also D. A. Delbert King, 6621 South First Avenue, 
Birmingham, Ala. Phone 59-9935. 



First phone engineer. 7V 2 years experience all 
phases broadcast work, including directional. 
Available immediately. C. A. Terry, R.F.D. No. 
1, Platte City, Missouri, c/o F. M. Miller. 



Production-Programming, Others 



Need creative copywriter? Send for one man's 
samples if you are a midwest station with TV, 
and away we'll go. Box 794G, B-T. 



Experienced cameraman — video, audio, floor man- 
ager, lighting, films, directing. Seeking per- 
manent, or summer position with production 
opportunity. References; will relocate. Box 
864G, B-T. 



Newsman . . . experienced in both radio and 
television writing, editing, beat pounding and 
presentation. Prefer tv or combined operation. 
Put me to work and stand back. Box 886G, B-T. 



News editor, specializing local news, seeks em- 
ployment major market. 14 years radio experi- 
ence, excellent references. Box 890G, B-T. 



Copywriter, experienced radio and agencies, 
wants to relocate in Florida. Can do air work, 
woman's shows. Box 901G, B-T. 



Sales, sales development, sales promotion man. 
Now delivering for syndicator. Would like to 
deliver for station. Box 918G, B-T. 



Program-production man, twenty years' experi- 
ence, desires affiliation with established station 
that still believes in radio and interested in sound 
programming. Family man. Presently employed. 
Address Box 934G, B-T. \ 



Professional organist-pianist (former radio an- 
nouncer — deejay) wants tv experience — staff po- 
sition. Veteran-single. L. A. Elliott, 710 Fill- 
more Place, Bay City, Michigan. 



Utility men. Pianist, organist, traffic, copy, pro- 
gramming. Victim of cutback. Southern loca- 
tion desired. References. Charlie Friar, 2600 Mc- 
Clintock Road, Apt. 4. Telephone: 2-6768. 



TELEVISION 



Help Wanted 



Managerial 



Commercial manager for vhf station in the 
southeast. Opportunity with established pioneer 
vhf station having major network. Excellent 
market. The man needed must be thoroughly 
experienced in local and national sales; able to 
lead and direct local sales staff. Prefer one who 
has knowledge of promotion and media adver- 
tising. Habits and character must be above re- 
proach. This is no position for loafers or play- 
boys, yet it is not a sweat shop. An honest day's 
work is all we expect. Our employees like our 
shop and fine working conditions. Very seldom 
does one leave us. This opening is unusual and 
offers excellent place for the right man. Write 
with detailed background about yourself, giving 
present income, experience, business and char- 
acter references, family status, health; club, 
church and civic activities if any. All replies 
"strictly" confidential. Enclose photograph with 
application. Box 850G, B-T. 



Regional sales manager for vhf station to travel 
midwest territory. Exceptional potential. Send 
complete details first letter. Box 373G, B-T. 



Salesman 



Illinois tv only operation has opening (2) for 
salesmen. Interested in young aggressive men 
with radio sales experience and anxious for tv 
transition. Compensation salary plus commis- 
sion. Write Box 847G, B-T. 



Technical 



Tv engineer wanted. Experience operating tv 
studio equipment. State experience and refer- 
ence. Box 824G, B-T. 



Immediate opening for experienced television 
studio transmitter engineer. Please give quali- 
fications and salary requirement. Call or wire 
Richard Cochran, Chief Engineer, WFAM-TV, 
Lafayette, Indiana. 



Situations Wanted 



Managerial 



Tv sales executive. High calibre, proven, aggres- 
sive leader. Seek position as sales manager or 
top-level salesman with leading metropolitan 
operation. Long, successful record as top man 
with present company. Thorough knowledge of 
entire tv business. Finest references and back- 
ground. Box 935G, B-T. 



Salesmen 



Five years radio sales and sales management 
experience. Desire tv sales opportunity in south- 
east. Box 882G, B-T. 



Technical 



Tv transmitter engineer desires to relocate. Two 
and one half years experience. High power vhf. 
not a drifter. Have very good reason for leaving 
present position. Box 888G, B-T. 

Radio, motion picture, photography, projection- 
ist experienced. Audio-radio-television gradu- 
ated. 1st phone. College — engineer major. Seeks 
television or radio position. Box 902G, B-T. 

Studio technician — cameraman. Graduate Tele- 
vision Workshop, New York. Have fine photog- 
raphy background. Veteran. Family man. Will 
relocate. Box 937G. B-T. 

Cameraman — technician: Graduate top New York 
school. Have fine administrative background, 
along with photography. Widely traveled. Vet- 
eran. Family man. Will relocate. Write Box 
938G, B-T. 



Production-Programming, Others 



Film editor presently employed in major north- 
east vhf, desires position as film director and 
buyer. Box 826G, B-T. 

Need someone with these qualifications? BA de- 
gree, production experience, special services 
officer, presently directing. Available immedi- 
ately. Details on request. Box 898G, B-T. 

Television farm director — fifteen years in farm 
and ranch radio and television production. Film 
and direct farm and rural programs. Newspaper 
— newsreel and press service experience. Desire 
station realizing value of rural programming. 
Continuous national sponsorship for over ten 
years proof of a job well done. Location no pref- 
erence Box 893G. B-T. 

I can be the hostess with mostest on your tv 
show! I can sing, dance, play piano and act, and 
I can cook too! With complete theatrical back- 
ground, now eyeing tv. Hope you'll saye "aye" 
after seeing pix, resume, etc. Please write Box 
911G, B-T. 

College graduate desires job in tv production, 
complete tv training, married, presently radio 
announcer, will accept most positions, job must 
have potential. Prefer midwest area. Alvan E. 
Murphy, 303 E. Broad well, Albion, Michigan. 
Phone: 6420. 



FOR SALE 



Stations 



Midwest. 1 kw. Independent. Earns $30,000 year. 
Priced right. Box 887G, B-T. 



For sale — Radio station upper midwest. Local 
outlet, network affiliate, excellent market, no tv. 
Ideal for manager-owner. No brokers please. 
Give financial responsibility in first letter. Write 
Box 889G, B-T. 



West Florida daytimer earning approximately 
$20,000 priced $65,000. half cash. Paul H. Chap- 
man, 84 Peachtree Street, Atlanta, Georgia. 



Radio station. 1000 watt. Daytime. Southern 
area. Market over 600,000 per owner. Priced un- 
der $60,000. Financially qualified principals write 
Ralph Erwin, Broker, Box 811, Tulsa. 



Free list of good radio and tv station buys now 
ready. Jack L. Stoll & Associates, -4958 Melrose, 
Los Angeles 29, California. 



Radio and television stations bought and sold. 
Theatre Exchange. Licensed Brokers. Portland 
22, Oregon. 



Equipment 



Two good used Stancil-Hoffman model M5A mini- 
tape recorders; will sell together or separately. 
Box 639G, B-T. 



RCA TF5A superturnstile. Tuned channel 5 but 
tunable 4 or 6. Box 772G, B-T. 



Complete Trans Lux news sign, excellent condi- 
tion, ideal promotion and advertising — $11,000.00. 
Terms and details on request. Box 871G, B-T. 



Fm 10 kw amplifier (less 1 kw driver). Also 
power supply. Western Electric type 506B-2. 
New. Reasonable. Box 895G, B-T. 



FOR SALE— (Cont'd) 

For sale: 3 Western Electric 9 A reproducers and 
arms — as a unit or separately. Any reasonable 
offer considered. Box 916G, B-T. 

Western Electric: Double jack panels $17.00: 110A 
limiter $60.00; 119C repeating coils $8.00; 111C re- 
peating coils $7.00. Box 920G, B»T. 

Gates transmitter control console type SA-97 
complete with power supply. Suitable for studio 
operation. Price $500.00. KGHF, Pueblo, Colorado. 

For sale: RCA 1 kw uhf transmitter, antenna, 
and accessories. Also, Federal transmitter, con- 
sole, antenna, monitor, and 220 foot non-insulated 
self supporting tower. Contact Lyle C. Motley, 
WBTM, Danville, Va. 

For sale: RCA BTF-3B 3kw fm broadcast trans- 
mitter. WHBL, Inc., Sheboygan, Wis. 

Complete uhf off-air pickup, video and audio 
output, 9.6 ft. parabolic dish, receiver monitor, 
F.I. meter, satisfactory use up to 40 miles — $1,- 
500.00. Address Henry Root, Chief Engineer, 
WLAM, Lewistown, Maine. 

Job recorder, Stromberg timeclock model 36, 
orig. $176.74. Excellent for use on announcers 
logs. Best offer takes it. Station WUST, Wash- 
ington 9, D. C. 

10 watt REL fm transmitter, excellent condition. 
40' tower, REL antenna, 100' of co-ax cable and 
guying cables. All for $800. City Schools, New 
Albany, Indiana. Attention Vernon McKown. 

RCA-lkw uhf transmitter, antenna, monitors 
and complete studio set up for channel 28 oper- 
ation. Full specifications and conditions of sale 
available. Write to: D. L. McNamara, Purchasing 
Agent, University of Southern California, Uni- 
versity Park, Los Angeles 7, California. 



INSTRUCTION 



TELEVISION 



Wanted to Buy 



Stations 



Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., will trade for radio prop- 
erty beautiful 10 unit, 10 bath apartment, \'z 
block from ocean. Box 752G, B-T. 

Wanted to buy radio station construction permit 
for small town. Prefer southeast. Box 870G. B-T. 

Want to lease good radio station in growing 
market. All replies strictly confidential. Box 
914G, B-T. 

Radio stations. Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, 
Arkansas. Ralph Erwin. Broker. Box 811, Tulsa. 



Equipment 



Wanted: Tv remote equipment including micro- 
wave relay. Box 791G, B«T. 

250 watt fm transmitters in good working order. 
Give fullest particulars and price asked. Box 
795G, B»T. 

Used 1 kw am transmitter. Prefer Gates BC-1F. 
Consider any at right price. Box 846G, B«T. 

Need 220-foot tower, kilowatt transmitter, other 
equipment for new station. Also WX-2 field in- 
tensity meter. Box 874G, B»T. 

5000 watt transmitter, used or new; full studio 
equipment. Box 912G. B-T. 

Wanted: Used, but in good condition GPL-Wat- 
son vari-focal lens, Model PA-861. KTVK, Phoe- 
nix, Arizona. 

Wanted to buy. An RCA BC-2B audio consolette 
in good condition. George B. Smith, WNDU-TV, 
Notre Dame. Indiana. 

Wanted — GR type 732-P1 range extension filter. 
State price and condition. WGL, Fort Wayne, 
Indiana. 



Wanted: Am frequency monitor. 
WTSB, Lumberton, N. C. 



Chief Engineer, 



Tv equipment needed — Lenses needed: 2 — 35mm; 
2 — 50mm; 2 — 90mm; 2 — 135mm. Also needed: 1 — 
DuMont portable sync generator; 5 — headsets; 
2 — connecting DuMont "A" cables with con- 
nectors. Forward information including price, 
condition, age and guarantee, if any, to North- 
west Radio and Television School, 1221 N. W. 21st 
Ave., Portland, Oregon. 

Complete am transmitter, console, and tower for 
1000 watt station. Advise any part you might 
have to sell. C. A. Kennedy, P. O. Box 71, Colum- 
bia, Tennessee. 

Want used, good condition, ready to go, short 
wave and broadcast transmitters, five to one 
hundred kilowatts. Must be priced right. Pay- 
ment dollars stateside. Airmail complete details 
to: Advertiser, 2 Eltisley Avenue, Cambridge, 
England. 

Used dual channel console, 1 DW, fm, transmitter. 
Radio Department, Ashland College, Ashland, 
Ohio. 



Get your FCC first phone license in 8 weeks. 
Intensive personalized instruction by correspond- 
ence or in residence. Free brochure. Grantham, 
Dept. 1-E, 6064 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Cali- 
fornia. 



Your FCC first phone license in a hurry. Nation's 
largest professional school offers brand new, 
streamlined course. Guaranteed coaching — na- 
tionwide placement. Full information rushed to 
you free (no salesmen will call). Get the best — 
it costs no more! Northwest Radio & Television 
School, 1221 N. W. 21st Avenue, Portland 9, 
Oregon. 



FCC 1st phone license in 5 to 6 weeks. Bill 
Ogden, 1150 W. Olive, Burbank, California. See 
display ad next week. 



RADIO 



Situations Wanted 



Managerial 



RADIO-TV SALESMANAGER 
OFFERS SECURITY* 

* Security, Mr. Prospective Employer, is 
the knowledge that this seasoned and re- 
sponsible man can manage your sales and 
allied departments in an efficient and 
profitable manner. 

New York and other major market ex- 
perience with key radio-tv stations of ma- 
jor network. Have been on the local and 
national operational sides as Account Ex- 
ecutive, in charge of Sales Development, 
Director of Advertising & Promotion and 
Sales Manager. 

Currently employed, married, age 38. 
Opportunity for growth is important. 
Resume, photo and top industry refer- 
ences are available on request. 

Box 910G, B»T 



PROMOTION MANAGER 



Promotion Manager, 5 years 
promo experience in top market 
AM-TV stations. Sales presenta- 
tions, publicity, merchandising, 
public relations. Graduate de- 
gree in advertising. References. 



* 

i Box 936G, B»T 

/ / 



Technical 



=&-e= 



=S-8= 



=8-3= 



TECHNICANS 

<^ Due to operational changes in staff, we tf> 
have four experienced technicians in TV 
and Radio — (one good film man) that we 
would like to help relocate. Complete 4 



details in confidence if you are interested. 

C. G. DeLaney 

WHEC 
40 Franklin St. 
Rochester, New York 



Help Wanted 



Managerial 



WE BELIEVE IN UHF 

MR. TV MANAGER DO YOU? 

We need immediately a capable, ex- 
perienced TV manager and TV sales 
manager to operate the affairs of a 
UHF station located in a large mid- 
western city. Must be willing to accept 
capital stock of the company substan- 
tially in lieu of financial reimburse- 
ment. Sufficient financial reimburse- 
ment will be made to cover living ex- 
penses. Give full details as to your 
qualifications, experience, family, pre- 
vious employment, and date available. 

Box 81 1G, B«T 



Salesmen 



TV SALESMAN WANTED 

KCRG-TV, Channel 9. Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa. Has excellent opportunity for ex- 
perienced salesman. Station owned by 
newspaper. Currently constructing 1,085 
foot tower. State's highest. New facilities. 
Including maximum power. Operative 
this spring giving station Iowa's greatest 
coverage. Cedar Rapids is fastest-growing 
city in Iowa. Position offers enterprising 
man bright future. Guarantee plus com- 
mission. Principal accounts would be 
regional. Wire, call, write Manager Pat 
Patterson. 4-4194. Full particulars. Ap- 
plications confidential. 



Program m ing-Production, Others 



THE FINDER 

Man to find people, places, things to stir 
imagination of young people. Daily TV 
program KETC (VHF-educational) St. 
Louis. Experience helpful, talent essen- 
tial. Must have own sense of humor. Pres- 
ent Finder leaving soon for CBS and net- 
work show after only six months. Send 
biog., pic, experience to Richard Hartzell, 
Producer, THE FINDER, KETC, ST. 
LOUIS, MO. 



FOR SALE 



Equipment 



TOWERS 

RADIO— TELEVISION 

Antennas — Coaxial Cable 

Tower Sales & Erecting Co. 
6100 N. E. Columbia Blvd., 
Portland 11, Oregon 



For Sale— (Cont'd) 



FOR THE RECORD 



Equipment 



FOR SALE— USED 

2 RCA 70C2 Turntables, complete with 
RCA & Gray arms and RCA & GE pick- 
ups; 1 RCA 86A1 Limiting Amplifier; 
Channel 4 RCA 19104C Sideband filter 
modified for 25 kw; Channel 4 RCA 5 kw 
Notch Diplexer; 1 RCA TT1A Television 
Microwave System including (Transmit- 
ter less wave meter, Transmitter control, 
Receiver and Receiver control); 1 RCA 
WM20; 1 Jones MM200 Micromatch; 1 
GE BM1A FM Monitor; 1 RCA BTF3B/C 
FM Transmitter. 

NEW 

1 RCA BC2B Audio Console. 

Contact 
J. L. Berryhill 
KRON-TV 
San Francisco, California 



OVER 100 
NEEDED 

That's what J. T. Snowden, Jr., 
Secretary-Treasurer of the North 
Carolina Association of Broad- 
casters, said when he ordered 
three ads in our Classified Sec- 
tion. 

In less than three weeks Mr. 
Snowden reported the response 
"Overwhelming". ... In fact . . . 
"We have been able to place 
dozens of good experienced 
broadcasters throughout the radio 
and television industry of North 
Carolina". 

Week after week, B»T has con- 
sistently produced top results 
for classified advertisers. 

So, whether it's personnel or 
equipment you need, let B*T 
help you solve your problems 
through a classified ad. 



(Continued from page 96) 
ditions; WTLE Evanston, 111., to 10-12-55; KBID- 
TV Fresno, Calif., to 10-12-55; KABC-TV Los 
Angeles, Calif., to 10-10-55; WFIE (TV) Evans- 
ville, Ind., to 10-1-55; KTVU Stockton, Calif., to 
10-7-55; WNBF-TV Binghamton, N. Y., to 10-8-55; 
WJTV Jackson, Miss., to 10-8-55; KSL-TV Salt 
Lake City, Utah, to 10-8-55. 

Actions of March 24 
Granted License 
WESO Southbridge, Mass., WESO Inc.— Granted 
license for am broadcast station (BL-5659). 

KXLY-TV Spokane, Wash., Northern Pacific 
Television Corp. — Granted license for tv broad- 
cast station (BLCT-142). 

Remote Control 
WKBC North Wilkesboro, N. C, Wilkes Bcstg. 
Co. — Granted authority to operate transmitter by 
remote control. 

Modification of CP 
KCAR Clarksville, Tex., Texo Bcstg. Co. — 

Granted Mod. of CP for extension of completion 
date to 8-12-55. 

Actions of March 22 
Los Angeles, Calif., Paramount Television Pro- 
ductions Inc. — Granted informal application for 
Mod. of Permit to transmit video transcriptions 
of the program "Wrestling from Hollywood" via 
air or rail express to Canadian Television Sta- 
tions, CBUT-TV Vancouver, British Columbia, 
CHSJ (TV) St. John, New Brunswick, CBWT 
(TV) Winnipeg, Manitoba, CBMT (TV) Montreal, 
CJCB-TV Sydney, Nova Scotia, CHCT-TV Cal- 
gary, Alberta, CFCM-TV Quebec City, Quebec, 
CBHT-TV Halifax, Nova Scotia, CFPL-TV Lon- 
don, Ontario, CBOT (TV) Ottawa, Ontario, CBLT 
(TV) Toronto, Ontario, and CKCO-TV Kitchener, 
Ontario, for broadcast by these stations in Can- 
ada, for the period ending Feb. 1, 1956. 

Granted License 
WCRS-FM Greenwood, S. C, Grenco Inc.— 

Granted license covering changes in fm station 
(BLH-1039). 

WHBF Rock Island, 111., Rock Island Bcstg. Co. 

— Granted license covering installation of a new 
transmitter and antenna, at main studio location, 
as an auxiliary transmitter and antenna (1270 kc, 
250 w) (BL-5653). 

WPRY Perry, Fla., Taylor County Bcstg. Co.— 
Granted license covering change of facilities 
(BL-5649). 

KOLR Sterling, Colo., High Plains Bcstg. Corp. 

— Granted license for am broadcast station (BL- 
5648). 

KYNT Yankton, S. D., Yankton Bcstg. Co. — 
Granted license for am broadcast station (BL- 
5647). 

WCKI Greer, S. C, Greer Radiocasting Co. — 

Granted license for am broadcast station (BL- 
5650). 

WALD Walterboro, S. C, Walterboro Bcstg. Co. 

— Granted license covering change of facilities, 
installation of new transmitter and changes in 
antenna system (increase in height) (BL-5652). 

WGST Atlanta, Ga., Board of Regents, U. of 
Georgia — Granted license covering installation of 
a new transmitter, as an alternate main trans- 
mitter, to operate on 920 kc, 1 kw night and 5 kw 
day (BL-5654). 

Modification of CP 

The following were granted extensions of com- 
pletion dates as shown: KSPG Tulsa, Okla., to 
10-4-55; KTVO Kirksville, Mo., to 8-1-55; KERO- 
TV Bakersfield, Calif., to 10-5-55; KPTV Portland, 
Oreg., to 10-4-55; WBRC-TV Birmingham, Ala., 
to 10-4-55; WKVM San Juan, P. R., to 6-25-55, 
conditions. 

Actions of March 21 
Modification of CP 

The following were granted extension of com- 
pletion dates as shown: WSLI-TV Jackson, Miss., 
to 9-22-55; WQXI-TV Atlanta, Ga., to 10-19-55; 
WJDM Panama City, Fla., to 9-21-55; KMYR 
Denver, Colo., to 10-12-55, conditions. 

ACTIONS ON MOTIONS 
By Commissioner E. M. Webster 
Broadcast Bureau — granted petition for an ex- 
tension of time to and including April 12, to file 
exceptions to the initial decision in ch. 12 tv 



proceeding, Richmond, Va. (Dockets 8945, 10805) 
(Action 3/28). 

By Hearing Examiner H. Gifford Irion 
on March 28 
Upon request of applicants in ch. 7 tv proceed- 
ing, Buffalo, N. Y. (Great Lakes Television Inc., 
et al) and without objection by Broadcast Bureau, 
ordered that the further hearing now scheduled 
for March 30 is continued to April 14. 

By Hearing Examiner Elizabeth C. Smith 
on March 28 

Granted joint motion of applicants in ch. 4 tv 
proceeding (Television City Inc., McKeesport, 
Pa., et al), for corrections in various respects to 
the transcript of evidence (Dockets 7287, et al). 

By Hearing Examiner H. B. Hutchison 
on March 28 

Issued Statement and Order concerning matters 
agreed to between the parties which shall govern 
the course of the hearing re application of Streets 
Electronics Inc. (KGEO-TV), Enid, Okla., for 
Mod. of CP (Docket 11302, BMPCT-2729). 

March 29 Applications 

ACCEPTED FOR FILING 
Renewal of License 
KXRJ Russellville, Ark., The Valley Bcstrs.— 

(BR-1508). 

WALB Albany, Ga., Herald Pub. Co.— (BR- 

1134). 

WDAR Savannah. Ga., WDAR Inc.— (BR-1318). 
KTRY Bastrop, La., Morehouse Bcstg. Co. — 
(BR-1900). 

KSIG Crowley, La., Acadia Bcstg. Co. — (BR- 
1553). 

KVOL Lafayette, La., Evangeline Bcstg. Co. — 
(BR-859). 

KANV Shreveport, La., Northwest Louisiana 
Bcstg. Corp.— (BR-2978). 

WLOX Biloxi, Miss., WLOX Bcstg. Co.— (BR- 

2033). 

WJMB Brookhaven, Miss., Brookhaven Bcstg. 
Co.— (BR-1995). 

WTOK Meridian, Miss., Southern Television 
Corp.— (BR-1521). 

Renewal of License Returned 

WRJW Picayune, Miss., Moseley Brothers. 
Modification of CP 

WVLN-FM Olney, 111., Olney Bcstg. Co.— Mod. 
of CP (BPH-1976) as mod. which replaced ex- 
pired permit for extension of completion date 
(BMPH-4988). 

KRCA (TV) Los Angeles, Calif., National Bcstg. 
Co.— Mod. of CP (BPCT-1462) as mod. which 
authorized changes in facilities of existing tv 
station to extend completion date to 6-18-55 
(BMPCT-3000). 

WMGT (TV) North Adams, Mass., Greylock 
Bcstg. Co.— Mod. of CP (BPCT-1259) as mod. 
which authorized new tv station to extend com- 
pletion date to 10-15-55 (BMPCT-2999). 

KOIN-TV Portland, Ore., Mount Hood Radio 
& Television Bcstg. Corp.— Mod. of CP (BPCT- 
1029) as mod. which authorized new tv station 
to extend completion date to 10-21-55 (BMPCT- 
2998). 

License for CP 

KWK-TV St. Louis, Mo., KWK Inc.— License to 
cover CP (BPCT-324) as mod. which authorized 
new tv station (BLCT-281). 

WSVA-TV Harrisonburg, Va., Shenandoah Val- 
ley Bcstg. Corp.— License to cover CP (BPCT- 
1324) as mod. which authorized new tv station 
(BLCT-284). 

March 30 Decisions 

BROADCAST ACTIONS 
By the Commission en banc 
Renewal of License 

The following stations were granted renewal of 
license on regular basis: WAJF Decatur, Ala.; 
WAYX Waycross, Ga.; WBGR Jesup, Ga.; WBHF 
Cartersville, Ga.; WBIA Augusta, Ga.; WGFS 
Covington, Ga.; WGLS Decatur, Ga.; WGRA 
Cairo, Ga.; WHBB Selma. Ala.; WIMO Winder, 
Ga.; WKAB Mobile, Ala.; WOWL Florence, Ala.; 
WPBB Jackson, Ala.; WPID Piedmont, Ala.; 
WTUS Tuskegee, Ala.; WZOB Fort Payne, Ala.; 
WHBO Tampa, Fla. 



BROADCASTING 



Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 101 



of all WHIO-TV 

mail came from areas outside Metropolitan 
Dayton. In fact, 13% of WHtO-TV mail carried 
"U:, o^i)^ • - - i > :-« primary «»««! 



CBS • DUMONT 



Page 102 



,4pW/ 4, J 955 



Broadcasting 



Teleca 



■FOR THE RECORD- 



Station 



TELESTATUS April 4, 1955 

Tv Stations on the Air With Market Set Counts 
And Reports of Grantees' Target Dates 

Editor's note: This directory is weekly status report of (1) stations that are operating as commercial 
and educational outlets and (2) grantees. Triangle (►) indicates stations now on air with reg- 
ular programming. Each is listed in the city where it is licensed. Stations, vhf or uhf, report re- 
spective set estimates of their coverage areas. Where estimates differ among stations in same city, 
separate figures are shown for each as claimed. Set estimates are from the station. Further queries 
about them should be directed to that source. Total U. S. sets in use is unduplicated B«T estimate. 
Stations not preceded by triangle (►) are grantees, not yet operating. 




ALABAMA 

Andalusiat — 
WAIQ (*2) 3/9/55-Unknown 

Birmingham — 

► WABT (13) NBC, ABC, DuM; Blair; 306,318 

► WBRC-TV (6) CBS, DuM; Katz; 318,000 
WJLN-TV (48) 12/10/52-Unknown 
WBIQ (HO) 10/13/54-Unknown 

Decaturt — 

► WMSL-TV (23) CBS, NBC; Walker; 26,230 

Dothantt — 

► WTVY (9) Young 

Mobile — 

► WALA-TV (10) ABC, CBS, NBC; Headley- 

Reed; 101,100 
WKAB-TV (48) See footnote (c) 
WKRG-TV Inc. (5) 3/23/55-Unknown 

Montgomery — 

► WCOV-TV (20) ABC, CBS, DuM; Raymer; 

61,259 

► WSFA-TV (12) NBC; Katz; 89,110 

Munfordt — 

► WTIQ (*7) 

Selmat — 
WSLA (8) 2/24/54-Unknown 



ARIZONA 

Mesa (Phoenix) — 

► KVAR (12) NBC, DuM; Raymer; 



118,560 



Phoenix — 

► KOOL-TV (10) ABC; Hollingbery; 118,560 

► KPHO-TV (5) CBS, DuM; Katz; 118.560 

► KTVK (3) ABC; Weed 

Tucson — 

► KOPO-TV (13) CBS, DuM; Hollingbery; 37,957 

► KVOA-TV (4) ABC, NBC; Raymer; 37,957 

Yumat — 

► KIVA (11) NBC, DuM; 



Grant; 26,136 



ARKANSAS 

El Doradot— 

KRBB (10) 2/24/54-Unknown 

Fort Smitht— 

► KFSA-TV (22) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Pear- 

son; 27.500 „ , 

KNAC-TV (5) Rambeau; 6/3/54-Unknown 

Jonesborot — 

KBTM-TV (8) 1/12/55-Unknown 

Little Rock— 

► KARK-TV (4) NBC, DuM; Petry; 95,581 
KTHV (11) Branham; 11/4/54-Unknown 

► KATV (7) (See Pine Bluff) 



Total stations on air in V. S. and possessions: 
427; total cities with stations on air: 282. Both 
totals include XEJ-TV Juarez and XETV (TV) 
Tijuana, Mexico, as well as educational outlets 
that are operating. Total sets in use, 36,029,308. 
♦ Indicates educational stations, 
t Cities NOT interconnected. 

(a) Two Buffalo, N. Y., tv stations, in addition to 
their U. S. set counts, report the following set 
coverage in Canada: WBEN-TV, 459,256; WGR- 
TV, 419,577. 

(b) Number of sets not currently reported by 
WHAS-TV Louisville, Ky. Last report was 205- 
544 on July 10, 1952. 

(c) The foUowing stations have suspended regular 
operations but have not turned in CP's: WKAB- 
TV Mobile, Ala.; KBID-TV Fresno, Calif.; WRAY- 
TV Princeton, Ind.; WKLO-TV Louisville, Ky.; 
WLAM-TV Lewiston, Me.; WPMT (TV) Portland, 
Me • WFTV (TV) Duluth, Minn.; WCOC-TV 
Meridian, Miss.; KACY (TV) Festus, Mo.; KOPR- 
TV Butte, Mont.; WFPG-TV Atlantic City, N. J.; 
WRTV (TV) Asbury Park, N. J.; WTRI (TV) 
Albany, N. Y.; WTVE (TV) Elmira, N. Y.; WQMC 
(TV) Charlotte, N. C; WIFE (TV) Dayton, Ohio; 
KMPT (TV) Oklahoma City; KCEB (TV) Tulsa, 
Okla.; WLBR-TV Lebanon, Pa.; WKST-TV New 
Castle, Pa.; WKJF-TV Pittsburgh, Pa.; KNUZ-TV 
Houston, Tex.; KETX (TV) Tyler, Tex.; WBTM- 
TV Danville, Va.; WTOV-TV Norfolk, Va.; 
WKNA-TV Charleston, W. Va.; WJPB-TV Fair- 
mont, W. Va.; WCAN-TV Milwaukee. 

(d) Shreveport Tv Co. has received initial deci- 
sion favoring it for ch. 12, which is currently 
operated by Interim Tv Corp. [KSLA (TV)]. 



New Tv Station 

The following tv station is the newest 
to start regular programming: 

WPRO-TV Providence, R. I. (ch. 12), 
March 27. 



Pine Blufft— 

► KATV (7) ABC, CBS; Avery-Knodel; 91,389 
Texarkana — 

► KCMC-TV (6) See Texarkana, Tex. 

CALIFORNIA 

Bakersfield— 

► KBAK-TV (29) ABC, DuM; Weed; 87,000 

► KERO-TV (10) CBS, NBC; Hollingbery; 146,398 

Berkeley (San Francisco) — 

► KQED (*9) 
Chico— 

► KHSL-TV (12) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Avery- 

Knodel; 60,801 

Coronat — 
KCOA (52), 9/16/53-Unknown 

Eurekat — 

► KIEM-TV (3) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Hoag- 

Blair, Blair Tv; 19,500 

Fresno — 

KBID-TV (53) See footnote. (c) 

► KJEO (47) ABC, CBS, DuM; Branham; 156,035 

► KMJ-TV (24) CBS, NBC; Raymer; 142.000 
KARM. The George Harm Station (12) Boiling; 

Initial Decision 8/31/54 

Los Angeles — 

► KABC-TV (7) ABC; Petry; 2,058,196 
KBIC-TV (22) 2/10/52-Unknown 

► KCOP (13) Weed; 2,058,196 

► KHJ-TV (9) DuM; H-R; 2,058,196 

► KNXT (2) CBS; CBS Spot Sis.; 2,058,196 

► KRCA (4) NBC; NBC Spot Sis.; 2,058,196 

► KTLA (5) Raymer; 2,058,196 

► KTTV (11) Blair; 2,058,196 

Modestot — 

KTRB-TV (14) 2/17/54-Unknown 
Sacramento — 

KBIE-TV (46) 6/26/53-Unknown 

► KCCC-TV (40) ABC, CBS, NBC; Weed; 127,500 
KCRA Inc. (3) Initial Decision 6/3/51 

► KBET-TV (10) CBS, ABC; H-R 

Salinast — 

► KSBW-TV (8) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Holling- 

bery; 492,371 

San Diego — 

*► KFMB-TV (8) ABC, CBS; Petry; 290,000 

► KFSD-.TV (10) NBC; Katz; 285,533 
KUSH (21) 12/23/53-Unknown 

San Francisco — 

KBAY-TV (20) 3/11/53-Unknown (granted STA 
Sept. 15) 

► KGO-TV (7) ABC; Petry; 1,068,555 

► KPIX (5) CBS; Katz; 1,068,555 

► KEON-TV (4) NBC; Free & Peters; 1,068,555 

► KSAN-TV (32) Stars National; 210,000 

San Josef — 

KQXI (11) 4/15/54-Unknown 
San Luis Obispot — 

► KVEC-TV (6) ABC, CBS, DuM; Grant; 82,836 
Santa Barbara — 

>■ KEYT (3) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Hollingbery; 
464,192 

Stocktont — 

► KOVR (13) DuM; Blair; 1,054,000 

► KTVU (36) NBC; Hollingbery; 120,000 



Directory information is in following order: call 
letters, channel, network affiliation, national rep- 
resentative; market set count for operating sta- 
tions; date of grant and commencement target 
date for grantees. 



Dallas 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



TELEVISION 
MARKET 



MAXIMUM 
POWER 

100,000 Watts Video 
50,000 Watts Audio 

DALLAS and 
FORT WORTH 

More than a Million 
urban population in the 
50-mile area 

More than TWO MILLION 
in the 100-mile area . . . 

NOW 



I 456,000 I 



TELEVISION HOMES 

in KRLD-TV'S 

EFFECTIVE COVERAGE 
AREA 

EXCLUSIVE CBS 
TELEVISION OUTLET FOR 
DALLAS-FORT WORTH 
AREAS 

^ — This Is why — . 

^KRLD-TV) 

is your best buy 

M 

Channel^*? f RoprKSbnlctt by 

The BRANHAM Company 



April 4, 1955 • Page 103 



FOR THE RECORD 



Tulare (Fresno) — 

► KVVG (27) DuM; Forjoe; 150.C00 

Visaliat — 

KAKI (43) 10/6/54-Unknown 



COLORADO 

Colorado Springs — 

► KKTV (11) ABC, CBS, DuM; Hollingberv; 

53,604 

► KRDO-TV (13) NBC; McGillvra; 40,000 
Denver — 

► KBTV (9) ABC; Free & Peters; 273,069 

► KFEL-TV (2) DuM; Hoag-Blair, Blair Tv; 

273,069 

► KLZ-TV (7) CBS; Katz; 273,069 

► KOA-TV (4) NBC; Petrv; 273,069 
KRMA-TV (*6) 7/1/53-Unknown 

Grand Junctiont — 

► KFXJ-TV (5) NBC, CBS, DuM; Holman; 9.600 
Pueblo — 

► KCSJ-TV (5) NBC; Avery-Knodel; 50,906 

CONNECTICUT 

Bridgeport — 

WCBE (*71) 1/29/53-Unknown 

► WICC-TV (43) ABC, DuM; Young; 72,340 

Hartford — 

WCHF (*24) 1/29/53-Unknown 

► WGTH-TV (18) ABC, DuM; H-R; 291,299 

New Britain — 

► WKNB-TV (30) CBS; Boiling; 284,169 
New Haven — 

WELI-TV (59) H-R; 6/24/53-Unknown 

► WKHC-TV (8) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Katz: 

934,448 

New Londonf — 

WNLC-TV (26) 12/31/52-Unknown 

Norwicht — 

WCNE (*63) 1/29/53-Unknown 

Stamfordt — 

WSTF (27) 5/27/53-Unknown 
Waterbury — 

► WATR-TV (53) ABC; Stuart; 193,320 

DELAWARE 

Wilmington — 

► WDEL-TV (12) NBC, DuM; Meeker; 2,051,000 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Washington — 

► WMAL-TV (7) ABC; Katz; 600,000 
WOOK-TV (50) 2/24/54-Unknown 

► WRC-TV (4) NBC; NBC Spot Sis.; 707,000 

► WTOP-TV (9) CBS; CBS Spot Sis.; 672,200 

► WTTG (5) DuM; H-R; 642,000 
WETV (20) 10/21/54-Unknown 

FLORIDA 

Clearwatert — 

WPGT (32) 12/2/53-Unknown 

Daytona Beacht — 

WMFJ-TV (2) McGillvra; 7/8/54-7/1/55- 
Fort Lauderdale — 

► WITV (17) ABC, DuM; Boiling; 145,600 (also 

Miami) 

Fort Myerst — 

► WINK-TV (11) ABC, CBS; McGillvra; 11,726 
Jacksonville — 

► WJHP-TV (36) ABC, NBC, DuM; Perry; 75,600 

► WMBR-TV (4) ABC, CBS, DuM; CBS Spot Sis.; 

405,600 

WOBS-TV (30) Stars National; 8/12/53-Spring 
*55 

Miami — 

► WGBS-TV (23) NBC; Katz 
WMFL (33) 12/9/53-Unknown 
WTHS-TV (*2) 11/12/53-Unknown 

► WTVJ (4) CBS: Free & Peters; 307.6C0 
Biscavne Tv Corp. (7) Initial Decision 1/17/55 

► WITV (17) See Fort Lauderdale 

Orlando — 

► WDBO-TV (6) CBS, ABC. NBC, DuM; Blair: 

80,000 

Panama Cityt — 

► WJDM (7) ABC, NBC, DuM; Hollingbery; 

24,750 

Pensacolat — 

► WEAR-TV ABC, CBS, DuM; Hollingbery: 

89,500 

► WPFA (15) 32,500 

St. Petersburg — 

► WSUN-TV (38) ABC, CBS, DuM: Weed; 134,000- 
Tarn pat — 

► WFLA-TV (8) NBC; Blair; 175,000 

WTVT (13) CBS: Avery-Knodel; 9/2/54-4/1/55 
(granted STA March 18) 

West Palm Beach — 

► WEAT-TV (12) ABC; Walker; 231,000 

► WIRK-TV (21) DuM; W-ed; 42,708 

► WJNO-TV (5) NBC. CBS, DuM; Venard; 231,000 

Page 104 • April 4, 1955 



GEORGIA 

Albanyt — 

► WALB-TV (10) ABC, NBC. DuM; Burn-Smith; 

45,000 

Atlanta — 

► WAGA-TV (5) CBS, DuM; Katz; 456,190 

► WLWA (11) ABC. DuM; Crosley Sis.; 465,000 

► WOXI-TV (36) 23,742 

► WSB-TV (2) NBC; Petry; 484,725 

Augusta — 

► WJBF (6) ABC, NBC. DuM; Hollingbery; 

133.000 

► WRDW-TV (12) CBS: Headley-Rsed; 131,444 
Columbus — 

► WDAK-TV (28) ABC, NBC, DuM; Headley- 

Reed: 84.690 

► WRBL-TV (4) CBS; Hollingbery; 95,412 

Macon — 

► WMAZ-TV (13) ABC, CBS, DuM; Avery- 

KnodeJ; 94.623 

► WNEX-TV (47) NBC; Branham; 62,032 

Romet — 

► WROM-TV (9) McGillvra; 150,990 
Savannah — 

► WTOC-TV (11) ABC. CBS, NBC, DuM; Avery- 

Knodel: 60.107 
WSAV-TV (3) 1/26/55-Unknown 

Thomasvillet — 

WCTV (6) Stars National; 12/23/53-Spring '55 

IDAHO 

Boiset — 

► KBOI-TV (2) CBS, DuM; Free & Peters; 43,985 

► KIDO-TV (7) ABC, NBC; Blair; 41,900 

Idaho Fallst — 

► KID-TV (3) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Gill-Perna 

32,419 

Lewistont — 

KLEW-TV (3) 2/9/55-Unknown 

Pocatellot — 

KWIK-TV (6) ABC; Hollingbery; 3/26/53-Un- 
known 

Twin Fallst — 

KLIX-TV (11) ABC; Hollinbery; 3/19/53- 
Unknown 

ILLINOIS 

Belleville (St. Louis, Mo.)— 

► WTVI (54) ABC, CBS, DuM; Radio Tv Repre- 

sentatives; 320,000 

Bloomington — 

► WBLN (15) McGillvra; 113,242 
Champaign — 

► WCIA (3) CBS, NBC, DuM; Hollingbery; 307,000 
WTLC (*12) 11/4/53-Unknown 

Chicago — 

► WBBM-TV (2) CBS; CBS Spot Sis.; 1,877,600 

► WBKB (7) ABC; Blair; 2,074,000 

► WGN-TV (9) DuM: Hollingbery; 2,080,000 
WHFC-TV (26) 1/8/53-Unknown 
WIND-TV (20) 3/9/53-Unknown 

► WNBO (5) NBC: NBC Spot Sis.; 2,043,000 
WOPT (44) 2/10/54-Unknown 

WTTW (*11) 11/5/53-Unknown 

Danville — 

► WDAN-TV (24) ABC; Everett-McKinney; 35,000 
Decatur — 

► WTVP (17) ABC, DuM; Boiling; 160,000 
Evanstont — 

WTLE (32) 8/12/53-Unknown 
Harrisburgt — 

► WSIL-TV (22) ABC; Walker; 30,000 
Peoria — 

► WEEK-TV (43) NBC, DuM; Headley-Reed; 

229 274 

► WTVH-TV (19) CBS, ABC; Petry; 229.274 
WIRL Tv Co. (8) Initial Decision 11/5/54 

Quincyt (Hannibal, Mo.) — 

► WGEM-TV (10) ABC, NBC; Avery-Knodel; 

150X00 

► KHQA-TV (7) See Hannibal, Mo. 
Rockford — 

► WREX-TV (13) ABC, CBS; H-R; 256.600 

► WTVO (39) NBC, DuM; Weed: 100.000 
Rock Island (Davenport, Moline) — 

► WHBF-TV (4) ABC. CBS, DuM; Avery-Knodel; 

295,201 
Springfield— 

► WICS (20) ABC, NBC, DuM; Young; 95,000 
Sangamon Valley Tv Corp. (2) Initial Decision 

11/30/54 

INDIANA 

Andersonf — 

WCBC-TV (61) 2/2/55-5/1/55 
Bloomington — 

► WTTV (4) NBC. DuM; Meeker; 622,727 (also 

Indianapolis) 

Directory information is in following order: call 
letters, channel, network affiliation, national rep- 
resentative; market set count for operating sta- 
tions; date of grant and commencement target 
date for grantees. 




Elkhartt— 

► WSJV (52) ABC, NBC, DuM; H-R; 208,139 
Evansville — 

► WFIE (62) ABC, NBC, DuM: Venard; 94,315 

► WEHT (50) See Henderson, Ky. 

Evansville Tv Inc. (7) Initial Decision 10/4/54 

Fort Wayne — 

► WKJG-TV (33) NBC, DuM; Raymer; 132,547 

► WINT (15) See Waterloo 

WANE-TV (69) Boiling; 9/29/54-Unknown 

Indianapolis — | 

► WFBM-TV (6) ABC. CBS. NBC; Katz; 662 000 

► WISH-TV (8) ABC, CBS, DuM; Boiling; 540,020 

► WTTV (4) See Bloomington 

Laf syettet — 

► WFAM-TV (59) CBS, DuM; Rambeau 66,500 ' 
Muncie — 

► WLBC-TV (49) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Hol- 

man, Walker; 107,250 

Notre Dame (South Bend)t — 

WNDU-TV (46) NBC; Meeker; 8/12/54-7/15/55 

Princetont — 

WRAY-TV (52) See footnote (c) 
South Bend— 

► WSBT-TV (34) CBS, DuM; Raymer; 206,473 
Terre Haute — 

► WTHI-TV (10) ABC, CBS, DuM; Boiling; 154,000 
Waterloo (Fort Wayne) — 

► WINT 15) ABC, CBS; H-R; 133,478 

IOWA 

Ames — 

► WOI-TV (5) ABC, CBS, DuM; Weed; 315,600 
Cedar Rapids — 

► KCRG-TV (9) ABC, DuM; Venard; 116,000 

► WMT-TV (2) CBS; Katz; 266,800 

Davenport (Moline, Rock Island) — 

► WOC-TV (6) NBC; Free & Peters; 295,165 
Des Moines — 

► KGTV (17) ABC: Hollingbery; 76,500 

► WHO-TV (13) NBC; Free & Peters; 302,000 
Cowles Broadcasting Co. (8) 3/23/55-Unknown 

Fort Dodget— 

► KQTV (21) NBC, DuM; Pearson; 22,100 
Mason City — 

► KGLO-TV (3) CBS, DuM; Weed; 135,932 
Sioux City — 

► KTIV (4) NBC, ABC. DuM; Hollingbery; 152,835 j 

► KVTV (9) ABC, CBS, DuM; Katz; 152,835 

Waterloo — 

► KWWL-TV (7) NBC, DuM; Headley-Reed; 1 

162,159 

KANSAS 

Great Bendt— 

► KCKT (2) NBC; Boiling; 126,258 
Hutchinson — 

► KTVH (12) CBS, DuM; H-R; 199,012 
Manhattan! — 

KSAC-TV (*8) 7/24/53-Unknown 
Pittsburgt — 

► KOAM-TV (7) ABC, NBC, DuM; Katz, 91,552 : 
Topeka— 

► WIBW-TV (13) ABC, CBS, DuM; Capper Sis.; 

426,427 

Wichita— 

► KAKE-TV (10) ABC; Hollingbery; 195,110 

► KEDD (16) NBC; Petry; 124,311 ' 
Wichita Tv Corp. (3) Initial Decision 8/9/54 

KENTUCKY 

Ashlandt — 

WPTV (59) Petry; 8/14/52-Unknown 
Henderson (Evansville, Ind.) — 

► WEHT (50) CBS; Meeker; 80,831 
Lexington! — 

WLAP-TV (27) 12/3/53-Unknown 

► WLEX-TV (18) NBC, ABC, DuM; Forjoe 

Louisville — 

► WAVE-TV (3) ABC, NBC, DuM; NBC Spot 

Sis ' 434 912 

► WHAS-TV (11) CBS; Harrington, Righter & 

Parsons. See footnote (b) 
WKLO-TV (21). See footnote (c) 
WQXL-TV (41) Forjoe; 1/15/53-Unknown 

Newportf — 

WNOP-TV (74) 12/24/53-Unknown 

LOUISIANA 

Alexandria — 

► KALB-TV (5) NBC, ABC, CBS, DuM; Weed; 

107,600 

Baton Rouge — 

► WAFB-TV (28) ABC, CBS, DuM; Young; 80,000 j 
WBRZ (2) Hollingbery; 1/28/54-4/14/55 (grant- ! 

ed STA March 17) 

Broadcasting • Telecasting * 



Lafayettef — 

KLFY-TV (10) 9/16/53-7/1/55 
Lake Charles — 

► KPLC-TV (7) ABC, NBC; Weed; 66,000 

► KTAG (25) CBS, DuM; Young; 44,550 

Monroe — 

► KNOE-TV (8) CBS, NBC, ABC, DuM; H-R; 

206,000 

New Orleans — 

WCKG (26) Gill-Perna; 4/2/53-Unknown 

► WDSU-TV (6) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Blair; 

306,096 

► WJMR-TV (61) ABC, CBS, DuM; Boiling; 

121,840 

Shreveport — 

► KSLA (12) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM Raymer; 

77,730 

Shreveport Tv Co. (12) Initial Decision 6/7/54- 

See footnote (d) 
KTBS Inc. (3) 2/16/55-9/1/55 

MAINE 

Bangor — 

► WABI-TV (5) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Holling- 

bery; 96,000 

► WTWO (2) CBS; Venard 
Lewiston — 

WLAM-TV (17) See footnote (c) 
Poland Spring — 

► WMTW (8) ABC, CBS, DuM; Harrington, 

Righter & Parsons; 259,933 
Portland — 

► WCSH-TV (6) NBC, DuM; Weed; 164,343 

► WGAN-TV (13) ABC, CBS; Avery-Knodel 
WPMT (53) See footnote (c) 

MARYLAND 

Baltimore — 

► WAAM (13) ABC, DuM; Harrington, Righter 

& Parsons; 598,207 

► WBAL-TV (11) NBC; Petry; 598,207 
WITH-TV (72) Forjoe; 12/18/52-Unknown 

► WMAR-TV (2) CBS; Katz; 598,207 
WTLF (18) 12/9/53-Unknown 

Cumberland! — 

WTBO-TV (17) 11/12/53-Unknown 

Salisbury! — 

► WBOC-TV (16) ABC, CBS, DuM; Burn-Smith; 

50,710 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Adams (Pittsfield) — 

► WMGT (19) DuM; Walker; 169,015 



Boston — 

► WBZ-TV (4) NBC; Free & Peters; 1,290,537 

► WGBH-TV (*2) 

WJDW (44) 8/12/53-Unknown 

► WNAC-TV (7) ABC, CBS, DuM; H-R; 1,290,537 

Brocktonf — 

WHEF-TV (62) 7/30/53-Unknown 
Cambridge (Boston) — 

► WTOA-TV (56) DuM; Everett-McKinney; 

190,000 

Springfield— 

► WHYN-TV (55) CBS, DuM; Branham; 172,000 

► WWLP (61) ABC, NBC; Hollingbery; 172,000 

Worcester — ■ 

WAAB-TV (20) Forjoe; 8/12/53-Unknown 

► WWOR-TV (14) ABC, DuM; Raymer; 86,478 

MICHIGAN 

Ann Arbor — 

► WP AG-TV (20) DuM; Everett-McKinney; 24,000 
WUOM-TV (*26) 11/4/53-Unknown 

Battle Creek— 

WBCK-TV (58) Headley-Reed; 11/20/52-Un- 
known 

Bay City (Midland, Saginaw) — 

► WNEM-TV (5) NBC, DuM; Headley-Reed; 

289,793 

Cadillact— 

► WWTV (13) ABC, CBS, DuM; Weed; 64,920 
Detroit— 

WBID-TV (50) 11/19/53-Unknown 

► WJBK-TV (2) CBS; Katz; 1,553,277 
WTVS (*56) 7/14/54-Unknown 

► WWJ-TV (4) NBC; Hollingbery; 1,466,000 

► WXYZ-TV (7) ABC; Blair; 1,469,000 

► CKLW-TV (9) DuM; Young; 1,496,000. See 

Windsor, Ont. 

East Lansing! — 

► WKAE-TV (*60) 
Flint— 

WJRT (12) 5/12/54-Unknown 
Grand Rapids — 

► WOOD-TV (8) ABC, NBC, DuM; Katz; 510,566 
WMCN (23) 9/2/54-Unknown 

Kalamazoo — 

► WKZO-TV (3) CBS, ABC, NBC, DuM; Averv- 

Knodel; 542,409 



Lansing — 

► WTOM-TV (64) ABC, DuM; Everett-McKinney; 

55,000 

► WJIM-TV (6) ABC, CBS, NBC; Petry; 417,000 
Marquettef — 

WAGE-TV (6) 4/7/54-Unknown 
Muskegont — 

WTVM (35) 12/23/52-Unknown 
Saginaw (Bay City, Midland) — 

► WKNX-TV (57) ABC, CBS; Gill-Perna; 140,000 
Traverse City — 

► WPBN-TV (7) NBC; Holman; 36,965 

MINNESOTA 

Austin — 

► KMMT (6) ABC; Headley-Reed; 54,515 
Duluth (Superior, Wis.) — 

► KDAL-TV (3) ABC, NBC; Avery-Knodel; 93,300 

► WDSM-TV (6). See Superior, Wis. 
WFTV (38) See footnote (c) 

Hibbingt — 

KHTV (10) 1/13/54-Unknown 
Minneapolis (St. Paul) — 

► KEYD-TV (9) DuM; H-R; 585,000 

► WCCO-TV (4) CBS; Free & Peters; 573,300 

► WTCN-TV (11) ABC; Blair; 573,300 

Rochester — 

► KROC-TV (10) NBC; Meeker; 95,833 
St. Paul (Minneapolis) — 

► KSTP-TV (5) NBC; Petry; 573,300 

► WMIN-TV (11) ABC; Blair; 573,300 

MISSISSIPPI 

Biloxit— 

Radio Assoc. Inc. (13) Initial Decision 7/1/54 
(case has been reopened) 
Columbust — 

WCBI-TV (4) McGillvra; 7/28/54-7/1/55 
Jcickson 

► WJTV (25) CBS, DuM; Katz; 68,404 

► WLBT (3) NBC; Hollingbery; 122,765 

► WSLI-TV (12) ABC; Weed; 115,000 

Meridiant — 

WCOC-TV (30) See footnote (c) 

► WTOK-TV (11) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Head- 

ley-Reed; 56,800 
Tupelo! — 

WTWV (9) 12/8/54-Fall '55 



a close look at facts 




WTHI-TV Channel 10 is the ONLY station with 
complete coverage of the Greater 

WABASH VALLEY 

• One of the Mid-west's most prosperous industrial and agricultural markets 

• $714,500,000 Retail Sales in year '53-'54 

• Blanketed ONLY by WTHI-TV's 316,000 watt signal 

• 227,000 Homes (147,000 TV homes) 




118,000 UNDU PLICATED WTHI-CBS TV HOMES! 



Represented nationally by: 

The Boiling Co. New York & Chicago 



TERRE HAUTE, IND. 

316,000 Watts 




Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4. 1955 • Paee 105 



FOR THE RECORD 



MISSOURI 

Cape Girardeau — 

► KFVS-TV (12) CBS; Headley-Reed; 115,200 

Claytont— 

KFUO-TV (30) 2/5/53-Unknown 

Columbia — 

► KOMU-TV (8) NBC, ABC, DuM; H-E; 63,295 

Festust — 

KACY (14) See footnote (c) 

Hannibalt (Quincy, 111.)— 

► KHQA-TV (7) CBS, DuM; Weed; 150,504 

► WGEM-TV (10) See Quincy, 111. 

Jefferson Cityt — 

► KRCG (13) CBS; Hoag-Blair, Blair-Tv 
Joplin — 

► KSWM-TV (12) CBS; Venard; 84,680 
Kansas City — 

► KCMO-TV (5) ABC, DuM; Katz; 483,376 

► KMBC-TV (9) CBS; Free & Peters; 483,376 

► WDAF-TV (4) NBC; Harrington, Righter & 

Parsons; 483,376 

Kirksvillet — 

KTVO (3) 12/16/53-Unknown 

St. Joseph — 

► KFEQ-TV (2) CBS, DuM; Headley-Reed; 129,716 
St. Louis — 

► KETC (*9) 500,000 „ 

► KSD-TV (5) ABC, CBS, NBC; NBC Spot Sis.; 

761,760 

► KWK-TV (4) CBS; Katz 
WIL-TV (42) 2/12/53-Unknown 
KACY (14) See Festus 

► WTVI (54) See Belleville, 111. 

KTVI (36) 3/9/55-Unknown (station currently 
operates on ch. 54 at Belleville, 111. [WTVI 
(TV)] 

Sedaliat — 

► KDRO-TV (6) Pearson; 57,000 

► P KTTS-TV~ (10) CBS, DuM; Weed: 62,370 

► KYTV (3) NBC; Hollingbery; 69,300 

MONTANA 

Billingst— 

► KOOK-TV (2) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Headley- 

Reed; 20,000 

Buttef— 

KOPR-TV (4) See footnote (c) 

► KXLF-TV (6) ABC; No estimate given 

Great Fallst — 

► KFBB-TV (5) CBS, ABC, DuM; Hoag-Blair, 

Blair-Tv; 20,500 

Missoulat — 

► KGVO-TV (13) ABC, CBS, DuM; Gill-Perna; 

18,750 

NEBRASKA 

Hastingst— 

The Seaton Publishing Co. (5) 2/11/55-Un- 
known 
Kearney (Holdrege)— 

► KHOL-TV (13) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Meeker; 

53,492 
Lincoln — 

► KOLN-TV (10) ABC, CBS, DuM; Avery-Kno- 

del; 117,208 

► KUON-TV (*12) 76,618 

Omaha — 

► KMTV (3) ABC, CBS, DuM; Petry; 286,000 

► WOW-TV (6) NBC, DuM; Blair; 286,000 

Scottsblufft — 

KSTF (10) 8/18/54-6/1/55 

NEVADA 

Henderson! — 

► KLRJ-TV (2) NBC; Pearson; 28,200 
Las Vegas— 

► KLAS-TV (8) CBS, ABC, DuM; Weed; 21,244 
Reno — 

► KZTV (8) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Pearson; 

17,250 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Keenet — 

WKNE-TV (45) 4/22/53-Unknown 

Manchester — 

► WMUK-TV (9) ABC, DuM; Weed; 381,338 
Mt. Washingtont— 

► WMTW (8) See Poland Spring, Me. 

NEW JERSEY 

Asbury Parkt— 

WRTV (58) See footnote (c) 

Atlantic City— 

WFPG-TV (46) See footnote (c) 
WOCN (52) 1/8/53-Unknown 

Camdent— 

WKDN-TV (17) 1/28/54-Unknown 



Newark (New York City) — 

► WATV (13) Petry; 4,290,000 

New Brunswickt — 

WTLV (*19) 12/4/52-Unknown 

NEW MEXICO 

Albuquerque — 

► KOAT-TV (7) ABC, DuM; Hollingbery; 50,000 

► KOB-TV (4) NBC; Branham; 55,630 

► KGGM-TV (13) CBS; Weed; 55,630 

Roswellt — 

► KSWS-TV (8) NBC, ABC, CBS, DuM; Meeker; 

25,427 

NEW YORK 

Albany (Schenectady, Troy) — I 
WPTR-TV (23) 6/10/53-Unknown 

► WKOW-TV (41) ABC, CBS, DuM; Boiling; 

150,000 

WTRI (35) See footnote (c) 
DTVZ (*17) 7/24/52-Unknown 

Bingham ton — 

► WNBF-TV (12) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Boi- 

ling; 321,490 
WQTV (*46) 8/14/52-Unknown 
WINR-TV (40) 9/29/54-Unknown 

Buffalo — 

► WBEN-TV (4) ABC, CBS, DuM; Harrington, 

Righter & Parsons; 452,256. See footnote (a). 

► WBUF-TV (17) 170,000 

► WGE-TV (2) NBC, ABC, DuM; Headley-Reed; 

455,043. See footnote (a). 
WTVF (*23) 7/24/52-Unknown 

Carthage (Watertown) — 

► WCNY-TV (7) CBS, ABC, DuM; Weed; 60,960 
Elmira — 

WTVE (24) See footnote (c) 
Ithacat — 

WHCU-TV (20) CBS; 1/8/53-Unknown 
WIET (*14) 1/8/53-Unknown 

Kingston — 

► WKNY-TV (66) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Meeker; 

28,500 

Lake Placidf (Plattsburg)— 

► WIRI (5) DuM; McGUlvra; 80,740 
New York — 

► WABC-TV (7) ABC; Weed; 4,290,000 

► WABD (5) DuM; Avery-Knodel; 4,290,000 

► WCBS-TV (2) CBS; CBS Spot Sis.; 4,290,000 
WGTV (*25) 8/14/52-Unknown 
WNYC-TV (31) 5/12/54-Unknown 

► WOR-TV (9) WOR; WOR-TV Sis.; 4,290,000 

► WPIX (11) Free & Peters; 4,290,000 

► WRCA-TV (4) NBC; NBC Spot Sis.; 4,290,000 

► WATV (13) See Newark, N. J. 

Rochester — 

WCBF-TV (15) 6/10/53-Unknown 

► WHAM-TV (5) NBC, ABC, DuM; Hollingbery; 

300,000 

► WHEC-TV (10) ABC, CBS; Everett-McKinney; 

281,790 

WRNY-TV (27) 4/2/53-Unknown 
WROH (*21) 7/24/52-Unknown 

► WVET-TV (10) ABC, CBS; Boiling; 281,790 

Schenectady (Albany, Troy) — 

► WRGB (6) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; NBC Spot 

Sis.; 425,800 

Syracuse — 

► WHEN-TV (8) ABC, CBS, DuM; Katz; 361,220 
WHTV (*43) 9/18/52-Unknown 

► WSYR-TV (3) NBC; Harrington, Righter & 

Parsons; 361,220 

Utica— 

► WKTV (13) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Cooke; 

159,100 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Asheville — 

► WISE-TV (62) CBS, NBC; Boiling; 37,000 

► WLOS-TV (13) DuM; Venard; 307,610 

Chapel Hillt— 

► WUNC-TV (*4) 377,350 
Charlotte — 

WQMC (36) See footnote (c) 

► WBTV (3) CBS, ABC, NBC, DuM; CBS Spot 

Sis.; 466,402 

Durham — 

► WTVD (11) ABC, NBC; Headley-Reed; 207,760 

Fayettevillet — 

WFLB-TV (18) 4/13/54-Unknown 

Gastoniat — 

WTVX (48) 4/7/54-Unknown 
Greensboro — 

► WFMY-TV (2) ABC, CBS, DuM; Harrington, 

Righter & Parsons; 301,108 

Greenville — 

► WNCT (9) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Pearson; 

102,770 

New Bernt — 

Nathan Frank (13) 2/9/55 -Unknown 



Raleigh — 

► WNAO-TV (28) ABC, 
Knodel; 124,440 



CBS, DuM; Avery- 



Washingtonf — 

WITN (7) 10/27/54-Unknown 
Wilmingtonf — 

► WMFD-TV (6) ABC, NBC; Weed; 50,003 
WTHT (3) 2/17/54-Unknown 

Winston-Salem — 

► WSJS-TV (12) NBC; Headley-Reed; 257.600 

► WTOB-TV (26) ABC, DuM; H-R; 86,200 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Bismarckt — 

► KFYR-TV (5) CBS, NBC, DuM; Hoag-Blair, 

Blair-Tv 26,261 

Fargot — 

► WDAY-TV (6) ABC. CBS, NBC, DuM; Free & 

Peters; 65,000 

Grand Forkst — 

KNOX-TV (10) 3/10/54-Unknown 
Minott — 

► KCJB-TV (13) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Weed; 

26,000 

Valley Cityf— 

► KXJB-TV (4) CBS, DuM; Weed; 69,981 

OHIO 

Akron — 

► WAKR-TV (49) ABC; Weed; 174,066 

Ashtabulat — 

► WICA-TV (15) 116,285 

Cantont — 

Tri-Cities Telecasting Inc. (29) Initial Decision 
11/17/54 

Cincinnati — 

► WCET (*48) 2,000 

► WCPO-TV (9) ABC, DuM; Branham; 724,140 

► WKRC-TV (12) CBS; Katz; 662,236 

► WLWT (5) NBC; WLW Sis.; 525,000 
WQXN-TV (54) Forjoe; 5/14/53-Unknown 

Cleveland — 

WERE-TV (65) 6/18/53-Unknown 

► WEWS (5) ABC, DuM; Branham; 1,084,810 
WHK-TV (19) 11/25/53-Unknown 

► WNBK (3) NBC NBC Spot Sis.; 1,164,000 

► WXEL (8) CBS; Katz; 1,089,000 

Columbus — 

► WBNS-TV (10) CBS; Blair; 427,239 

► WLWC (4) NBC; WLW Sis.; 350,800 
WOSU-TV (*34) 4/22/53-Unknown 

► WTVN-TV (6) ABC, DuM; Katz; 381,451 

Dayton — 

► WHIO-TV (7) CBS, DuM; Hollingbery; 637.330 
WIFE (22) See footnote (c) 

► WLWD (2) ABC, NBC; WLW Sis.; 321,000 

Elyriaf — 

WEOL-TV (31) 2/11/54-Unknown 
Lima — 

WIMA-TV (35) Weed; 1/24/52-Unknown 

► WLOK-TV (73) NBC; H-R; 71,285 

Mansfieldt — 

WTVG (36) 6/3/54-Unknown 
Massillonf — 

WMAC-TV (23) Petry; 9/4/52-Unknown 
Steubenville (Wheeling, W. Va.) — 

► WSTV-TV (9) CBS; Avery-Knodel 1,083,900 
Toledo— 

► WSPD-TV (13) ABC, CBS. NBC, DuM; Katz; 

310,170 

WTOH-TV (79) 10/20/54-Unknown 
Youngstown — 

► WFMJ-TV (21) NBC; Headley-Reed; 149,000 

► WKBN-TV (27) ABC, CBS, DuM; Raymer; 

148.588 
Zanesville — 

► WHIZ-TV (18) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Pear- 

son; 45,000 

OKLAHOMA 

Ada— 

► KTEN (10) ABC; Venard; 180,000 

Ardmoret — 

KVSO-TV (12) 5/12/54-Unknown 
Enid— 

► KGEO-TV (5) ABC; Pearson; 174,780 i 
Lawtont — I 

► KSWO-TV (7) DuM; Pearson; 54,540 
Muskogeet — 

► KTVX (8) ABC, DuM; Avery-Knodel; 248,750! 
Oklahoma City— i 

KETA (*13) 12/2/53-Unknown 
KMPT (19) See footnote (c) 

► KTVQ (25) ABC; 167,381 

► KWTV (9) CBS, DuM; Avery-Knodel; 256,1021 

► WKY-TV (4) ABC, NBC; Katz; 313,060 
Tulsa— 

KCEB (23) See footnote (c) 

► KOTV (6) CBS; Petry; 248,650 
KSPG (17) 2/4/54-Unknown 

► KVOO-TV (2) NBC; Blair; 248,000 
KOED-TV (*11) 7/21/54-Unknown 



Page 106 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



OREGON 

Eugene— 

► KVAL-TV (13) ABC, NBC, DuM; Hollingbery; 

40,109 

Klamath Fallst— 

KFJI-TV (2) Grant; 12/2/54-Summer '55 
Medford — 

► KBES-TV (5) CBS; Hoag-Blair, Blair-Tv; 26,750 
Portland — 

► KLOR (12) ABC; Hollingbery 

► KOIN-TV (6) ABC, CBS; CBS Spot Sis.; 

287,400 

► KPTV (27) NBC; NBC Spot Sis.; 240,806 
North Pacific Tv Inc. (8) Initial Decision 6/16/54 

Salemt— 

KSLM-TV (3) 9/30/53-Unknown 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allentownt — 

► WFMZ-TV (67) Avery-Knodel; 32,000 
WQCY (39) Weed; 8/12/53-Unknown 

Altoona— 

► WFBG-TV (10) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; H-R; 

490,528 

Bethlehem— 

► WLEV-TV (51) NBC; Meeker; 89,307 
Easton — 

► WGLV (57) ABC, DuM; Headley-Reed; 84,915 
Erie — 

► WICU (12) ABC, NBC, DuM; Petry; 208,500 

► WSEE (35) CBS, DuM; Avery-Knodel; 61,670 

Harrisburg — 

► WCMB-TV (27) Forjoe 

► WHP-TV (55) CBS; Boiling; 193,002 

► WTPA (71) ABC, NBC; Headley-Reed; 193,002 

Hazletonf — 

WAZL-TV (63) Meeker; 12/18/52-Unknown 
Johnstown — 

► WARD-TV (56) ABC, CBS, DuM; Weed 

► WJAC-TV (6) CBS, NBC, DuM; Katz; 859,470 

Lancaster — 

► WGAL-TV (8) CBS, NBC, DuM; Meeker; 823,448 
WWLA (21) 5/7/53-Unknown 

Lebanont — 

WLBR-TV (15) See footnote (c) (expects to be 
back on air April 1) 

New Castle — 

WKST-TV (45) See footnote (c) 

Philadelphia — 

► WCAU-TV (10) CBS; CBS Spot Sis.; 1,904,946 

► WFIL-TV (6) ABC, DuM; Blair; 2,043,972 

► WPTZ (3) NBC; Free & Peters; 2,035,222 

Pittsburgh — 

► KDKA-TV (2) CBS, NBC, DuM; Free & Peters; 

1,134,110 

► WENS (16) ABC, CBS, NBC; Petry; 425,000 
WKJF-TV (53) See footnote (c) 

► WQED (*13) 

WTVQ (47) Headley-Reed; 12/23/52-Unknown 
Reading — 

► WEETJ-TV (33) ABC, NBC; Headley-Reed; 

95,000 

► WHUM-TV (61) CBS; H-R; 219,370 
Scranton — 

► WARM-TV (16) ABC; Hollingbery; 200,000 

► WGBI-TV (22) CBS; Blair; 210,000 

► WTVU (73) Everett-McKinney; 250,000 
Sunburyf — 

WROK-TV (38) 2/9/55-Unknown 
Wilkes-Barre — 

► WBRE-TV (28) NBC; Headley-Reed; 235,000 

► WILK-TV (34) ABC, DuM; Avery-Knodel; 

250,000 
Williamsportt — 

WEAK-TV (36) Everett-McKinney; 11/13/52- 

Fall '55 
York— 

► WNOW-TV (49) DuM; Forjoe; 87,400 

► WSBA-TV (43) ABC; Young; 95,000 

RHODE ISLAND 

Providence — 

► WJAR-TV (10) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Weed; 

1,404,002 

► WNET (16) ABC, CBS; Raymer; 88,000 

► WPRO-TV (12) Blair 



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SOUTH CAROLINA 

Anderson — ■ 

► WAIM-TV (40) CBS; Headley-Reed; 127,400 
Camdent — 

WACA-TV (15) 6/3/53-Unknown 
Charleston — ■ 

► WCSC-TV (5) ABC, CBS; Free & Peters; 

166,528 

► WUSN-TV (2) NBC; H-R; 138,500 
Columbia — 

► WCOS-TV (25) ABC; Headley-Reed; 76,000 

► WIS-TV (10) NBC, DuM; Free & Peters; 153,964 

► WNOK-TV (67) CBS; Raymer; 78,000 
Florence — 

► WBTW (8) CBS, NBC, ABC, DuM; CBS Spot 

Sis.; 111,340 
Greenville — 

► WFBC-TV (4) NBC; Weed; 315,717 

► WGVL (23) ABC, DuM; H-R; 113,000 

Spartanburgt — 

WSPA-TV (7) CBS; Hollingbery; 11/25/53- 
Unknown 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Rapid Cityt — 

KOTA-TV (3) 12/8/54-6/1/55 

Sioux Falls — 

► KELO-TV (11) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Raymer; 

112,387 

TENNESSEE 

Chattanooga — 

► WDEF-TV (12) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Bran- 

ham; 132,219 
Mountain City Tv Inc. (3) Initial Decision 
7/5/54 
Jacksont — 

► WDXI-TV (7) CBS; Burn-Smith 
Johnson City — ■ 

► WJHL-TV (11) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Pear- 

son; 129,360 
Knoxville — 

► WATE (6) ABC, NBC; Avery-Knodel; 103,970 
WBIR-TV (10) Initial Decision 1/5/55 

► WTSK-TV (26) ABC, CBS, DuM; Pearson; 

101,890 
Memphis — 

► WHBQ-TV (13) CBS; Blair; 343,078 

► WMCT (5) ABC, NBC, DuM; Branham; 343,078 
WREC Broadcasting Service (3) Initial Deci- 
sion 8/27/54 

Nashville — 

► WSIX-TV (8) ABC, DuM; Hollingbery; 234,750 

► WSM-TV (4) NBC, DuM; Petry; 234,750 
Old Hickory (Nashville) — 

► WLAC-TV (5) CBS; Katz; 237,400 

TEXAS 

Abilenet — ■ _ 

► KRBC-TV (9) ABC, NBC, DuM; Pearson; 43,620 

Amarillo — 

► KFDA-TV (10) ABC, CBS; H-R; 69,933 

► KGNC-TV (4) NBC, DuM; Katz; 69,933 

Austin — _ „ „ 

► KTBC-TV (7) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Raymer; 

112,853 
Beaumontt— 

► KBMT (31) ABC, NBC, DuM; Forjoe; 40,000 
KFDM-TV (6) CBS; Free & Peters; 8/4/54- 

4/24/55 

Bi KBST^TV (4) CBS; Pearson; 7/22/54-July '55 

Corpus Christit— „ „ „„ „ 

► KVDO-TV (22) NBC, ABC, CBS, DuM; Young, 

Brown; 38,850 . . ,„„,,„ 

Gulf Coast Bcstg. Co. (6) Initial Decision 6/17/54 
K-SIX Tv Inc. (10) Initial Decision 1/20/55 

DelllclS 

KLIF-TV (29) 2/12/53-Unknown 

► KRLD-TV (4) CBS; Branham; 456,000 

► WFAA-TV (8) ABC, NBC, DuM; Petry; 456,000 

El Paso — , 

KOKE (13) Forjoe; 3/18/54-Unknown 

► KROD-TV (4) ABC, CBS, DuM; Branham; 

67 585 

► KTSM-TV (9) NBC; Hollingbery; 63,868 

Ft. Worth— „ „ . 

► WBAP-TV (5) ABC, NBC; Free & Peters; 

455 000 

KFJZ-TV (11) H-R; 9/17/54-Spring '55 

► KGUL-TV (11) CBS; CBS Spot Sis.; 378,000 
Harlingent (Brownsville, McAllen. Weslaco)— 

► KGBT-TV (4) ABC, CBS, DuM; H-R; 48,215 

Houston — 

KNUZ-TV (39) See footnote (c) 

► KPRC-TV (2) NBC; Petry; 404,500 

► KTRK-TV (13) ABC, DuM; Blair; 404,500 

► KUHT (*8) 300,000 
KXYZ-TV (29) 6/18/53-Unknown 

Longviewt — . 

► KTVE (32) Forjoe; 45,628 

► U KCBD^TV (11) ABC, NBC; Raymer; 78,812 

► KDUB-TV (13) CBS, DuM; Avery-Knodel; 

78,812 

^KTRE^TV (9) NBC; Venard; 11/17/54-7/1/55 
(Station will receive NBC programs from 
KPRC-TV Houston but is not an NBC affili- 
ate.) 

► KMED-TV (2) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Venard; 
39,250 




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Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 4, 1955 • Page 107 



Odessat — 

Odessa Tv Co. (7) Initial Decision 11/18/54 
San Angelo — 

► KTXL-TV (8) CBS; Melville; 38,598 
San Antonio — 

KALA (35) 3/26/53-Unknown 

KCOR-TV (41) O'Connell; 5/12/54-April '55 

► KENS-TV (5) ABC, CBS, DuM; Free & Peters; 

246 795 

► WOAI-TV (4) ABC, NBC, DuM; Petry; 244,350 
Sweetwatert — 

KPAR-TV (12) CBS; Avery-Knodel; 8/26/53- 
Unknown 
Temple — 

► KCEN-TV (6) NBC; Hollingbery; 112,975 
Texarkana (also Texarkana, Ark.) — 

► KCMC-TV (6) ABC, CBS, DuM; Venard; 112,440 
Tylert— 

KETX (19) See footnote (c) 

► KLTV (7) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Pearson; 

80,294 
Waco!— 

► KANG-TV (34) CBS, ABC, DuM; Raymer; 

46.965 

KWTX-TV (10) Pearson; 12/1/54-4/1/55 
Weslacot (Brownsville, Harlingen, McAllen) — 

► KRGV-TV (5) NBC; Raymer; 48,215 
Wichita Falls— 

► KFDX-TV (3) ABC, NBC; Raymer; 88,430 

► KWFT-TV (6) CBS, DuM; Hoag-Blair, Blair- 

Tv; 89,750 

UTAH 

Salt Lake City — 

► KSL-TV (5) CBS, DuM; CBS Spot Sis.; 170,400 

► KTVT (4) NBC; Katz; 170,400 

► KUTV (2) ABC; Hollingbery; 181,500 

VERMONT 

Montpeliert — 

► WMVT (3) ABC, CBS, NBC; Weed; 121,639 

VIRGINIA 

Bristol! — 

Appalachian Broadcasting Corp. (5) Initial 
Decision 2/1/55 
Danvillet — 

WBTM-TV (24) See footnote (c) 
Hampton (Norfolk) — 

► WVEC-TV (15) NBC, DuM; Avery-Knodel; 

183,000 
Harrisonburg — 

► WSVA-TV (3) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Pearson; 

104,570 
Lynchburg — 

► WLVA-TV (13) ABC, CBS, DuM; Hollingbery; 

201,000 
Newport News — 

► WACH-TV (33) Walker 
Norfolk — 

► WTAR-TV (3) ABC, CBS, DuM; Petry; 352,962 
WTOV-TV (27) See footnote (c) 
Beachview Bcstg. Corp. (10) Initial Decision 

12/23/54 

► WVEC-TV (15) See Hampton 
Petersburgt — 

WVAA (8) 9/29/54-Unknown 
Richmond — 

WOTV (29) 12/2/53-Unknown 

► WTVR (6) NBC; Blair; 484,695 

Richmond Tv Corp. (12) Initial Decision 2/21/55 
Roanoke — 

► WSLS-TV (10) ABC, NBC; Avery-Knodel; 

325,769 

Times-World Corp. (7) Initial Decision 3/16/55 
WASHINGTON 

Bellingham — 

► KVOS-TV (12) CBS, DuM; Forjoe; 158,653 
Pascot — 

► KEPR-TV (19) 47,567 (satellite of KIMA-TV 

Yakima) 
Seattle (Tacoma) — 

► KING-TV (5) ABC; Blair; 422,375 

► KOMO-TV (4) NBC; Hollingbery; 422,375 

► KCTS (*9) 

KCTL (20) 4/7/54-Unknown 
Spokane — 

► KHQ-TV (6) NBC; Katz; 113,360 

► KREM-TV (2) ABC; Petry; 99,247 

► KXLY-TV (4) CBS, DuM; Avery-Knodel; 

106,992 
Tacoma (Seattle) — 

► KTVW (13) Barry, N. Y.; Clark, Chicago; 

422 375 

► KTNT-TV (11) CBS, DuM; Weed; 422,375 
Vancouvert — 

KVAN-TV (21) Boiling 9/25/53-Unknown 
Yakima — 

► KIMA-TV (29) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Weed; 

47.567 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Bluefieldt— 

WHIS-TV (6) Katz; 10/29/54-Unknown 
Charleston — 

► WCHS-TV (8) ABC, CBS, DuM; Branham; 

402,584 

WKNA-TV (49) See footnote (c) 
Clarksburgf — 

WBLK-TV (12) Branham; 2/17/54-Spring '55 
Fairmontt — 

WJPB-TV (35) See footnote (c) 
Huntington— 

► WSAZ-TV (3) NBC, ABC; Katz; 525,265 
WHTN-TV (13) 9/2/54-Spring '55 

Oak Hill (Beckley)t— 

► WOAY-TV (4) ABC; Pearson; 262,840 
Parkersburg — 

► WTAP (15) ABC, NBC, DuM; Forjoe; 35,802 
Wheeling — 

WLTV (51) 2/11/53-Unknown 

► WTRF-TV (7) NBC, ABC; Hollingbery; 306,000 

► WSTV-TV (9) See Steubenville. Ohio 

Page 108 • April 4, 1955 



WISCONSIN 

Eau Claire — 

► WEAU-TV (13) ABC, NBC, DuM; Hollingbery; 

75,000 
Green Bay — 

► WBAY-TV (2) ABC, CBS, DuM; Weed; 210,000 
WFRV-TV (5) ABC, DuM; Headley-Reed; 

3/10/54-4/15/55 

► WMBV-TV (11) See Marinette 
La Crosset — 

► WKBT (8) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Raymer; 

55,000 
Madison — 

► WHA-TV (*21) 

► WKOW-TV (27) CBS; Headley-Reed; 103,000 

► WMTV (33) ABC, NBC, DuM; Boiling; 75,000 
Badger Television Co. (3) Initial Decision 

7/31/54 
Marinettet (Green Bay) — 

► WMBV-TV (11) ABC, NBC; Venard; 175,000 
Milwaukee — 

WCAN-TV (25) See footnote (c) 

► WXIX (19) CBS; CBS Spot Sis.; 393,255 

► WTMJ-TV (4) NBC; Harrington, Righter & 

Parsons; 764,004 

► WTVW (12) ABC, DuM; Petry 
Superiort (Duluth, Minn.) — 

► WDSM-TV (6) CBS, DuM; Free & Peters; 

101,200 

► KDAL-TV (3) See Duluth, Minn. 
Wausau — 

► WSAU-TV (7) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Meeker; 

56,300 

WYOMING 

Cheyennet — 

► KFBC-TV (5) ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; Holling- 

bery; 46,100 

ALASKA 

Anchorage! — 

► KENI-TV (2) ABC, CBS; Weed; 15,000 

► KTVA (11) NBC, DuM; Alaska Radio-Tv Sis.; 

15,000 
Fairbanks! — 

► KFAR-TV (2) NBC, ABC, CBS; Weed 

► KTVF (11) DuM; Alaska Radio-Tv Sales 

HAWAII 

Hilot— 

KHBC-TV (9) 1/19/55-Unknown (granted STA 
March 14) 
Honolulu! — 

► KGMB-TV (9) CBS; Free & Peters; 65,000 

► KONA (11) NBC; NBC Spot Sis.; 69,000 

► KULA-TV (4) ABC, DuM; Young; 69,000 
Wailuku!— 

KMAU (3) 1/19/55-Unknown 

PUERTO RICO 

Mayaguez! — 

Radio Americas Corp. (5) 1/27/55-Unknown 
San Juan! — 

► WAPA-TV (4) ABC, NBC, DuM; Caribbean 

Networks; 43,345 

► WKAQ-TV (2) CBS; Inter-American; 65,000 
Dept. of Education of Puerto Rico (*6) 2/2/55- 

Unknown 

CANADA 

Calgary, Alta.— 

► CHCT-TV (2) CBC; All-Canada, Weed; 13,000 
Edmonton, Alta. — 

► CFRN-TV (3) CBC; Radio Rep., Young; 15,000 
Halifax, N. S.t— 

► CBHT (3) CBC, CBS 
Hamilton, Ont.— 

► CHCH-TV (11) CBC, CBS, NBC; All-Canada, 

Young; 120,000 
Kingston, Ont.! — 

► CKWS-TV (11) Weed; 30,000 
Kitchener, Ont. — 

► CKCO-TV (13) CBC; Hardy, Weed; 102,000 
London, Ont. — 

► CFPL-TV (10) CBC, ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; 

All-Canada, Weed; 95,000 

► CBFT (2) CBC French; CBC; 221,216 

► CBMT (6) CBC; CBC; 221,216 
Ottawa, Ont. — 

► CBOT (4) CBC; CBC; 38,500 
Port Arthur, Ont. — 

► CFPA-TV (2) CBC; All-Canada, Weed; 6,000 
Quebec City, Que. — 

► CFCM-TV (4) CBC; Hardy, Weed; 28,500 
Regina, Sask.! — 

► CKCK-TV (2) CBC, CBS; All-Canada, Weed; 

15,000 
Rimouski, Que.! — 

► CJBR-TV (3) CBC; Stovin, Young; 7,000 
St. John, N. B.!— 

► CHSJ-TV (4) CBC; All-Canada, Weed; 22,638 
Saskatoon, Sask.! — 

► CFQC-TV (8) CBC; Radio Rep., Young; 11,000 
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.!— 

► CJIC-TV (2) CBS; CBC; Weed; 5,000 
Sudbury, Ont.!— 

► CKSO-TV (5) CBC, ABC. CBS, NBC; All- 

Canada, Weed; 14,545 
Sydney, N. S.!— 

► CJCB-TV (4) Weed; 17,426 
Toronto, Ont. — 

► CBLT (9) CBC, ABC, CBS, NBC, DuM; CBC; 

280,000 
Vancouver, B. C.t — 

► CBUT (2) CBC; CBC; 30,000 
Windsor. Ont. (Detroit, Mich.) — 

► CKLW-TV (9) CBC, DuM; Young; 1,496,000 
Winnipeg, Man.! — 

► CBWT (4) CBC; CBC; 5,000 

MEXICO 

Juarez! (El Paso, Tex.)— 

► XEJ-TV (5) National Time Sales; 51,481 
Tijuana! (San Diego) — 

► XETV (6) Weed; 296,402 



UPCOMING 



APRIL 

April 4: RAB Clinic, Billings, Mont. 

April 5: RAB Clinic, Boise, Idaho. 

April 6: RAB Clinic, Portland, Ore. 

April 7: RAB Clinic, Spokane, Wash. 

April 8: RAB Clinic, Seattle, Wash. 

April 8-9: Alabama Broadcasters Assn. meeting, 
Whitney Hotel, Montgomery. 

April 11; Washington State Assn. of Broadcasters 
meeting, Seattle. 

April 12: NARTB Tv Board, NARTB Headquar- 
ters, Washington. _ 

April 13-15: National Federation of Adv. Agen- 
cies Inc. meeting, Escape Hotel, Ft. Lauderdale, 
Fla. 

April 15: Board of Governors, Canadian Broad- 
casting Corp., Parliament Bldgs., Ottawa. 

April 15: Deadline, Nominations for Advertising 
Hall of Fame, New York. 

April 15: Nebraska Broadcasters Assn. meeting, 
Hotel Madison, Norfolk. 

April 15: BMI Clinic, Skirvin Hotel, Oklahoma 
City. 

April 15-16: Spring Technical Conference, Cin- 
cinnati section of Institute of Radio Engineers, 
Engineering Society of Cincinnati Bldg. 

April 17: BMI Clinic, Hotel Samar, Salina. Kan. 

April 17: Kansas Assn. of Radio Broadcasters 
meeting, Hotel Samer, Salina. 

April 17-22: Inside Advertising Week, Hotel Bilt- 
more, New York. 

April 18: New York State Assn. of Radio & 
Television Broadcasters meeting, Utica. 

April 18: RAB Clinic, Milwaukee. 

April 18: BMI Clinic, Hotel Utica, Utica, N. Y. 

April 18-21: National Premium Buyers' Exposi- 
tion, Navy Pier, Chicago. 

April 19: RAB Clinic, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

April 19-23: Society of Motion Picture & Televi- 
sion Engineers, Drake Hotel, Chicago. 

April 20: Peabody Award presentation, Hotel 
Roosevelt, N. Y. 

April 20: CBS Inc. stockholders meeting. 

April 20: RAB Clinic, Detroit. 

April 20: BMI Clinic, Hotel Somerset, Boston. 

April 21: RAB Clinic, Cleveland. 

April 21-23: American Assn. of Adv. Agencies an- 
nual meeting and dinner, Boco Raton Hotel and 
Club, Boca Raton, Florida. 

April 21-23: Southern California Adv. Agencies 
Assn. meeting, El Mirador Hotel, Palm Springs, 
Calif. 

April 22: BMI Clinic, Bangor House, Bangor, Me. 

April 22: RAB Clinic, Cincinnati. 

April 25: Texas Assn. of Broadcasters meeting, 

Gunter Hotel, San Antonio. 
April 28-29: Pennsylvania Assn. of Broadcasters 

meeting, Bedford Springs Hotel, Bedford. 

MAY 

May 2: Deadline applications, Weed Broadcasting 
Scholarship, Iowa State College, Ames. 

May 2: RAB Clinic, Chicago. 

May 3: RAB Clinic, Peoria, 111. 

May 4: RAB Clinic, Louisville, Ky. 

May 5: RAB Clinic, Indianapolis, Ind. 

May 5-8: American Women in Radio & Televi- 
sion Annual Convention, Drake Hotel, Chicago. 

May 6: RAB Clinic, Fort Wayne, Ind. 

May 15: Deadline Applications WAAM Television 
Fellowship, Johns Hopkins U., Baltimore. 

May 16: RAB Clinic, Trenton, N. J. 

May 16-17: Chicago Tribune Forum on Distribu- 
tion and Advertising, WGN studio, Chicago. 

May 17: RAB Cilinic, Philadelphia. 

May 18: RAB Clinic, Pittsburgh. 

May 19: RAB Clinic, Buffalo, N. Y. 

May 20: RAB Clinic, Syracuse, N. Y. 

May 22-26; NARTB .Convention, Shoreham and 
Sheraton-Park hotels, Washington. 

May 22: Radio Pioneers Banquet, Washington. 

May 31: Deadline, Fund for the Republic Tele- 
vision Awards (script contest), New York. 

May 31: RAB Clinic, St. Louis. 

(RAB Clinics are scheduled through Nov. 18.) 

JUNE 

June 1: RAB Clinic, Wichita, Kan. 
June 2: RAB Clinic, Denver. 
June 3: RAB Clinic, Salt Lake City. 
June 6-8: National Community Tv Assn. conven- 
tion, Park Sheraton Hotel. New York. 

June 13: BMI Clinic, Turf Club, Twin Falls, 
Idaho. 

June 13: RAB Clinic, New York. 

June 14: BMI Clinic, Rainbow Hotel, Great Falls, 
Mont. 

June 14: RAB Clinic, Hartford, Conn. 
June 15 : BMI Clinic, Hotel Utah, Salt Lake City. 
June 15: RAB Clinic, Boston. 
June 16: RAB Clinic, Manchester, N. H. 
June 17: BMI Clinic, Hotel Denver, Glenwood 
Springs, Colo. 

June 17: BMI Clinic, Edgewater Beach Hotel, De- 
troit Lakes, Minn. 

June 17: RAB Clinic, Bangor, Me. 

June 17-18: Colorado Broadcasters Assn. meeting, 
Denver Hotel, Glenwood Spring. 

June 20-22: National Assn. of Tv & Radio Farm 
Directors meeting, Washington. 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



ON THE DOTTED LINE 




CONTRACT to sponsor Dodge News Final five nights a week on WLAC-TV Nashville is 
agreed to by the Dodge Dealers of Middle Tennessee. Signing the pact is Jim Brady, 
Jim Brady Motor Co., McMinnville, chairman of the group's advertising committee. With 
him are (I to r): John O'Connor, Dodge representative; Ray Bauer, Dodge district man- 
ager; Mack Sawyer, Cumberland Motor Co., Nashville (world's oldest Dodge franchise); 
T. B. Baker Jr., WLAC-TV Inc. executive vice president and general manager; W. W. 
(Bill) Walker, WLAC-TV commercial manager, and Loy G. Hardcastle, Hardcastle Motor 
Co., Franklin, advertising committee member. 




COMPLETING arrangements between 
WVJS Owensboro, Ky., and Green River 
R.E.A. (appliance division), for 52-week 
sponsorship of A Chat With Jack McClure, 
featuring County Agent Jack McClure, are 
(I to r): seated, Mr. McClure and J. R. 
Miller, R.E.A. manager, and (standing), 
Leola C. Hayden, WVJS promotion man- 
ager-salesman, and Elton Dawson, de- 
partment manager for the appliance di- 
vision. The station believes that the con- 
tract may represent the first on-the-air 
sponsorship of a county agent. 



June 20- July 1: WSM-Peabody College Radio-Tv 
Workshop, Nashville, Tenn. 

June 26-29: Adv. Assn. of the West convention, 
Portland, Ore. 

June 27: RAB Clinic, Bismarck, N. D. 

June 27-30: Western Assn. of Broadcasters (Cana- 
dian) convention, Jasper Park Lodge, Jasper, 
Alberta. 

June 28: RAB Clinic, Minneapolis. 
June 29: RAB Clinic, Omaha, Neb. 
June 30: RAB Clinic, Des Moines, Iowa. 

JULY 

July 11-31: Institute in Live & Filmed Tv, U. of 
Miami, Coral Gables, Fla. 

AUGUST 

Aug. 1-9: Educational Television Workshop, Mich- 
igan State College, East Lansing. 

SEPTEMBER 

Sept. 12-14: CBS Radio Affiliates meeting, Detroit. 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



AMERITONE's first tv contract, calling for 
thirteen 75-minute feature films on KRCA 
(TV) Hollywood., is signed by (I to r) Beep 
Roberts, station account executive; Victor 
Schneider, executive, Vi-Cly Industries 
Inc. (manufacturers of Ameritone Vinyl- 
Bond Paint), and Harold Dreyfus, presi- 
dent, Dreyfus Co., Los Angeles agency. 




THE JIM BURKE Buick Co. completes ne- 
gotiations with WBRC-TV Birmingham, 
Ala., to sponsor Million Dollar Movie, Sun- 
days, 10 to 11:30 p.m., for 52 weeks, ef- 
fective immediately. L to r: Oliver Naylor, 
WBRC-TV general sales manager; Mr. 
Burke; Tom Whitley, WBRC-TV account 
executive, and J. Robert Kerns, station 
vice president-managing director. 




THE ROYAL CROWN Bottling Co., New- 
ark, N. J., will sponsor the Ames Brothers 
in a 15-minute musical show beginning 
April 1 on WABD (TV) New York. At the 
signing are (I to r): seated, Eugene F. 
Donnelly, RC executive vice president; 
George L. BarenBregge, WABD general 
manager; standing, William T. Blair, RC 
advertising manager, and Perry Frank, 
WABD sales staff. 




BROADCASTING 
TELECASTING 



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address 

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April 4, 1955 • Page 109 



editorials 



Juvenile Jury 

IT WAS just about four years ago that Sen. Estes Kefauver be- 
came the first politician to star on television. With a slight strain 
of the memory it is possible to recall that a minor Kefauver-for- 
President boom followed his sudden exposure as the righteous and 
relentless ringmaster of the Senate crime committee hearings of 
1951. 

One finds it hard to suppress the suspicion that Mr. Kefauver 
hopes to do it all again — this time, he presumably hopes, with more 
success. The national political conventions are to be held next 
year. This week he will begin a new round of hearings on a subject 
of popular interest. 

He is chairman of the Senate Juvenile Delinquency Subcom- 
mittee, which has $125,000 to spend. His first big order of busi- 
ness will be to spend part of it on public hearings to investigate 
the effects of television programming on juvenile crime. 

At this stage, the projected hearings do not seem to promise 
the intense drama and occasional, if unintentional, comedy of Mr. 
Kefauver's first big production. It is doubtful that there will be 
witnesses as fascinating as, say, Frank Costello, the shy gangster, 
or Virginia Hill, who testified to "trysts," as the tabloids of the 
times called them, with such practiced trysters as Bugsy Siegel, 
the late West Coast director of Murder Inc. 

The Senator will indeed have difficulty in assembling another 
cast like that. But he is a resourceful man, and undoubtedly a 
hungry one after nearly four lean years without much attention 
from the public. He can be counted on to get as much excite- 
ment out of juvenile delinquency as juvenile delinquents themselves. 
Somewhere, we cannot help thinking, he has hidden a junior Frank 
Costello, a mere slip of a Virginia Hill, who await his cue to come 
rushing with their eye-popping stories to the cameras and the 
microphones. 

Certainly the cameras and microphones will be there, if Sen. 
Kefauver has to lug them in himself. He already has hinted that 
his committee would never be one to ban coverage by radio and 
television. The principle of admitting radio-tv to public hearings 
is, of course, sound. The Senator is to be commended for adhering 
to that principle. 

In this case, broadcasters are in a rather ticklish position, since 
it is they, in a sense, who will be on trial at the very hearing which 
they have been invited to cover. It is to be hoped, however, that 
they are not frightened into overplaying Mr. Kefauver's show. 

To be sure, they cannot ignore it in their newscasts. They are 
not, however, under compulsion to rebuild the Senator into a can- 
didate for the Democratic Presidential nomination in 1956 — not 
even if he produces from the wings a whole mob of wee hoodlums. 



Dollars for Football 

FOLLOWERS of the history of college football television last 
week got the impression that this was where they came in. NBC 
bought, for a reported $1.3 million, the television rights to the 
seven "national" games which the National Collegiate Athletic Assn. 
will permit to be telecast this year. 

Last year ABC paid roughly $4 million for the right to tele- 
cast 13 games, and lost its shirt. It is not to criticize NBC, which 
won the rights by competitive bidding, to say that the price is still 
ridiculous. What is worse, the system is still ridiculous too. 

The new NCAA football tv plan represents a slight concession 
to the regional interests of its members, but it is still a long way 
from the unrestricted television that must eventually come. 

It is still, in short, rigidly controlled programming, with the 
NCAA continuing to act as a central authority of great power. 

The original NCAA control formula was based on panicky 
predictions that tv would demolish the gate receipts needed to 
support high-pressure football. Through a curious logic foreign 
to classroom teachings, the fears were soon accepted as facts on 




the basis of inadequate and inconclusive research that reflected 
the drama of tv's arrival in many communities. 

College officials committed another pedagogical blunder when 
they refused to recognize the conclusive research data in the 
Jerry Jordan studies, which used gate receipts to show how 
entrance of tv in an area sets up a "honeymoon" period after 
which people go back to normal living habits — and normal sta- 
dium attendance. They compounded their blunder by maneuver- 
ing research data to yield conclusions not justified by the field 
findings. 

In the long run, the NCAA will have to relinquish its tight con- 
trol and let its members decide their television futures for them- 
selves — that is, if the cherished academic freedom of American 
universities and colleges is not to be barred at the stadium gate. 



Network 'Studies'; Uptown & Downtown 

SOME semblance of orderly procedure seems to be emerging | 
from the confusion precipitated by the Plotkin and Jones re- 
ports stemming from the overall television situation. 

It looks as though the FCC, after all, will get funds to conduct 
its own "study" of networks, now that the House has approved an 
$80,000 special appropriation ear-marked for this purpose. The 
Senate Commerce Committee proposes to spend a substantial part ! 
of its $200,000 budget for an overall "study" looking toward up- ij 
dating of the Communications Act to fit present conditions, which M 
were undreamed of in 1934 when the Act became law. 

The FCC, of course, still has to hurdle the Senate on its ap- 
propriation, but since much of that which it hopes to develop will M 
be of basic value to the Magnuson Committee, approval should be w 
forthcoming. The FCC for several years has asked Congress to ';' 
give it additional funds for this special study, but has been stopped 9, 
by the House, in which appropriations originate. 

Once the FCC gets money, it will be in a position to chart its 
course. At that time, it is evident, it should consult the Magnuson 
Committee on the scope of its activity, so that the Committee's J 
special staff will not duplicate this work, and concentrate on those 
matters not otherwise covered. 

The FCC is an expert body. It is an arm of the legislative 
branch — a point made repeatedly by Chairman Magnuson and his ! 
predecessors and subscribed to by FCC's new chairman, George m 
C. McConnaughey. The extent to which the Senate Committee, 9 
which has many other things to do, involves itself in a grass-roots 
inquiry into the network-tv field, will depend in large measure I 
upon how well the FCC does its job, assuming, of course, that the 
Senate concurs in giving it the funds. (\ 



Page 110 • April 4, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



AN EXPERT SHOW... 

because all the stars are experts 




HOMEMAKERS 



Each personality on "The Homemakers" is an expert in her 
own fie d chosen for this show because she is an IZ t tZ 
bnngs talent, knowledge and entertainment to thoCndTo 
housewives m the WBAL-TV audience 

WtreJdlT 11 F f day ' 1:30 t0 2:00 PM ' ■ • wh *t ho-wife 
m t ready to relax at this hour? It's lunch time the tine 
they srt down for an hour and treat themselves to ^ 
more about everything that interests them most * 
Known as the Women's Magazine of the Air, "The Home 
makers' combine all the factors usually found ln ™ 
different magazines. It's a 30 minute fL 

^g d to e hi" £7!? f memakerS " * b ^ed by merchandis- 

Z£2£ rokers> appIiance distribut - a " d — 



NBC AFFILIATE • TELEVISION BALTIMORE 

Nationally Represented by 
EDWARD PETRY & CO. 



WBAL-TV 




X ' 

MARY LANDIS 
Cooking Expert 

This culinary gen- 
ious stresses variety 
in meals. Her fam- 
ous recipes have 
been collected on 
her travels through- 
out the world. 




MOLUE MARTIN 
Homemaking Expert 

Inspiring and 
friendly Mollie 
brings amazing new 
interests to all 
housewives plus 
most intriguing 
interviews. 




BOB JONES 
Expert Announcer 

Bob adds continuity 
from one set to 
another . . . keeps 
the show moving 
When he does a 
commercial, he sells 

BUT GOOD! 



o 



SOME GIRLS from an agency named 
X were blowing feathers at a coffee 
break, each telling the others what 
a wonderful time buyer she was. 

"I got the fattest slide rule in the 
business," said Bettv. "I figure if a 
rate per thousand doesn't figure, it 
doesn't figure." 

"Listen, sweetheart," put in Sue, 
"if that's what you want, there's a 
station in Iowa. . . ." 

"No commercials," broke in 
Carol. "I follow the ratings. You 
can't never go wrong with an audi- 
ence, especially if there's a man in 
it, I always say." 

"Audience! You can't hardly beat 
this eastern Iowa audience. And 
it's not only bi-sexual. It's bi-source- 
ful— farm and industrial," said Sue. 

"What about buying power?" 
asked a fourth lady. "And signal 
strength? What about coverage 
and set count? You can't just deep- 
freeze them." 

"They're thawed, honey. Do you 
know that WMT-TV, repped by 
Katz, reaches a potential quarter 
million homes with regional and 
CBS jewels?" chimed in Sue. 

"Nope— and I don't give a damn. 
Sav, how come you're so high on 
this WMT-TV?" 

"It's my passion for truth, dearie. 
Besides, who do you think is paying 
for this ad?" 



APRIL 11, 1955 



35c PER COPY 



TELECASTING 



Complete Index 
Page 10 



he Pay-See Cauldron 
Begins to Boil 
Page 31 

Cory Sues Revlon, 
Weinrraub, CBS 
Page 33 

Republic May Film 
For Tv Exclusively 
Page 42 

Tv Research Urged 
t Del inquency Probe 
Page 79 




Radio-Active Homemakets ! 




Radio is truly the housewife's constant companion . . . because Radio alone 
permits her to work and listen too. 

As she goes about her daily chores, she listens in the kitchen, in the 
living room, in the bedroom — in fact, throughout the house. 
And she's listening even more this year than last. 

And, Spot Radio turns Radio-Active homemakers into customers for advertisers. 



EATURE SECTION 

Begins on Page 63 



HE NEWSWEEKLY 
f f RADIO AND TV 



WSB 

WFAA" 

KOA 

WIKK 

KPRC* 

WJIM 

KARK 
KABC 



Atlanta 

/Dallas \ 
\Ft. Worth/ 

Denver 

Erie 

Houston 

Lansing 

Little Rock 
Los Angeles 



NBC 

NBC 
ABC 

NBC 
NBC 
NBC 
/NBC 
\ABC 
NBC 
ABC 



KSTP 

WABC 

WTAR 

WIP 

WRNL 

WOAI* 

KFMB 

KGO 



/Minneapolis! NBC 
\St. Paul J 



New York 
Norfolk 
Philadelphia 
Richmond 
San Antonio 
San Diego 



ABC 
CBS 
MBS 
ABC 
NBC 
CBS 



San Francisco ABC 



KMA Shenandoah ABC 

(Iowa) 

KTBS Shreveport NBC 

KVOO Tulsa NBC 

ABC Pacific Radio 

Regional Network 

"Also represented as key 
stations of the 
TEXAS QUALITY NETWORK 



EDWARD PETRY & CO., ivc . 



NEW YORK • CHICAGO • LOS ANGELES 



DETROIT 



ST. LOUIS 



SAN FRANCISCO 



ATLANTA 



COLGATE-PALMOLIVE COMPANY 



^raditionatty in tke public C^on^idi 



evice 



Colgate-Palmolive's top position in a highly competitive field is a 
mark o£ consumer confidence. A confidence built and maintained by 
years of continuing research and experience in producing quality 
products that give maximum results. In the field of broadcasting 
and telecasting, quality pays off in results. Havens 8c Martin, Inc., Stations 
provide a variety of programs of superior quality developed by years 
of first-hand experience in serving a loyal and responsive audience in 
one of the South's richest areas. Join with confidence the growing 
list of advertisers who convert vast audiences into sales over the First Stations 
of Virginia, WMBG-AM, WCOD-FM and WTVR-TV-Richmond's 

only complete broadcasting institution. 



PIONEER NBC OUTtETS FOR VIRGINIA'S FIRST MARKET 

WMBG am WCOD ™ WTVRtv 

MAXIMUM POWER 100,000 WATTS • MAXIMUM HEIGHT 1049 FEET 

WTVR Represented Nationally by BLAIR TV, INC. 
WMBG Represented Nationally by THE BOLLING CO. 




'RE PROUD OF OUR SHARE 
THE TEXAS GULF COAST 



I 



and too — we're 
proud that 
KGUL-TV s 

audience grows 
and grows 

The Houston-Galveston Area 
A. R. B. for February 1955 
also shows that KGUL-TV is 
consistently increasing its au- 
dience for more programs 
than either of the other two 
stations in the area. 



Comparison of February 1955 

Quarter Hour Increases (5 p.m.-12:00 p.m.) 



with 




with 


October '54 


January 


140 






138 


K 






K 


G 
U 


105 






G 
U 


L 


Station 

B 






L 



80 

Station 

B 



*for example 



6 AND 6:30 P.M. 
KGUL-TV HAS 64.4% 
OF THE AUDIENCE 

MONDAY THRU SATURDAY 

(A.R.B. February 1955 
For Houston-Galveston Area) 



HOUSTON 




• GALVESTON 



KGUL-TV and only one other 
station on the air 
in October 




Beat Bat/ w/lekaA 




GULF TE LEVISION COMPANY 
i GULF 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY CBS TELEVISION SPOT SALES 



GALVESTO N 
CHANNEL 




Published every Monday, with Yearbook Numbers (53rd and 54th issues) published in January and July by Broadcasting Publications, Inc., 1735 
DeSales St., N.W., Washington 6, D. C. Entered as second class matter March 14, 1933, at Post Office at Washington, D. C, under act of March 3, 1879. 



d / ng / OWs kewevt . . . and growing all the time 



day, there have been many happy returns for both viewers and advertisers. 
In six years' time, WGAL-TV has grown from a pioneer in the 
field of television to a vital and dominant public-service force. Still growing, 
WGAL-TV enters its seventh year with a pledge to continue to give 
its viewers, its abundant area and its advertisers many happy returns. 





On March 18, 1949, WGAL-TV televised its first show. Since that 



WGAL-TV 



LANCASTER, PA. NBC • CBS • DUMONT 



STEINMAN STATION 
Clair McCollough, Pres. 



Representatives 



MEEKER TV, Inc. 



New York Los Angeles 

Chicago San Francisco 



Page 4 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting 



closed circuit 



FEWER CHIEFS, MORE INDIANS • 

Now that NARTB has telescoped its 17 
district meetings into eight regional con- 
ferences, movement is afoot to reduce 
size of NARTB board by eliminating all 
17 district directors. Project, however, 

I is not scheduled for consideration at an- 
nual convention next month. View ad- 
vanced is that board, with overall mem- 
bership of 41, is too unwieldy and that 
association might revert to variation of old 
system of having clear channel, medium 
station and small station directors, plus 

| tv and fm directors. 

B»T 

WLW Cincinnati, pre-eminent clear chan- 
nel station, may soon appoint national 
sales representative for radio and perhaps 
tv. WLW now maintains its own sales 
offices in New York and Chicago for both 
radio and tv but is represented in Detroit 
and on West Coast by NBC Spot Sales 
for both services (Crosley, in turn, repre- 
sents NBC owned and operated stations in 
Cincinnati, Dayton and Columbus.) Move 
presumably would entail transfer of Carlos 
I Franco, general sales manager in New 
I York, to Cincinnati headquarters as well 
as shift of Chicago personnel. 

B»T 

SUBSCRIPTION STUDY • Louis Haus- 
man, staff vice president of CBS Inc., re- 
| cently promoted from CBS-Columbia to 
20th floor echelon, is heading subscription 
tv task force as special project. Initial 
study of toll tv was undertaken months 
ago by Sidney Alexander, economic ad- 
visor to CBS President Frank Stanton, and 
Hausman-directed project is in prepara- 
tion for preliminary FCC proceeding next 
month. (For status report on toll tv issue, 
see page 31.) 

B»T 

CLOSED MEETINGS in New York last 
week with AT&T Long Lines executives 
and special NARTB committee on rates 
reportedly revealed that AT&T and asso- 
ciated companies are realizing some return 
on coaxial cable and microwave relays 
but apparently below usual common car- 
rier profit margin. Heading AT&T group 

\ in conversations are: R. L. Helmreich, di- 
rector of operations, Long Lines Dept.; 
H. I. Romnes, chief engineer — operations; 
and Frank A. Cowan, assistant director of 
operations — engineering, Long Lines Dept. 
NARTB subcommittee includes Richard 
Salant, CBS Inc. vice president; Chris 
Witting, president, Westinghouse Broad- 
casting Co., and W. D. (Dub) Rogers, 
KDUB-TV Lubbock, Tex., but number of 
other station and network engineering 
executives have participated. Report of 
committee will be submitted to NARTB 

j convention next month. 

B»T 

DAYTIME FILMS • Details of new day- 
time tv program plan whereby stations run 



filmed programs once without payment, 
receiving films and all rerun rights in ex- 
change, to be outlined tomorrow (Tues- 
day) by Harry Trenner, president, newly 
formed Station Film Library Inc., at news 
conference in New York. First presenta- 
tion of plan in selected markets under- 
stood to have produced good station re- 
sponse. 

B»T 

MBS understood to be screening execu- 
tives for national sales manager post. Vice 
presidency probably would be attached to 
job. 

B»T 

TABLE TALKS • Cross-section of tv 
broadcasters affiliated with all networks 
will meet with Senate Majority Leader 
Lyndon B. Johnson (D-Tex.) at luncheon 
in Washington next Tuesday, April 19, 
and hold forth with members of FCC at 
dinner session same evening. Group 
sparked by P. A. (Buddy) Sugg, WKY-TV 
Oklahoma City, presumably will advance 
affiliates' view toward tv network situa- 
tion, underscoring necessity of networks 
in light of both Congressional and FCC 
"studies". In addition to Chairman Sugg, 
group includes: Walter J. Damm, WTMJ- 
TV Milwaukee; James D. Shouse, Crosley; 
Jack Harris, KPRC-TV Houston; David 
M. Baltimore, WB RE-TV Wilkes-Barre; 
A. H. Kirchhofer, WBEN-TV Buffalo; 
Charles H. Crutchfield, Jefferson Stand- 
ard Broadcasting Co., Charlotte, N. C; 
L. H. (Bud) Rogers II, WSAZ-TV Hunt- 
ington, W. Va.; Edwin K. Wheeler, WWJ- 
TV Detroit; Victor A. Sholis, WHAS-TV 
Louisville, and Harold See, KRON-TV 
San Francisco. 

B»T 

THAT hitherto undisclosed Procter & 
Gamble product placing radio-tv spot cam- 
paign effective April 18 in about 75 mar- 
kets [B»T, April 4] is Golden Fluffo. Short- 
ening has been using spot in several mar- 
kets but will expand coverage to promote 
its yellow color. Biow-Beirn-Toigo, New 
York, is agency. 

B»T 

BLUE NOTES • There's nothing on 
NARTB's convention agenda yet, but May 
meeting is bound to take up, at some point, 
increasingly difficult problem of how to 
cope with off-color recordings that flood 
stations. Hot discs usually are fed to disc 
jockeys who slip same by station reception- 
ists. Even most severe station discipline 
can't remove danger of risque numbers. 

B»T 

IMMINENT retirement of Col. Edwin 
L. White, chief of FCC Safety & Special 
Radio Services Bureau (see page 98), 
after 33 years of government service, may 
be forerunner of number of top level staff 
changes in FCC. There's prospect that 
Curtis B. Plummer, chief of Broadcast 
Bureau and former chief engineer, who 



is expert in aeronautical and safety field, 
may take over Col. White's post. Who 
will head important Broadcast Bureau is 
problematical but there's considerable sen- 
timent in favor of John J. FitzGerald, who 
has carried load in Opinions & Review. 

B»T 

SPOT SPREAD • Contrary to most sales- 
manship concepts, NBC Radio in its new 
Monitor series is willing to say flatly to 
advertisers: "Don't buy one or two-time 
shots with Monitor." NBC figures series of 
announcements, spread over weekend, will 
produce maximum results (see page 52). 

B»T 

WITH INITIAL decisions on comparative 
hearing cases involving tv approaching 
point of being current, FCC may shortly 
transfer number of staff attorneys to Opin- 
ions & Review staff, which writes final 
decisions for FCC, to eliminate bottle- 
neck there. Ten attorneys are in O&R 
branch under Chief John L. FitzGerald, 
who took over last fall. Since last Dec. 
9, when James D. Cunningham became 
chief examiner, 15 tv initial decisions have 
been issued. 

B»T 

HIS HONOR • J. Patrick Beacom, owner 
of WVVW Fairmont, W. Va. and of sus- 
pended WJPB-TV (ch. 35), is candidate 
for mayor of Fairmont, and, according to 
reports, is shoo-in May 1. He served two 
terms in West Virginia legislature. 

B»T 

WHILE headquarters of Westinghouse 
Broadcasting Co. move next month to 
New York (space has been leased in Chanin 
Bldg., 122 E. 42nd), Joseph E. Baudino, 
executive vice president, and his immedi- 
ate staff will remain in Washington to 
cover regulatory front. Operating direc- 
tion of WBC stations has been assigned by 
President Chris Witting to Don McGan- 
non, who joined WBC three months ago, 
after having served in second slot at Du- 
Mont Network. Mr. McGannon was 
elected to WBC board last month. 

B»T 

AWARDS FOR COMMERCIALS • 

Trade-wide survey has been instituted by 
Sam Shain, editor of Space & Time (In- 
side Advertising) on attitude toward awards 
for radio and tv commercials. Comments 
range from "too many awards now" to 
all out support. "Handle with care" ad- 
monition underscores most attitudes. 

B»T 

WALL STREET JOURNAL, which caught 
merry ned from many broadcasters and 
Station Representatives Assn. because of 
its March 21 lead story headlined "Fad- 
ing Radio," is now going to do follow-up 
on what goes in non-network radio. Num- 
ber of important stations over country 
have been asked for comments, and Joseph 
M. Guilfoyle, who authored March 21 
piece, is motorman on follow-up job, too. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 5 



There's unanimity in Kansas City: 

No matter how you count the audience 
the no. 1 station is 



HERE IS THE WHB 
LEADERSHIP LINE-UP: 
FIRST PLACE— HOOPER 

Average share of audience, 7 a.m. -6 p.m. 
Mon.-Sat., Jan.-Feb., 1955 
FIRST PLACE— TRENDEX 

Average share of audience, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. 
Mon.-Fri., Jan.-Feb., 1955 
FIRST PLACE— PULSE 

Average share of audience, 6 a.m.-6 p.m. 
Mon.-Sat., Jan.-Feb., 1955 




-CONTINENT BROADCASTING COMPANY 

President: Todd Storz 

KOWH, Omaha 

Represented by 
H-R Reps, Inc. 



10,000 WATTS, 710 KC 

This is what Mid-Continent programming, 
ideas and excitement have achieved for 
WHB! All three national surveys— PULSE, 
HOOPER, TRENDEX— give WHB the top 
daytime spot with ratings as high as 48.9% 
(Hooper). So no matter which ratings you 
buy by, your best Kansas City buy is WHB. 
Talk to the man from Blair or WHB General 
Manager, George W. Armstrong. 



WTIX, New Orleans 

Represented by 
Adam J. Young, Jr. 



WHB, Kansas City 

Represented by 
John Blair & Co. 



Page 6 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



at deadline 



Fourteen Directors Elected 
To NARTB Radio Board 

FOURTEEN places on NARTB Radio Board 
filled, effective with May convention, in elec- 
tion process completed Friday, according to 
C. E. Arney Jr., secretary-treasurer. 

Directors elected in odd-numbered districts 
follow: 

I — Herbert L. Krueger, WTAG Worcester, 
Mass., re-elected. 

3 — George H. Clinton, WPAR Parkersburg, 
W. Va., re-elected. 

5 — Owen F. Uridge, WQAM Miami, replac- 
ing John Fulton, WQXI Atlanta. 

7 — Robert T. Mason, WMRN Marion, Ohio, 
replacing F. Ernest Lackey, WHOP Hopkins- 
ville, Ky. (elected as small station director). 

9_William Holm, WLPO LaSalle, 111. (un- 
opposed), replacing Hugh K. Boice Jr., WEMP 
Milwaukee. 

II — F. E. Fitzsimmonds, KFYR Bismarck, 
N. D., re-elected. 

13 — Alex Keese, WFAA Dallas, replacing 
Kenyon Brown, KWFT Wichita Falls, Tex. 

15— William D. Pabst, KFRC San Francisco, 
re-elected. 

17— Richard M. Brown, KPOJ Portland, 
Ore., re-elected. 

Large Stations — John M. Outler Jr., WSB 
Atlanta (two years, most votes), and John F. 
Patt, WJR Detroit (one year), replacing John 
H. DeWitt Jr., WSM Nashville, and Martin B. 
Campbell, WFAA Dallas (resigned). 

Medium Stations— Cecil B. Hoskins, WWNC 
Asheville, N. C, replacing G. Richard Shafto, 
WIS Columbia, S. C. 

Small Stations— F. Ernest Lackey, WHOP 
Hopkinsville, Ky., replacing Edgar Kobak, 
WTWA Thomson, Ga. 

Fm Stations— Edward A. Wheeler, WEAW- 
FM Evanston, 111., replacing Ben Strouse, 
WWDC-FM Washington. 

Regional Meeting Schedule 
Of NARTB Opens Sept. 19 

NEW schedule of eight NARTB regional meet- 
ings, replacing 17 district meetings, set up Fri- 
day by C. E. Arney Jr., secretary-treasurer. 
Itinerary gives members of NARTB traveling 
party and "flea circus" time to return to home 
offices between meetings. Schedule follows: 

Region 4 (Dist. 7, 8, 

9, Ky., Ohio, Ind., 

Mich., 111., Wis.) 
Region 1 (Dist. 1, 2, 

New England States, 

N. Y.. N. J.) 
Region 3 (Dist. 5, 6, 

Fla., Ga., Ala., Miss., 

La., Ark., Tenn., 

Puerto Rico) 
Region 2 (Dist. 3, 4, 

Pa., Del., Md., W. 

Va., D. C. Va., 

N. C, S. C.) 
Region 8 (Dist. 15, 16, 

17, Wash., Ore., 

Calif., Nev., Ariz., 

Hawaii, Alaska) 
Region 7 (Dist. 14, 

N. M., Colo., Utah, 

Wyo., Idaho, Mont., 

Western S. D.) 
Region 5 (Dist. 10, 11, 

Minn., N. D., East- 
ern S. D., Iowa, 

Neb., Mo.) 
Region 6 (Dist. 12, 13, 

Kan., Okla., Tex.) 



Sept. 
19-21 

Sept. 
21-23 

Sept. 
26-28 



Oct. 
12-14 



Oct. 
24-26 



Nov. 
1-3 



Nov. 
7-9 



Edgewater 
Beach Hotel, 
Chicago 
Saranac Inn, 
Saranac, N. Y. 

Jung Hotel, 
New Orleans 



Roanoke Hotel 
Roanoke, Va. 



Nov. 
15-17 



St. Francis 
Hotel, San 
Francisco 

Broadmoor 
Hotel, Colorado 
Springs 

Fort Des 
Moines Hotel, 
Des Moines 

Baker Hotel, 
Dallas 



2,100-MILE TV REMOTE 

KTTV (TV) Los Angeles will stage 
2,100-mile remote Tuesday when it car- 
ries four-hour coverage of Salk Polio 
vaccine report direct from National 
Foundation for Infantile Paralysis Con- 
ference at Ann Arbor, Mich. KTTV will 
sign on at 6:45 a.m., telecasting entire 
conference, described as what may be 
most significant medical announcement of 
century. Equipment flown to Ann Arbor 
for pickup. Ed Reimers will describe con- 
ference and conduct interviews. Robert 
Breckner, program director, and Edward 
Benham, chief engineer, in charge of 
planning. Station booked only outgoing 
tv line from Ann Arbor to Toledo. It will 
make program available to other stations 
and networks on pool basis. 



CBS-TV, NBC-TV Reveal 
Summer Hiatus Plans 

SUMMARY of summer hiatus policy for ad- 
vertisers on CBS-TV and NBC-TV was reported 
last Friday, but plans from DuMont and 
ABC-TV were not as yet available. 

CBS-TV's hiatus policy will be in effect from 
July 3 to Aug. 27 and provides for suspension 
of broadcasting in Class A periods from 8-11 
p.m. EST Monday through Friday; 6-11 p.m. 
Saturday and 5-11 p.m. Sunday. Shared spon- 
sorship programs are excluded from eligibility. 
Sponsors of alternate-week periods are entitled 
to hiatus of four alternate-week broadcasts dur- 
ing summer. 

Advertisers and agencies have been advised 
to notify CBS-TV of intention to suspend dur- 
ing summer period by May 1. At same time 
firm commitment for resumption of broadcast- 
ing should be made for minimum of 13 weeks, 
effective with first broadcast following end of 
hiatus. (Upon completion of this commitment, 
normal cancellation cycles may be resumed.) 

NBC-TV's summer interval plan does not 
specify any dates but is confined to periods ad- 
vertisers may select. Hiatus also is for eight- 
week period for sponsored programs in Class 
A time from 7:30-10:30 p.m. EST weekdays, 
and 5-11 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. It does 
not apply to co-sponsored programs. To be 
eligible, advertiser must have sponsored show 
for 13 weeks prior to hiatus and must sign non- 
cancellable contract to resume broadcasting at 
conclusion of summer interval. 

Alabama Broadcasters Review 
Management, Cost Problems 

SERIES of station and individual awards pre- 
sented to Alabama stations by Associated 
Press as Alabama Broadcasters Assn. opened 
weekend meeting in Montgomery. J. Dige 
Bishop, WCTA Andalusia, ABA president, pre- 
sided at meetings. 

Oliver S. Gramling, AP assistant general 
manager, presented station awards for out- 
standing performance to WAPI Birmingham, 
WOWL Florence, WBRC Birmingham, WTBF 
Troy and WHBS Huntsville. Individual awards 



IDEAL DOLL NEGOTIATING • Ideal Doll 
Co., through Grey Adv., N. Y., understood 
to be negotiating for possible sponsorship of 
Macy Day Parade on NBC-TV next Thanks- 
giving, as well as sponsorship of children's show 
on either CBS-TV or NBC-TV. 

MONTICELLO RADIO • Monticello Drug 
Co., Jacksonville, for 666 (malaria prepara- 
tion), starting radio spot announcement cam- 
paign mostly on Negro-appealing programs in 
coastal areas. Campaign breaks May 15, Thurs- 
days and Fridays, for 52 spots in 35 markets. 
Charles M. Hoyt, N. Y., is agency. 

GRIFFIN SPOTS • Griffin Mfg. Co., Brook- 
lyn (shoe polish), through Bermingham, Castle- 
man & Pierce, N. Y., starting annual radio 
campaign using spots, 7 to 9 a.m., effective 
mid-April in southern markets, about 48 sta- 
tions, then traveling north as weather gets 
warmer. Contracts run from 26 to 32 weeks. 

FALSTAFF IN TEXAS • Falstaff Brewing 
Corp. (Falstaff beer) working out budget to use 
nighttime spots in radio for 26-week campaign 
in Texas area. Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, New 
York agency, will probably place campaign ef- 
fective late April or early May. 

MOTOR WEEK • Participations on NBC-TV's 
Today (Mon.-Fri.) have been bought for sev- 
eral automobile manufacturers for week of 
April 18-22, coinciding with negotiations on 
new contract with United Automobile Workers 
Union (CIO). That week program, which will 
originate in Detroit, will present participations 
for Oldsmobile (through D. P. Brother), Pon- 
tiac and Cadillac (MacManus, John & Adams), 
Chrysler (McCann-Erickson), Buick (Kudner), 
Chevrolet (Campbell-Ewald), DeSoto (BBDO) 
and Packard (Ruthrauff & Ryan). 

went to Maury Farrell, Cal Douglas, Dan Dan- 
iels, Fred Taylor, WAPI; Richard Biddle, Nell 
Bigbee, Bill Mapes, Shirley Moseley, WOWL; 
Davenport Smith, Dave Campbell, WBRC; Jess 
Jordan, Asa Dudley, WTBF; John Neal, Hud- 
ley Crockett, WHBS. 

T. E. Martin, WAPX Montgomery, ABA 
legislative chairman, directed panel covering 
legislative activities. Charles H. Tower, 
NARTB labor manager, moderated panel on 
management problems and was luncheon speak- 
er. W. Emmett Brooks, WEBJ Brewton, spoke 
on wage-hour problems. 

Panel on remote control of transmitters was 
led by Hoke Williford, WAPX Montgomery. 
Taking part were Malcolm Street, WHMA An- 
niston, and Louis Blizzard, WHOS Decatur. 
F. S. HoIIiday, FCC liaison officer, spoke on 
Conelrad. Pat M. Courington, WAVU Al- 
bertville, explained ways of keeping operating 
costs at a minimum. 

New Hazel Bishop Product 

HAZEL BISHOP Inc. has started nationwide 
shipment of new product, Compact Makup. 
Additional $3 million budget has been allocated 
for introductory campaign of this new product, 
Raymond Spector, board chairman of Hazel 
Bishop and president of Raymond Spector 
Agency, announced. Negotiations are underway 
for purchase of two additional tv shows and 
time on CBS-TV and NBC-TV. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 7 



it lakes KPTV's 
Television Giant 
to cover the 
Portland, Oregon 




GAYLE V. GRUBB, V. P., West Coast Sales Manager, 111 Sutter St., San Francisco, SUtter 1-8689 
STORER NATIONAL jqm HARKER, V. P., National Sales Director, 118 E. 57th Street, New York, ELdorado 5-7690 

SALES HEADQUARTERS BO b WOOD. Midwest National Sales Manager, 230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, FRanklin 2-6498 



Represented 
Nationally by 
NBC Spot Sales 



PEOPLE 




NBC Buy of WBUF-TV 
Awaits FCC Approval 

FORMAL application for NBC's purchase of 
ch. 17 WBUF-TV Buffalo filed with FCC late 
Friday along with promise that upon Commis- 
sion consent to $312,500 cash sale, NBC "will 
devote its full efforts to establishing that uhf 
can compete in a major market in which two 
vhf stations are already in operation." Net- 
work expects to lose nearly $360,000 in first 
year of uhf operation there. 

NBC earlier bought ch. 30 WKNB-TV New 
Britain, Conn., for $600,000, also subject to 
FCC consent. It becomes first network and 



CHAIRMAN'S CHUCKLE 

WHILE FCC Chairman George C. Mc- 
Connaughey wouldn't commit himself 
on Commission's subscription tv policy 
during Capitol Cloakroom program on 
CBS Radio (Sat., 6:30-7 p.m.), he 
chuckled when Panelist Ted Church 
asked if he'd heard crack, "Television 
cannot exist half free, half fee." Chair- 
man was more specific in discussing oth- 
er basic radio-tv problems (story page 
98). 



second station operator to acquire full limit 
of five vhf and two uhf stations. WBUF-TV 
purchase came month after Plotkin Report 
cited two-vhf station market is "most difficult" 
for uhf operator [B«T, Feb. 7]. 

Application stated WBUF-TV, now airing 
ABC shows, "will carry the NBC television 
network program service" as soon as "out- 
standing commitments permit." Other stations 
operating in market include ch. 2 WGR-TV, 
present NBC affiliate, and ch. 4 WBEN-TV, 
CBS affiliate. WBUF-TV suspended operation 
earlier this year, resumed upon conclusion of 
negotiations with NBC [B*T, March 14]. 

Since WBUF-TV principals Sherwin Gross- 
man and Gary L. Cohen have leased present 
site for 1 5 years to WGR-TV, companion appli- 
cation was tendered to move WBUF-TV to new 
site under NBC ownership. Technical facilities 
specified effective radiated power of 469 kw 
visual and 235 kw aural with antenna height 
above average terrain 489 ft. Estimated first year 
operating cost of $917,000 and revenue $558,000 
were given. 

WBUF-TV balance sheet showed net loss to 
Dec. 31, 1954, was $236,324.42 while net loss 
in January was $12,196.78. WBUF-TV's total 
assets at end of January were $470,082.95 with 
total liabilities and deferred income $627,- 
354.15. NBC balance sheet as of Feb. 28 
showed current assets $50,008,462, total assets 
$77,315,992, current liabilities $33,241,099, 
capital stock $6,500,000, earned surplus $37,- 
082,393. 

Fresno All-Uhf Plea 

PETITION for rule-making to make Fresno, 
Calif., all-uhf commercial tv market filed with 
FCC Friday by ch. 47 KJEO (TV) there which 
asks that educational reservation on ch. 18 be 
switched to ch. 12. KARM Fresno awaits 
final ruling on initial decision favoring it over 
KFRE there for ch. 12. KJEO pointed out it 
and ch. 24 KMJ-TV have built tv market there, 
not served by any other vhf station. KJEO 
followed other de-intermixture petitions filed 
last week (early story page 93). 

| Broadcasters Oppose Pay-See 

I FORMATION of New England Broadcasters 
for Free Tv to oppose pay-as-you-see television 
announced Friday by Leon P. Gorman, general 
manager, WABI-AM-TV Bangor, Me. Mr. 

I Gorman said group will attempt to consolidate 

I opposition to toll tv among elements of broad- 
casting industry and cooperate with other or- 

| ganizations. 



Westinghouse Management 
Meetings Set This Week 

PROGRAM managers and film buyers of West- 
inghouse Broadcasting Co. tv stations — WBZ- 
TV Boston, WPTZ (TV) Philadelphia, KDKA- 
TV Pittsburgh, KPIX (TV) San Francisco- 
meet today (Monday) for session on film pro- 
gramming, hearing film company presentations 
during day, concluding with evening session on 
feature films. Live tv programming will be 
discussed tomorrow at all-day session of pro- 
gram managers. Richard Pack, WBC national 
program manager, will preside at two-day meet- 
ing in New York. General managers, program 
managers, sales managers and promotion man- 
agers of WBC tv stations will spend Wednes- 
day-Friday at Skytop Club at Cresco, Pa., for 
three-day discussion of general station manage- 
ment problems with group of top WBC execu- 
tives headed by Chris Witting, president. 

House, FCC Set Session 

HOUSE Commerce Committee will hold brief- 
ing session with FCC Wednesday on Com- 
mission's legislative program this year. Ex- 
pected to come up for discussion are FCC's 
proposal to amend Sec. 309 (c) of Communica- 
tions Act and proposals by Reps. Oren Harris 
(D-Ark.) and Carl Hinshaw (R-Calif.) to limit 
tv, towers to 1,000 feet (H J Res 138 and 139, 
respectively). Sen. Warren G. Magnuson (D- 
Wash.) has introduced bill (S 1648) to amend 
Sec. 309 (c) (protest procedures) in Senate (see 
story page 97). 



UPCOMING 

April 11: Washington State Assn. of 

Broadcasters, Seattle. 
April 12: NARTB Tv Board, NARTB 

Headquarters, Washington. 
April 12-14: Radio-Electronics-Tv Mfrs, 

Assn. spring meeting. Hotel Roose- 

valt, N. Y. 
April 13-15: National Federal of Adv. 

Agencies Inc., Escape Hotel, Ft. 

Lauderdale, Fla. 
April 15: Board of Governors, Canadian 

Broadcasting Corp., Parliament Bldgs., 

Ottawa. 

April 15: Nebraska Broadcasters Assn., 
Hotel Madison, Norfolk. 

April 17: Kansas Assn. of Radio Broad- 
casters, Hotel Samer, Salina. 
For other Upcomings, see page 725. 



ALFRED PAUL BERGER, former copy chief 
at Emil Mogul Co., N. Y., and recently head of 
his own agency, rejoins Mogul as member of 
plans board. 

ART THORSEN, script writer at WBBM Chi- 
cago, appointed continuity editor, succeeding 
JOSEPH L. STRADER, who becomes engi- 
neering schedule manager at WBBM-TV. 

H. S. GWYNNE, manager, market plans and 
analysis, tube industry sales section, RCA Tube 
Div., appointed manager of section. 

F. A. (MIKE) WURSTER, formerly with 
BBDO and WABD (TV) New York, to Kies- 
wetter, Baker, Hagedorn & Smith, N. Y., as 
media director, succeeding ELIZABETH 
THOMPSON ANDERSON, retiring after 10 
years with agency. 

JULIUS ROSEN, executive vice president, 
elected president of Charles Antell Inc., and 
LEONARD ROSEN re-elected chairman of 
board, it was announced Friday. Both pur- 
chased all stock and interests of company from 
CHARLES KASHER, former president. Ac- 
count still contemplating new agency [B*T, 
March 28]. 



Central Region of AAAA 
Elects Bliss President 

ELECTION of new officers and governors for 
Central Region of American Assn. of Adv. 
Agencies, including that of Vincent R. Bliss, 
president of Earle Ludgin & Co., as president, 
announced in Chicago Friday. 

L. O. Holmberg, Compton Adv., named vice 
chairman and E. J. Lauesen, Fuller & Smith & 
Ross, elected secretary-treasurer. Four new 
governors are F. Strotter Cary, Leo Burnett 
Co.; James G. Cominos, Needham, Louis & 
Brorby; Clinton E. Frank, Clinton E. Frank 
Inc., and Milton H. Reynolds, Allen & Reyn- 
olds. Five ex-officio officers, including G. 
B. Bogart of Calkins & Holden, new AAAA 
Chicago Council chairman, also will serve on 
new board. Two more ex-officio members to 
serve after forthcoming St. Louis and south- 
west elections. 

Twenty-one state region will plan its fall 
Chicago convention shortly after national 
AAAA meetings in Boca Raton, Fla., April 
21-23. 

MBS Ticket-Tv Forum 

SPECIAL program will be carrier April 17 on 
Mutual's Northwestern Reviewing Stand (Sun., 
11:30-12 noon EST), titled "What About Sub- 
scription Tv?" Panel will consist of Trueman 
T. Rembusch, midwestern director, Organiza- 
tions-forFree-Tv; Larry Wolters, tv editor, Chi- 
cago Tribune; Joseph S. Wright, general coun- 
sel, Zenith Radio Corp., and James McBurney, 
dean of School of Speech, Northwestern U., 
moderator. 

'Mickey Mouse' Sponsors 

SIGNING of four additional sponsors for 
Mickey Mouse Club, new Walt Disney series 
scheduled to bow Oct. 3 in Mon.-Fri. 5-6 p.m. 
time slot, was announced Friday by Slocum 
Chapin, vice president in charge of network 
sales, ABC-TV. Newly-signed sponsors are: 
American Dairy Assn., Chicago, through Camp- 
bell-Mithun, same city; Carnation Co., Los An- 
geles, through Erwin, Wasey & Co., same city, 
Mars Inc., Chicago, through Leo Burnett Co., 
same city, and Welch Grape Juice Co., West- 
field, N. Y., through Kenyon & Eckhardt, New 
York. Eight national advertisers have signed 
to sponsor series to date. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 9 



the week in brief 



Broadcasting Publications Inc. 
Sol Taishoff 
President 

Maury Long H. H. Tash B. T. Taishoff 

Vice President Secretary Treasurer 



PAY TV: THE POT BOILS 

Flood of comments at FCC is biggest 
in years. Zenith cancels CBS show 
for refusal to carry pro-subscription 
tv commercial 31 

COTY SAYS THEY STOLE IT 

Cosmetic firm sues Revlon, W eintraub 
and CBS, says its commercial theme 
for new lipstick was picked up by 
competitor 33 

FASHION DESIGNS A SHOWROOM 

$6 million center in New York will be 
fitted for radio-tv facilities 34 

REPUBLIC DEBATES GOING TV-ONLY 

Film company is considering dropping 
movie production in favor of video . 42 

PRESIDENT TO ADDRESS THE NARTB 

Eisenhower will appear for informal 
speech, becomes first U. S. President 
to do so. Record exhibits planned . 50 

NBC RADIO DETAILS ITS 'MONITOR' 

Network announces inside breakdown 
for revolutionary week-end plan. .52 

'YOU ARE THERE' GOES TO FILM 

CBS documentary series began on 
radio, went to live tv, now is on cel- 
luloid ,V.i . . 63 

THE STATUS OF FILM 

B*T survey finds broadcasters are us- 
ing it for more than a third of all air 
time 66 

FILM RATINGS FOR 10 MARKETS 

A new series of monthly reports of the 
top 10 syndicated shows in 10 selected 

cities 70 



TV AND DELINQUENCY 

Witnesses at Senate hearing urge ex- 
haustive study to determine television's 
effect on juvenile behavior 79 

FREE STUMPING ON THE AIR? 

Comr. Hennock urges Senators to prod 
Commission into making a mandatory 
ruling that stations provide campaign 
time for free 90 

LAMB BRIBE ISSUE RETAINED 

FCC refuses petition to drop broad- 
caster's charge that Commission inves- 
tigators caused bribe offer for false 
testimony 90 

DE-INTERMIXTURE SENTIMENT 

Three uhfs petition FCC for channel 
changes in order to maintain better 
competitive atmosphere 93 

THREE VHFS PROPOSED 

,. Initial decisions would make ch. 7_ 
grants in Seattle and Omaha, ch. 12 in 
Jacksonville 96 

McCONNAUGHEY AIRS HIS VIEWS 

FCC chairman, interviewed on CBS 
Radio, makes known his stand on 
today's top issues 98 

STORER REPORTS HIS EARNINGS 

Broadcasting company notes its 1954 
net was 10 times that of 1945 . .100 

DUMONT'S 'ELECTRONIC AM' 

New film-live camera system may be 
shown to public Thursday 104 

THE PEABODY RADIO-TV AWARDS 

Top individual honors to Gobel, Daly. 
CBS wins four, NBC and ABC three. 
Station winners: W JAR-TV, KGAK. 




departments 

Advertisers & Agencies 33 

At Deadline 7 

Awards 105 

Closed Circuit 5 

Editorial 126 

Education 107 

Feature Section 63 
Film 42 

Page 10 • April 11, 1955 



For the Record 109 

Government 79 

In Review 15 

International 106 

In the Public Interest. . 76 

Lead Story 31 

Manufacturing 104 

Networks 52 



On All Accounts . 26 

Open Mike 18 

Our Respects 22 

Professional Services. 107 
Program Services 44 
Programs & Promotion 108 

Stations 100 

Trade Associations 50 



THE NEWSWEEKLY OF RADIO AND TELEVISION 

Published Every Monday by Broadcasting 
Publications Inc. 

Executive and Publication Headquarters 
Broadcasting • Telecasting Bldg. 
1735 DeSales St., N.W., Washington 6, D. C. 

Telephone: MEtropolitan 8-1022 

EDITOR & PUBLISHER 
Sol Taishoff 

MANAGING EDITOR 
Edwin H. James 
SENIOR EDITORS 
Rufus Crater (New York), J. Frank Beatty, Bruce Robertson 
NEWS EDITOR 
Fred Fitzgerald 
SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR 
David Glickman 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
Earl B. Abrams, Lawrence Christopher 
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR: Don West 
ASSISTANT EDITOR: Harold Hopkins 
STAFF WRITERS: Ray Ahearn, Jonah Gitlitz, 
Louis Rosenman, Peter Pence. 
LIBRARIAN: Norma Wooton 
EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS: Kathryn Ann Fisher, Eli Fritz, 
Joan Sheehan, Audrey Cappella. SECRETARY TO THE 
PUBLISHER: Gladys L. Hall. 

BUSINESS 

VICE PRESIDENT & GENERAL MANAGER 
Maury Long 
SALES MANAGER 
Winfield R. Levi (New York) 
SOUTHERN SALES MANAGER: Ed Sellers 
PRODUCTION MANAGER: George L. Dant 
TRAFFIC MANAGER: Harry Stevens 
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING: Wilson D. McCarthy 
Eleanor Schadi, M. Gwen Moore. 
AUDITOR-OFFICE MANAGER: Irving C. Miller 
ASSISTANT AUDITOR: Eunice Weston. 
ART-LAYOUT: Duane McKenna 

CIRCULATION & READERS' SERVICE 

MANAGER 
John P. Cosgrove 
Frank N. Gentile, Joel H. Johnston, Sharleen Kelly, 
Jean McConnell, George Neitzey, William Phillips. 

BUREAUS 

NEW YORK 
444 Madison Ave., Zone 22, Plaza 5-8355 

Editorial 
SENIOR EDITOR: Rufus Crater 
AGENCY EDITOR: Florence Small 
ASS'T NEW YORK EDITOR: David W. Berlyn 
NEW YORK FEATURES EDITOR: Patricia Kielty 
NEW YORK ASSIGNMENTS EDITOR: Rocco Famighettl 
Selma Gersten, Sally Creley 

Business 

SALES MANAGER: Winfield R. Levi 
SALES SERVICE MANAGER: Eleanor R. Manning 
EASTERN SALES MANAGER: Kenneth Cowan 
Dorothy Munster 

CHICAGO 

360 N. Michigan Ave., Zone 1, CEntral 6-4115 
MIDWEST NEWS EDITOR: John Osbon 
MIDWEST SALES MANAGER: Warren W. Middleton 
Barbara Kolar 

HOLLYWOOD 

6253 Hollywood Blvd., Zone 28, Hollywood 3-8181 
WESTERN NEWS EDITOR: Leo Kovner 
TV FILM EDITOR: Marjorie Ann Thomas 

WESTERN SALES MANAGER: Wallace H. Engelhardt 

Toronto: 32 Colin Ave., Hudson 9-2694. James Montagnes. 

SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION 
Annual subscription for 52 weekly issues: $7.00. Annual 
subscription including BROADCASTING Yearbook (53d 
issue): $9.00, or TELECASTING Yearbook (54th issue): 
$9.00. Annual subscription to BROADCASTING • TELE- 
CASTING, including 54 issues: $11.00. Add $1.00 per 
year for Canadian and foreign postage. Regular issues: 
35c per copy; 53d and 54th issues: $3.00 per copy. 

ADDRESS CHANGE: Please send requests to Circulation 
Dept., BROADCASTING • TELECASTING, 1735 DeSales St., 
N.W., Washington 6, D. C. Give both old and new 
addresses, including postal zone numbers. Post office 
will not forward issues. 

BROADCASTING* Magazine was founded in 1931 by 
Broadcastting Publications Inc., using the title: BROAD- 
CASTING* — The News Magazine of the Fifth Estate. 
Broadcast Advertising* was acquired in 1932, Broadcast 
Reporter in 1933 and Telecast* in 1953. 

*Reg. U. S. Patent Office 
Copyright 1955 by Broadcasting Publications Inc. 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



WOODIand CENTER 



30,000 SQUARE FEET of the most modern complete broadcasting facilities 

in Western Michigan 




Completion of WOODIand CENTER marks 
a long line of "firsts" in the facilities and 
services offered you by WOOD. In 1924, 
WOOD was Grand Rapids' first radio station. 
Today, it's Grand Rapids' only 5000 watt sta- 
tion, covering the heart of the rich WOOD- 
Iand market area. WOOD-TV was Western 
Michigan's first TV station on the air, first 
anywhere to deliver 316,000 watts from a 
1000'tower. Other Western Michigan WOOD 
TV firsts are: 

• Local Live Programs 

• AT&T Network Service 

• Color Service 

• INS Fax News Photo Service 

If you, too, want to be first in Western Mich- 
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FIRST FLOOR 



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3. Announcer's Booth 

4. Radio Control Room 

5. Recording Studio 

6. Music Record tibrary 

7. Film Editing 

8. Film Projection 

9. Film Developing 



10. Announcer's tounge 

11. Engineer s tounge 

12. Shipping Room 

13. Office Supplies 

14. Maintenance Shop 

15. TV Power Room 

16. Heating, Air Conditioning 

17. Telephone Equipment 





J 



Studio A, 60'x 40', is equipped with 39 suspended 
lighting fixtures . . . permits simultaneous display 
of 8 automobiles on one set. 




Loading ramp adjoins TV studios . . . permits truck 
unloading at bed level on one side; driving of 
autos from 100-car parking lot on other side. 



Unique central TV control room serves both Studio 
A and Studio B . . . makes possible split-second 
shifts from one studio to another. 




News department is complete with every modern 
device for fast service, via local police radio sys- 
tems, AP wires. International News Facsimile Photos. 



News Department 7. 

TV Control 8. 

TV Studio A 9. 

TV Studio B 10. 

Loading Ramp 1 1 . 
Program Department 



>ND FLOOR 

Dressing Rooms 
Chief Engineer 
Accounting 

TV Announcer's Booth 
Audio-Video Rack Room 



1. TV Studio A 

2. TV Studio B 

3. Client Viewing Room 

4. Conference Room 

5. Traffic, Continuity 

6. Promotion 



THIRD FLOOR 

7. Sales 

8. Sales Manager 

9. Sec, General Manager 

10. General Manager 

11. Business Service 

12. Women's Lounge 





Studio B, 30'x 40', houses a complete kitchen unit 
for homemaking shows, which can be screened off 
by folding doors when desired. 




Fully equipped dark room permits quick develop- 
ment of on-the-spot movie and still shots made by 
WOOD-TV news correspondents. 




Client's room overlooks TV studios; has color and 
black-and-white TV. Remote controlled panels 
reveal film audition screen, easel displays. 




In the continuity department, scripts are written . . . 
commercials prepared . . . slides and other visual 
props arranged for clients. 



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TELEVISION 



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• Top-rated network and locally produced 
programs 




Expanded audience-participation facilities permit full 
enjoyment of local programs . . . here, Buckaroo Rodeo, 
favorite of the younger set. 




Projection room has three film projectors; two Telo- 
jectors with a capacity of 12 slides each; and Telop 
projector which holds 10 telop cards. 




All props, from the largest background flat to the 
smallest, most delicate properties, are carefully handled 
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Everything from Bach to boogie is quickly available in 
the extensive WOODland CENTER music library. 



serving all of Western Michigan! 

woodQ 




GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN 

ASSOCIATED WITH WFBM-AM AND TV. INDIANAPOLIS. INDIANA 
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NORTH 
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Rich, Growing 



"GOLDEN 
TRIANGLE" 




IN REVIEW 



REUNION IN VIENNA 

THE LAST 15 minutes of "Reunion in Vienna" 
were almost worth watching the first 75 — but 
not quite. It was Greer Garson's television 
debut, and it was a sorry show. 

Biggest puzzle of the performance was trying 
to decide what the playwright had in mind. 
After it was over you guessed it must have been 
an attempt at romantic comedy, but it succeeded 
only in being an unsuccessful farce. 

The play dealt with has-been aristocracy in 
Vienna in the 1930's. A band of the former 
favorites of the court had decided to have a 
party to recall the "old days." Miss Garson 
played a former member of the court set who 
was now the wife of a successful psychoanalyst. 
She was enticed to go to the party on the prom- 
ise that a former lover, an exiled archduke, 
would attend. Her husband, who felt he had 
been competing with the memory of the lover 
all those years, encouraged her to go so she 
could get him out of her system. 

She went, she saw, and she was almost con- 
quered. In fact, she was almost seduced right 
before the nation's televiewers. It may have 
been sophisticated on the stage, but it came 
through as indecent on tv. Brian Aherne, as 
the playboy archduke, was distastefully lecher- 
ous instead of romantically naughty. 

Only in the third act did a professional touch 
grace the show. The scene in which the amo- 
rous archduke confronts the husband and baldly 
demands permission to make love to his wife 
was wittily written and adroitly played. Espe- 
cially clever was the ending. The husband 
had left the wife and would-be-lover alone for 
the night, sort of putting them on their honor. 
You thought they were going to "do the right 
thing" about it all when suddenly the lights 
dimmed and the camera left them holding 
hands on a terrace. When the husband re- 
turned in the morning everyone was gay as 
birds, and the viewer suspected the worst. Then, 
at the close, the wife produced a medal which 
the archduke had given her and recited a 
motto — evil to him who evil thinks! Then 
it was the viewer's turn to blush. 

Television can ill afford to waste the talents 
of people like Miss Garson. It's to be hoped 
she and others like her — along with the view- 
ers — won't be scared off by occasional blunders. 

Production costs: $300,000. 

Broadcast on NBC-TV, Mon., April 4, in color 
and black-and-white, on Producer's Show- 
case, monthly series sponsored by Ford Motor 
Co. through Kenyon & Eckhardt and RCA 
through Kenyon & Eckhardt and Grey Adv. 
Agency. 

NBC producers: Fred Coe; guest producer: Jean 
Dalrymple; associate producer: Bill Nichols; 
director: Vincent Donahue; associate direc- 
tor: Dominick Dunne. 

Adapted for tv by David Shaw from play by 
Robert Sherwood. 
\ Stars: Greer Garson, Brian Aherne, Peter Lone, 
Robert Fleming, Cathleen Nesbitt, Lilli Dar- 
vas, Herbert Berghof. 

Settings: Rouben Ter-Artunian; makeup: Dick 
Smith; musical director: Harry Sosnik; techni- 
cal director: Larry Elikann; unit manager: 
Perry Cross. 

THE WHISTLER 

TO THE devotees of mystery drama on radio, 
the return of The Whistler to the full CBS 
Radio network after a hiatus of eight years 
should prove welcome. This program has long 
been a steady favorite on the West Coast. 

Perhaps it should be explained, for the benefit 
of the uninitiated, that the Whistler is a hollow 



voice, omnipresent and omniscient, which sets 
the scene and narrates the innermost thoughts 
of some miscreant in the process of a crime. 

The stories usually follow a pattern: The 
person is driven by circumstances to commit 
his crime; he apparently is successful in cover- 
ing his tracks; and at the final moment, a trick 
of fate reveals his guilt. 

In one episode, "Alibi," a murderer has con- 
vinced a detective that he was taking a nap 
in his room during the time of the murder 
committed in another part of the city. How- 
ever, the detective discovers an alarm clock in 
the murderer's apartment, still ringing, and 
still set for the time the murderer supposedly 
was taking his nap. 

Generally, this series errs on the side of 
stereotyped characterization, which is perhaps 
inevitable in such a rigid format. Also, it must 
be noted that a half-hour is too short a time 
period to develop believable characterization, 
either on radio or tv {The Whistler is also a 
syndicated tv series). 

However, it must be admitted that the inter- 
est of the listener is maintained, because one 
cannot be sure just how the murderer is going 
to get his comeuppance, although one can be 
sure that he will. 
Production costs: $2,350. 

Network: CBS Radio, Thursdays, 8-8:25 p.m. 

EST (West Coast, Sundays, 7:30-7:55 p.m. 

PST). Transcribed Hollywood origination. 
Format: Psychological drama. 
Producer: Joel Malone; director: Gordon T. 

Hughes; music conductor: Wilbur Hatch; 

writers: various. 
Sponsor: (West Coast) Lever Bros. Co. (for 

Rinso), through Ogilvy, Benson & Mather 

Inc., N. Y. 

★ ★ ★ 

BOOKS 

THIS IS EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION, by 
William Kenneth Cumming. Communica- 
tions Series, Lansing, Mich. 264 pp. $4.40. 
THOROUGH coverage of educational televi- 
sion in all its phases, including programming, 
operation of a commercial or non-commercial 
station by an educational institution, coopera- 
tion with outside commercial stations and net- 
works, administrative problems, etc., is pro- 
vided by this volume. The book is based large- 
ly on personal interviews with educators who 
have been active in tv and on the author's own 
observations as a member of the department 
of journalism of Michigan State College and 
producer-coordinator of the college's tv station, 
WKAR-TV East Lansing. 

STATISTICAL YEARBOOK (sixth issue) by 
Statistical Office of United Nations, New 
York, N. Y., 594 pp., $7.50 (clothbound), 
$6 (paperbound). 
BROADCASTERS and students of broadcast- 
ing will find particularly interesting that sec- 
tion of the Statistical Yearbook dealing with 
radio and tv stations in countries throughout 
the world and with radio and tv set ownership. 
The Yearbook estimates there are more than 
230 million radio sets in use throughout 
the world, of which more than 120 million 
are located in the U. S. and 70 million in 
Europe. In television, the U. S. is credited with 
31.5 million sets; the United Kingdom, 3.4 
million; Canada, 655,000; France, 72,000. The 
Yearbook notes that Soviet Russia claimed 
about 700,000 tv sets in January 1954. 

The range of coverage of the Yearbook can 
be suggested by the main topics, including sta- 
tistics on population, manpower, forestry, fish- 
ing, manufacturing, transport, internal trade, 
finance, national income and communications, 
among others. 




a 24-county market with 
Effective Buying Income 
of 

$1,543,515,000 

(Sales Management 1954 
Survey of Buying Power) 

NOW SHOWINGI-ALL NBC COLOR SHOWS 




Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



Interconnected 
Television Affiliate 

National Representative: 

The Headleg-Reed Compamj 



April 11, 1955 • Page 15 




There are local reasons for the consumer 

to buy one product rather than another— 
for buying in one place rather than another— 
for listening to one station rather than another. 

In Storer markets successful advertisers 
tell their stories on Storer Stations. 

n Is A Local Station/ 7 





STORER BROADCASTING COMPANY 

NATIONAL SALES HEADQUARTERS: 
TOM HARKER, V. P., National Sales Director BOB WOOD, Midwest National Sales Mgr. 

118 E. 57th St., New York 22, Eldorado 5-7690 • 230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago 1, Franklin 2-6498 



19 




Yawn Patrol 



4:45 to 6:30 AM Monday-Friday 

Stars Sell on 
Alabama's 



greatest radio station 




Happy is starting his 20th year as 
a WAPI star! On "Yawn Patrol" 
he entertains the early-rising rural 
folk with tops in folk and hillbilly 
music, gives time and weather re- 
ports, chats in his folksy manner. 
His ratings don't quite double 
those of the next station, but they're 
close! He increases his popularity. 
. . . and his value to sponsors! . . . 
by making personal appearances 
over the state. At 9 on Saturday 
nights he is joined by his Golden 
River boys for a half-hour of live 
entertainment. 

You can SELL 

Your Products 
to Alabama folks 

If you TELL 

them on programs 
they enjoy hearing 

Represented by 

John Blair & Co. 

Southeastern Representative: 

Harry Cummings 



OPEN MIKE 



Sweeney Interview 

EDITOR: 

We agree with Sweeney uimost 100% and 
are delighted with the interview feature [B»T, 
March 28] (which) provides valuable ammuni- 
tion for us. . . . Are reprints of this and the 
Georgia bank story available? 

William J. Green 
Radio-Tv Director 
Lewis Edwin Ryan Agency 
Washington, D. C. 

[EDITOR'S NOTE: Reprints of the B«T Inter- 
view with Kevin Sweeney are available at $15 
per 100, and reprints of "A Georgia Bank Banks 
on Radio" at $5 per 100, with discounts of 10% on 
orders of 1,000 or more of either article.] 

EDITOR: 

The interview you had with Kevin Sweeney, 
president of Radio Advertising Bureau [B»T, 
March 28], is terrific, tremendous, colossal, 
provocative and stimulating. Even though I 
can't agree with all of Kev's points, I think it 
is wonderful. We would like a dozen reprints. 

Simon Goldman, Pres. 
WJTN-AM-FM Jamestown, 
N. Y. 

EDITOR: 

The Kevin Sweeney B»T interview was a 
masterpiece. If available, please mail us 25 
copies. 

Cal Smith, Station Mgr. 
KROC Rochester, Minn. 

EDITOR: 

The interview with Kevin Sweeney was a 
dandy job. This format seems to make for 
absorbing reading and I hope B«T can use it 
often. 

Mitrry Harris 

Public Relations Dir. 

A. C. Nielsen Co., New York 

Who's a Dead Duck? 

EDITOR: 

It had been rumored about the country that 
radio is dying or a dead duck, particularly fm. 
About a year ago we decided to put on an fm 
classical musical station and finally Sunday, 
March 27th, we went on the air . . . From 3 p.m. 
until midnight on Sunday we received over 125 
phone calls. Monday both of our phones were 
kept busy until midnight. We received over 
350 letters and more coming in for our pro- 
gram guides. 

We really do not know what this indicates 
except, to us, that there is a listening audience, 
if we can program things that they enjoy. 
Harry Eidelman 
KCFM St. Louis 

Bobrun Broadcasts Then and Now 

EDITOR: 

I read with interest the item telling of the 
first tape-recorded broadcast of a bobrun at 
Lake Placid, N. Y., made by the sports an- 
nouncer of the Saranac Lake [WNBZ] station 
for the Bill Stern network show [B«T, March 
14]. 

I thought it might interest the younger gen- 
eration to know the first broadcast from the 
bobrun was made "live" in 1935 . . . by E. S. 
Darlington a "ham" radio operator then in my 
employ in the news bureau of General Electric. 
Pack sets were unheard of in those days. Dar- 
lington built his own in true "ham" style. It 
weighed 25 pounds. . . . 

With the pack set securely strapped to his 
back, a five-foot fishpole antenna sticking up 
in the air and microphone soldered inside a 
baseball catcher's mask, so that Darlington's 
hands could be free to hang onto the bob straps, 
the run was started. ... As I recall it, Darling- 



ton was so scared after hitting the first curve 
that most of his "description" of the ride was 
confined to "Oh boy, another curve" and "we 
got through," but he carried on to the finish 
and the few words he did say were broadcast 
by WGY. A wire line carried his words from, 
the bobrun lodge to Schenectady. . . . 

C. D. Wagoner 

(Retired from GE Publicity) 

Radio Bureau 

New York State Dept. of 
Commerce 

Albany, N. Y. 

The Carolinas 

EDITOR: 

... A fine job on the Carolinas [B«T, March. 
21] . . . and we have been mailing them out 
right and left ever since the reprints came in . . . 

Roger A. Shaffer, Mgr. 

WSPA Spartanburg, S. C. 

EDITOR: 

. . . The pieces on The South, on Georgia, 
and on the Carolinas . . . were very well done: 
and I congratulate you on them. 

James E. Gates, Dean 
College of Business 

Administration 
U. of Georgia, Athens, Ga. 

EDITOR: 

Congratulations on a fine piece of work. It 
should prove very valuable to all of us in the 
-business in these two states. 

Harold Essex, V. P., Gen. Mgr. 
WSJS-AM-TV Winston-Salem 

EDITOR: 

"... a beautifully done piece ... a gem of 
reporting." 

Charles Parker 
State Advertising Director 
North Carolina Dept. of Con- 
servation & Development 
Raleigh, N. C. 

EDITOR: 

Congratulations to you and Frank Beatty on 
the excellent story on the "Carolinas." I think 
it is the finest I have ever seen. Would you 
please send us 50 reprints on the "Carolinas" 
story? 

Charles M. Marshall 

Promotion Manager 

WSOC Charlotte, N. C. 

[EDITOR'S NOTE: Reprints of "The Carolinas" 
are available at $25 per 100 copies, with a discount 
of 10% on orders of 1,000 or more.] 

April 1st Promotion 

EDITOR: 

Here is the story of an April Fool's Day 
promotion on KDRS. 

Nobody showed up for work except the 
manager, the sales manager and the business 
manager. As far as the radio audience was 
concerned, the only broadcaster on hand for 
seven hours (5:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. was 
the manager. I was on the air alone in that 
period, including newscasts and regular two- 
man shows. 

The objective, obviously, was to set the 
town talking. It worked. By noon the town 
was buzzing and listeners were sticking extra 
close. Two members of the hospital auxiliary 
staff volunteered to appear on the community 
chatter show, Back Fence. Listeners called the 
homes of staff members to protest against the 
cruel prank. (We took the staff off the hook 
later in the day.) The whole staff appeared 
on The Roving Mike at 12:30 to celebrate their 
self-declared half holiday. 

Ted Rand, Gen. Mgr. 
KDRS Paragould, Ark. 



Page 18 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



seven, league 
boot coverage 




It takes a giant voice to cover this giant land . . . the rich 
105 counties lying between Houston . . .Waco . . . San Angelo 
. . . Del Rio . . . Brownsville. 

The powerful 50,000 watt daytime voice of KENS 680 kc. 
dominates this vast area of 109,737 square miles, and its 
population of 4,271,400 — accounting for a yearly income of 
nearly $6 billion! 

With CBS and top local programming, the accumulative 
audience of KENS shows first or in photo-finish-for-first place 
in ALL rated time segments — Pulse of San Antonio, Nov., 1954 



SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 



Ask FREE & PETERS, Inc. 
for details. 




Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 19 



Additional G-E Cameras prepare you fo 

EXPANDED SEASONAI 



Have you 
checked 
G-E color? 



Buy now for 
black & white 



modify for 
color tomorrow 




Page 20 • April 11, 1955 



▲ G-E camera above is ready for color. Note close 
similarity in size to the monochrome unit left above. 



COMPLETE TELEVISION EQUIPMENT FOR VHP and UHF 
for Black & White plus Color TV 

TRANSMITTERS powered from 100 watts to 100 kilowatts. 

ANTENNAS to fit every gain and pattern requirement— helical 
and batwing types. 

STUDIO EQUIPMENT for complete audio and video facilities. 

PORTABLE EQUIPMENT to handle all remote services. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



I 

I 



'ROGRAMMING 



offer other important advantages! 



With one or two additional G-E cameras you need 
not hesitate to expand your "live" programming 
attuned to spring. New fashion shows, extra sports cov- 
erage ( be it baseball or racing ) , special events can help 
you attract additional advertising revenue. In the studio 
or on remotes, extra cameras give you the equipment 
you need to handle this expanded programming. 

Consider also these other advantages of spare cameras: 

1. They prepare you for any unexpected camera emer- 
gency; simply roll out the spare camera. 

2. You save on overtime pay for emergency repairs. 
With extra cameras ready for use, repairs can be made 



during your regular working hours at regular pay rates. 

3. You can enjoy the benefits of a preventive mainte- 
nance program— check cameras and service them at reg- 
ular scheduled intervals, and still keep ample cameras 
operating for every "live" program. With care like this, 
your cameras last longer and assure top picture quality 
year after year. 

Let a G-E sales representative check your specific 
camera needs and suggest a plan of complete camera 
readiness for your station or network. General Electric 
Company, Broadcasting Equipment, Section X245-11, 
Electronics Park, Syracuse, N. Y. In Canada, write: 
C. G. E. Electronics, 830 Lansdowne Avenue, Toronto. 




Optimum performance per 
pound of equipment 

G-E TV PORTABLE CAMERA CHAIN 

There's amazing versatility in this lightweight chain. 
It answers almost every emergency need on remotes 
. . . fits easily into your studio layout. Available in 
from one-to-four camera chains. All units, except the 
switching and wipe units, are blower ventilated— can 
operate in high ambient temperatures. Camera, moni- 
tor, and circuitry can be modified for color. 

• FORCED AIR VENTILATION. 

• PRODUCES LAPS, FADES, WIPES, INSERTIONS. 

• COMPACT, YET EASILY ACCESSIBLE. 

• LIGHTWEIGHT SUITCASE DESIGN. 



A Depend on the G-E portable camera chain to 
deliver top picture quality in the studio, or out on 
remotes. Moving the lightweight units to remotes 
is a cinch. 

-4 Control units of portable chain are easily, 
quickly mounted on the control equipment desk. 



"Progress Is Our Most Important Product 

GENERAL® ELECTRIC 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 21 



BLANKET S 

I COVERAGE III 

II OF THE RICH II 

II FORT WAYNE II 
I TRI-STATE III 

III MARKET III 




jj! WIN-T, your station for complete jjj 

jlj coverage of the thriving 18- jjj 

II; county, tri-state market surround- jjj 

Ijj ing Fort Wayne, Indiana. Check jjj 

III these billion dollar, market facts jjj 

Ijj and figures: 

• POPULATION 722,500 

§ • HOUSEHOLDS 228,600 Jj 

• CONSUMER SPENDABLE 

INCOME $1,177,771,000 

j|j • TOTAL RETAIL SALES 
$768,150,000 



our respects 



to HERBERT JOHN YATES 



FARSIGHTED Herbert John Yates was the 
first major motion picture producer to act upon 
the potentialities of tv. He may also be the 
first to switch to tv-only production, if his re- 
marks to Republic Pictures stockholders last 
week (see story, Film Section), bear fruit. 

Five years ago the president of Republic Pic- 
tures Inc. set up Hollywood Television Service 
Inc. to engage in tv film distribution. Contrary 
to the manner in which other major studios 
have since gone about video, Republic entered 
tv film production only after the distribution 
arm was a going concern. 

With Earl R. Collins as president, Hollywood 
Tv started moving ahead in 1951 with a pack- 
age of 100 westerns and 136 features. Cur- 
rently in distribution through HTS and its 33 
branch offices are 505 features plus 39 half- 
hours in the Stories of the Century series. 

Studio City Television Productions Inc., with 
Morton W. Scott in charge, started functioning 
only last year. Its one series to date, Stories of 
the Century, received the Academy of Television 
Arts & Sciences' national "Emmy" award for 
the best western or adventure series, the only 
syndicated film package so honored. 

Studio City is readying four additional series 
for fall release by HTS. Two half-hours have 
been completed in Behind the Scenes and scripts 
are being written for Adventures of Dr. Fu 
Manchu. The latter will undoubtedly also be- 
come a transcribed radio series, Mr. Yates re- 
veals. 

He was born in Brooklyn on Aug. 24, 1880. 
At 19, while working his way through Colum- 
bia U., he became a sales executive for Amer- 
ican Tobacco Co. By the time he was 27, he 
was assistant to the vice president in charge 
of sales for Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 

Retiring from the tobacco industry in 1910, 
he got interested in motion pictures after fi- 
nancing the late Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle and 
receiving 100% profit plus his investment. 

After taking time out to lose $100,000 as a 
"gentleman farmer," he joined Hedwig Film 
Laboratories in 1915. The processing of film 
intrigued him to the point that within two 
years he felt he had acquired enough knowledge 
and self confidence to establish his own enter- 
prise, Republic Film Laboratories, New York. 
Within another year he organized Allied Film 
Laboratories Assn. and by 1922 he had devel- 
oped Consolidated Film Industries Inc. 

From his vantage point in the laboratory he 
decided the motion picture industry "was a 
fascinating business, with plenty of room for 
brains and intestinal fortitude and eternal hun- 
ger for capital to provide expansion and im- 
provement." 

Republic Pictures was born in 1935 when 
Mr. Yates engineered the merger of four inde- 




pendent producers, Liberty, Mascot, Monogram 
and Select, and took over the Mack Sennett lot 
in North Hollywood. 

Besides Republic's tv film production and 
distribution subsidiaries, the studio itself has 
made such facilities as 19 sound stages, under- 
water tank, western back lot and one of the 
two finest recording studios in the world, avail- 
able to independent tv film producers. A major 
tenant is Revue Productions, MCA's film unit. 
A further tie-up was recently effected in "the 
biggest contract of its kind in the history of 
tv" when MCA-TV acquired tv distribution 
rights to Republic's package of 67 Roy Rogers 
and 56 Gene Autry feature films. 

Republic grossed $7 million for distribution 
of features to tv during the past two years. 
Studio rentals to tv producers brought in over 
$700,000 last year. 

Consolidated Film Industries, from which 
this activity evolved, is today a division of Re- 
public Pictures with labs in Ft. Lee, N. J., and 
Hollywood, headed by Douglas T. Yates and 
Sidney P. Solow, respectively. In 1948 CFI 
processed the first west coast tv film series, 
NBC-TV's Your Showtime, produced by Mar- 
shall Grant-Realm for American Tobacco. 
Currently, approximately 85% of the labs' 
business is tv film for such clients as Revue, 
Desilu Productions, Four Star Productions, 
Gross-Krasne, Guild Films, Ziv and McCadden 
Corp. It also processes all of CBS-TV's and 
about half of NBC-TV's Hollywood films and 
kinescopes. 

Mr. Yates' foresight was again demonstrated 
in the construction of a new plant with specially 
designed equipment to handle 16mm film. It 
was conceived with Mr. Solow in advance of \ 
the actual need, but planned for the present 
emergency which has found many other labs 
reconverting 35mm space and facilities. 

Feature-wise, Republic used to be identified 
solely with westerns. Gene Autry as the first 
singing cowboy, followed by Roy Rogers and 
Rex Allen, contributed greatly to the success 
of the studio, Mr. Yates says. But, series west- 
erns were "a casualty of tv" and Republic now 
makes about 20 competitive big budget color 
features per year. 

Cited many times for his continual support 
of American ideals, he takes particular pride 
in the National Gold Citizenship Medal which 
was presented to him in 1951 by the Veterans 
of Foreign Wars for his feature film, "Red 
Menace." 

Married in 1952 to actress Vera Ralston, the 
Yates' have a home in Sherman Oaks, Calif., one 
on Long Island and an apartment in Manhattan. 
The apparently tireless Mr. Yates plays 18 
holes of golf every weekend, but Republic with J 
its subsidiaries is his vocation and avocation. 



WIN-T 

CBS and ABC for FORT WAYNE 
and the Tri State area of In- 
diana/ Ohio and Michigan. 

Nationally represented by 
H-R TELEVISION, INC. 



Page 22 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



WATE IS NOW 100,000 WATTS • FULL POWER! 




All Eyes Are 
On Knoxville 

R MARKET OF THE SOUTH 

Land of TVA power and Atomic Energy power, 
Knoxville is fast becoming most famous for the tre- 
mendous buying power of her people. 

Look at the figures : nationally, Knoxville is one of 
our 60 largest markets . . . and is growing rapidly. 
Within the State of Tennessee and the area, Knoxville 
ranks first, percentage-wise in : (1) number of married 
couples living in their own household, (2) largest num- 
ber of persons per household, (3) lowest median age of 
population, (4) largest number of industrially employed. 

Blanketing this 42-county Knoxville Market is 
WATE-TV, only VHF station in the area. It's the 
eyes and ears of sales-minded advertisers who keep 
consumer buying at record highs. There could be 
new opportunity here for you. Let us tell you the full 
story — today! 




AFFILIATED WITH NBC AND ABC • NETWORK COLOR 
REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY: AV ERY-KNODEL, INC. 




. . . with Uncommon Valor . . . 

the most powerful new film series in television 



The picture that makes these pages come alive is one of thousands just 
as exciting. In 26 half-hour programs they will soon light up the nation's 
television screens. And before the eyes of millions, the history made by 
U. S. Marines will now make history in television. 

This is the Leatherneck story. A story of America's most colorful fighting 
men ... of headquarters and foxholes ... of land, sea, and air . . . 
of unlimited drive to victory. From official film records, skilful editors 
have created a pageant of action with realism and suspense mounting 
from beginning to end. Narrator is General H. M."Howlin' Mad" Smith, 
one of World War IPs great combat leaders. 

For both stations and advertisers Uncommon Valor offers an 
uncommon opportunity to build sales, prestige, and community goodwill. 
(So popular was a comparable U. S. Navy series that it is now 
being broadcast in many markets for the fourth time.) 

Be the first in your area to attract a regular weekly audience with 
Uncommon Valor. Write for details today, or better still wire collect. 




The Film Division of General Teleradio, Inc. 
1440 Broadway, New York 18, New York 
Hollywood • Chicago • Houston • Atlanta 



to cover the 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Bay area... 




. . . use one of 
America's 2 
G R E AT independents! 

KYA 

The Personality Station 
. . . 1260 k. c. 



NEW YORK OFFICE: 

John Barry 
28 West Uth St. 
BRyant 9-6018-14 

CHICAGO OFFICE: 

George Clark 

316 N. Michigan Ave. 

RAndolph 6-0712 




PAT BROUWER 

on all accounts 

A TRANSITION from airlines to agencies and 
the buying of national spot seems to have been 
bridged with the characteristic charm attributed 
to Pat Brouwer, timebuyer at Needham, Louis 
& Brorby Inc., Chicago. 

In her present capacity at this steadily-grow- 
ing agency, with which she has been associ- 
ated for over two years, Miss Brouwer is as- 
signed to the task forces on such accounts as 
Campbell Soup Co. (pork and beans, V-8 cock- 
tail vegetable juices), Kraft Foods Co. (Parkay 
margarine, Kraft oil), Morton Salt Co., Peo- 
ples Gas Light & Coke Co., Phenix Foods Co. 
(salad dressing), Quaker Oats Co. (Ken-L-Ra- 
tion products) and Wilson & Co. (canned meats, 
Cremade soap, Jane Wilson products). 

Timebuying has been Patricia Brouwer's 
forte in Chicago agency circles since October 
1949 when she joined Grant Advertising Inc. 
as an assistant timebuyer. In January 1951 she 
moved over to Young & Rubicam's media de- 
partment in a similar capacity, remaining until 
May 1952. She joined the Needham, Louis & 
Brorby organization in November of the same 
year. 

Nine Years in Oak Park 

A native of Minneapolis (Nov. 5, 1925), Miss 
Brouwer spent most of her early life (nine years) 
in Oak Park, 111., a Chicago suburb, until she 
moved east to Syracuse, N. Y., in her high 
school sophomore year. She attended Notting- 
ham High there and later Syracuse U. for two 
years, majoring in business administration. 
From January 1946 to April 1947 Miss Brouwer 
worked for American and Northwest airlines, 
headquartering at one time in Washington, 
D. C. 

Afer a stint with Real Silk hosiery, Pat 
Brouwer joined WAGE Syracuse as a secretary, 
being associated with the station (now WHEN) 
from December 1947 to October 1949. 

It was at this point in her career that Pat 
Brouwer felt the urge to return to the familiar 
environs of the Midwest. As a result, her next 
move was to Chicago and a position at Grant 
Advertising. 

In her tenures at Grant and Young & Rubi- 
cam. Miss Brouwer worked on a variety of ac- 
counts before joining Needham, Louis & Bror- 
by. She is one of two spot timebuyers at the 
agency now. 

Pat Brouwer is an ardent worker by day and 
an enthusiastic televiewer by evening. She is 
single and lives with her mother in Evanston, 
111. Her favorite hobbies are swimming and 
horseback riding. 



to cover the 

NEW YORK 

Metropolitan area... 

...YOU owe it to 

your clients to invest 
in a station with a 
growing equity! 



D. J. AVERAGES • 



Industrials . . . I 1 ^ 
Chemicals 
Utiliti-^ UP 1 

- UP 

v up 




* of audience increase 
Monday — Saturday 
Jan. 195 J*— Jan. 1955 
based on pulse, N. Y. 



, . . use one of 
America's 2 
GREAT independents! 

WINS 



iii 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ii 



50,000 watts. . . 

,..24. hours a day 



SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE: 

Chuck Christianson 
Hotel Fairmount 
DOuglas 2-2536 

CHICAGO OFFICE: 

George Clark 

360 N. Michigan Ave. 

RAndolph 6-0712 



Page 26 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



ONLY ON 




Sound-est investment 

Only on WBT Radio can you associate for your product the 
massive, traditional selling power of "Grady Cole Time", now in 
its twenty-sixth year and stronger than ever. Grady gives each of 
his forty-six current sponsors individualized benefit of his 



8.7 average Pulse rating (5:45 to 9 a.m., Monday 

through Saturday) plus canny commercializing 
and immense influence with consumers, 

retailers and wholesalers. 

The rarity of availabilities underlines the prudence of 

regular contacts with your CBS Radio Sales man. 




For the right start 



in Color-TV. •• 

you need this RCA Test and 

Measuring Equipment "Package!" 



This indispensable package represents a basic "must" for a satisfactory 
color operation— network, film or live. You need it to check your station 
performance, maintain your broadcasting standards, assure the high- 
est quality. 

The various components of this vital "package" are pictured below. 
Charts at the right show how these units are used with relation to other 
station equipment as a means of providing complete testing facilities to 
meet various situations. 

RCA engineers — the acknowledged pioneers in the development of 
compatible color television— have spent years developing this test 
equipment which takes the guesswork out of color broadcasting. 
Already, RCA color test equipment is proving itself in nearly 100 sta- 
tions, assuring compliance with FCC standards of quality. 

The "package" represents the minimum requirements for your station. 
For peak station performance each of these items should be included. 
fn many stations the duplication of certain of the items will be desirable. 

For experienced assistance in planning the installation of this equip- 
ment to meet your individual requirements, call on your RCA Broadcast 
Sales Representative. Or write RCA Engineering Products Division, 
Camden, N. J. 



The 6 functions 
shown here repre- 
sent the testing 
facilities required 
to attain and 
maintain the 
highest standards 
in color operation 




RCA PIONEERED AND DEVELOPED COMPATIBLE COLOR TELEVISION 

RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 



ENGINEERING PRODUCTS DIVISION 



CAMDEN, N.J. 



You will need 
all of these 
5 instruments 
for color test and\ 
measurement. . . 




LINEARITY CHECKER 

WA-7B 




COLOR SIGNAL ANALYZER 



W A-6 A 



Linearity Checker and 
Oscilloscope test for 
differential gain. 



LINEARITY 
CHECKER 



SYSTEM 
UNDER TEST 



CATHODE RAY 
OSCILLOSCOPE 








Addition of Color Sig- 
nal Analyzer makes it 
possible to check dif- 
ferential gain and dif- 
ferential phase. 



© 



Burst-Controlled Oscil- 
lator must be added to 
check differential gain 
and phase at remote lo- 
cations where studio 
sub-carrier is not avail- 
able. 



LINEARITY 
CHECKER 



COLOR SIGNAL 
ANALYZER 



IONG LINE OR 
LARGE SYSTEM 
UNDER TEST 



L 



COLOR SIGNAL 
ANALYZER 



SU8CARRIER 



BURST CONTROLLED 
OSCILLATOR 



I SCOPE SYNC 



© 



Grating and Dot Gen- 
erator checks converg- 
ence and deflection lin- 
earity of monitors. Its 
signal can also be used 
for checking house 
monitoring systems. 







The Color Bar Gener- 
ator shown is used with 
origination equipment 
for supplying test sig- 
nal to system. The Col- 
or Bar Generator in 
conjunction with the 
Color Signal Analyzer 
is used for precise 
alignment of the Color- 
plexer. 



© 



Integrated Test Equip- 
ment System for color 
broadcasting. This in- 
cludes all situations de- 
picted above. 



" 

GRATING & DOT 




COLOR 


GENERATOR 


> 


MONITOR 



DRIVING SIGNALS 



COLOR BAR 
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COLOR SLIDE SCANNER 
FILM CHAIN 
LIVE CAMERA 



FREQUENCY 
STANDARD 




COLORPLEXER 



COLOR SIGNAL 
ANALYZER 



BURST FLAG 
GENERATOR 



COLOR BAR 
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Mi' 




BURST-CONTROLLED 
OSCILLATOR 

WA-4 A 



j» $ % m $ 

9 • * • * 



GRATING AND 
DOT GENERATOR 

WA-3B 



* 



COLOR BAR GENERATOR 

WA-1D 




KWKH 



(SHREVEPORT) 



EVEN FLOODS 



INTO 



LaTEST Hoopers show KWKH favored over the 
second station . . . morning, noon and night 
— up to 104%! Yet, the 50,000-watt power 
of KWKH gives you tremendously more 
than Metropolitan Shreveport . . . 

Nearly 85% of our coverage is in places like Water 
Proof, Louisiana (pop. 420) — just one of 
hundreds of towns and villages in our 80- 
county daytime SAMS area. Actually, 
KWKH delivers 22.3% more daytime 
homes than all six other Shreveport sta- 
tions combined! 

Get all the facts from The Branham Company. 



ARKANSAS 



55 5< J it 



TEXAS 



»7 I II \ U 1 23 



\ l 36 \ n 



V\T »» J \ 39 ( 59 / 7 22 1 



LOUISIANA 



KWKH 

A Shreveport Times Station 
I TEXAS 



SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 



ARKANSAS 



The Branham Co. 
Representatives 



Nearly 2 million people live within the KWKH daytime SAMS 
area. (The area includes additional counties in Texas, 
Oklahoma, New Mexico and Mississippi not shown on map.) 



50,000 Watts • CBS Radio 



Henry Clay 
General Manager 



Fred Watkins 
Commercial Manager 



l 



BROADCASTING 
TELECASTING 



April 11, 1955 Vol. 48, No. 15 



SUBSCRIPTION TELEVISION: 
THE DEBATE GETS HOTTER 



COMMENTS SNOWBALL AT FCC— ZENITH CANCELS CBS PROGRAM 



CANCELLED CONTRACTS and violent argu- 
ment developed last week as the fight to change 
American telecasting by allowing pay-to-see 
services developed into a major national con- 
j troversy. 

With the deadline for FCC comments just 
four weeks away, the Commission already has 
received more public reaction than any tv issue 
has aroused since the 1950 cplor hearings. 

Principal developments last week were: 

• Zenith Radio Corp. charged CBS-TV with 
censoring its April 3 Omnibus commercials pro- 
moting subscription tv. 

• Accordingly, Zenith said it was cancelling 
its April 10 sharing of Omnibus, last program 
of the season. 

• CBS flatly denied censorship, saying Ze- 
nith was trying to deviate from the contract. 

• CBS said it would insist on getting paid 
for the April 10 Omnibus; it charged Zenith 
with "outrageously" inaccurate statements. 

• Analysis of comments at FCC showed an 
approximate split (185 for pay-see, 175 against). 

• The total (360 comments) exceeds a nor- 
mal one-year FCC supply for a single issue; 
most of the comments take a strong stand one 
way or the other. 

Fiercest exchange of the week was between 
Joseph S. Wright, Zenith vice president and 
general counsel, who wrote an indignant letter 
to Dr. Frank Stanton, CBS Inc. president, and 
Richard S. Salant, CBS vice president and gen- 
eral executive, who replied to the Wright letter. 

Answering Mr. Wright's charges in connec- 
tion with refusal to accept a subscription tv 
commercial on the April 3 Omnibus, Mr. Salant 
explained that Zenith had been advised the 
copy would be rejected under contract terms 
limiting commercials to goods and services. He 
added that CBS policy limits discussion of 
controversial issues to programs designated for 
that purpose. 

First comments received by the FCC from 
the public ran 2-to-l against subscription tv, 
following the Feb. 10 call for views [B»T, Feb. 
14]. After early March, however, the pro-pay 
- forces began to make themselves heard at the 
FCC — and in quantity. 

A review of correspondence sent to the Com- 



mission makes two things clear. The more 
articulate correspondents — and based on the 
bond note paper and more educated expression, 
the higher income group — are favorable to pay- 
tv. The less articulate, writing on ruled, cheaper 
paper and on postcards, are against subscription 
tv. 

As might be expected, the few broadcasters 
who already have expressed their views are — 
with one exception — in favor of pay-tv. These 
are KSAN-TV San Francisco, ch. 32; KCEB 
(TV) Tulsa, Okla., ch. 23, now off the air, and, 
surprisingly, KONA (TV) Honolulu, ch. 11. 
Lorrin P. Thurston, chairman of KONA, sug- 
gested a dual system of subscription tv and 
free tv for stations. Also in favor is WBBB 



LETTER WRITERS 




MR. WRIGHT MR. SALANT 



CBS maintains Wright is wrong 

Burlington, N. C. Only station opposing was 
KGFF Shawnee, Okla. Both of the last two 
are am stations. 

A couple of Wyoming broadcast employes 
wrote in asking whether they can apply for 
Casper ch. 6 for subscription tv. They asked 
that their letter be kept confidential. 

It will be recalled that heavy support for 
subscription tv came last year from a group 
of uhf stations, which saw the income from 
toll-tv as a help in overcoming uhfs financial 
straits. 

Also favorable to pay-tv is a Nevada contin- 
gent including Gov. Charles H. Russell, Sen. 



George W. Malone and Rep. Cliff Young, both 
Republicans. 

Many physicians have written in favoring 
the pay principle. The Assn. of American 
Medical Colleges expressed its belief that sub- 
scription tv could have serious "potential" 
value for doctors' training. 

Among the advocates of pay tv who have ex- 
pressed themselves in writing are the president 
of the Pittsburgh Steelers football team and 
playwright Philip Dunning. 

The opposition correspondents make much 
of the fact that tv is free to low income fam- 
ilies who cannot afford to pay for their en- 
tertainment. Also referred to are the plight of 
shut-ins, pensioners and others on fixed incomes. 

Their opposition is sometimes expressed 
vividly. Words like "violently opposed," "un- 
American and monopolistic," "criminal scheme 
from Moscow," and "communistic herring" 
are expressions that crop up in some of the 
letters. 

Not many theatre owners have written in 
yet, but the few that have are apparently using 
a mimeographed form letter, the salient por- 
tion of which reads as follows: 

"It is the writer's considered opinion that 
such special interest shows and sporting events, 
as would normally be presented over this type 
of service, would find their best outlet in the- 
atres and public places. Such enterprises can 
best afford, through admission charges, equip- 
ment capable of presenting such events in a 
manner worthy of paid viewing. 

"It further seems that home presentation 
of such programs will tend to syphon off the 
best of available material from free broad- 
casts, leaving only such material as to make 
these broadcasts hardly worth watching. 

"It also seems that 'pay-as-you-view' tele- 
vision would tend to encourage monopolistic 
practices by the organizations owning the co- 
axial cable network." 

One theatreman, however, doesn't seem to 
share his colleagues views on pay-tv. He 
asked for information getting FCC-approved 
franchises for pay-tv. He also offered to come 
to Washington to help the FCC make up its 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 31 



mind, based on more than 30 years of theatre 
ownership and management. 

Many letter-writers take broadcasters, net- 
works and advertisers to task for trying to 
squeeze more income from viewers. 

One opposition came from a Frank A. Sause, 
who signed himself executive vice president of 
the National Assn. of Tv Advertisers, Glens 
Falls, N. Y. 

In one letter, a Hollywood resident proposed 
that subscription tv be permitted for stations 
transmitting 1,000-line pictures. This would 
give so much more detail than the standard 525 
lines, he said, that a lot of people would be glad 
to pay for it. 

Separate Channel 

Another proponent qualified his enthusiasm 
by advocating a "separate channel" for subscrip- 
tion tv, so "we can continue to enjoy spon- 
sored tv." 

As the May 9 deadline for comments draws 
near, it can be assumed that more and more 
expressions will be received from the viewing 
public. If they follow the pattern indicated so 
far, there is going to be a stand off as far as 
the public's attitude toward this new method 
of broadcasting is concerned. 

Mr. Wright's letter to Dr. Stanton, voicing 
the Zenith complaint, charged CBS with "arbi- 
trary and unwarranted censorship" and added, 
". . . for that reason we refused to participate 
in the program of April 3, and ask that our 
name not be used in any way in connection 
with the forthcoming Omnibus program of 
April 10, 1955." He said Zenith felt the pub- 
lic has a right to be informed about this sub- 
ject (subscription tv). The letter continued: 

"Some months ago you refused to permit an 
impartial forum discussion of subscription tele- 
vision over your station WBBM-TV in Chicago, 
and on March 27, 1955, you presented on 
Omnibus a program on subscription television 
which was unfairly slanted to create an un- 
favorable reaction on a program which we 
sponsored and over our objections to same. 

"In view of press reports that you intend to 
oppose subscription television because of its 
possible effect upon your present competitive 
position, we protest your refusal to permit a 
fair presentation of the subject over your facili- 
ties, either in a pro-and-con discussion or in 
our own paid commercial." 

Here is the text of Zenith's proposed com- 
mercial: 

"Have you ever wondered why you never 
see a first run Hollywood movie or new Broad- 
way play on your home television set? Have 
you wondered why certain heavyweight cham- 
pionship fights are no longer on home tv? 

"The answer is simple! 

"Advertising sponsors of the home tv you 
now enjoy simply cannot pay the price to 
bring you first run Hollywood movies, Broad- 
way plays, and many other big box office 
events. But there is a way for you to get this 
great entertainment in addition to the fine fare 
you now enjoy on home tv. Subscription tele- 
vision can bring you on the same screen you 
are now watching programs not now available 
on an advertising-sponsored station. Subscrip- 
tion television has been perfected and is now 
ready to serve you all the world's great box 
office entertainment. You would have the op- 
portunity, if you chose, to pay a small fee to 
see these great events without the inconvenience 
of leaving your home, and at a fraction of the 
present box office cost. 

"Subscription television would supplement 
the present programming and provide an extra 



and optional service which you would use only 
as you wanted and when you wanted it. 

"The Federal Communications Commission 
in Washington, D. C, wants to find out whether 
it would be in the public interest to approve 
subscription television as a supplement to pres- 
ent broadcasting. 

"The Commission has asked all interested 
persons to send them comments on or before 
May 9, 1955. Are you interested? 

"For further information, write Zenith Ra- 
dio Corporation, Chicago 39, Illinois — who 
brought you this announcement in the public 
interest." 

Mr. Salant's reply follows: 
Dear Joe: 

I am replying to your letter of April 4, ad- 
dressed to Dr. Stanton, and relating to CBS 
Television's refusal to accept certain controver- 
sial advertising copy submitted by Zenith for 
use in connection with the April 3 broadcast of 
Omnibus. In your letter you have taken a posi- 
tion which I believe to be wholly wrong and you 
have made some important errors of fact: 

1. As you have already been notified by wire 
from Mr. William H. Hylan, regardless of your 
non-participation in the April 3 and 10 Omnibus 
broadcasts, we look to you for payments for 
both broadcasts. 

2. You are in error in alleging that our re- 
fusal to accept the commercial continuity which 
was submitted by you for the Omnibus program 
of April 3 was an arbitrary and unwarranted 
censorship on our part or that it stemmed from 
our intent to oppose subscription television. 
The proposed commercial copy which dealt 
solely with advocacy of subscription television 
was a violation of the contract between CBS 



Television and Zenith covering its co-sponsor- 
ship of Omnibus. Paragraph 2 of the contract 
explicitly provides: | 
"Products or services. The broadcast 
time period shall be used for the adver- 
tising of the following products and/ or 
services of advertisers, and for no other 
product, service or purpose without prior i 
notice to and approval by CBS Television." 
Further, by letter of Oct. 22, 1954, your 
advertising agency, in placing its order for Ze- 
nith's participation in Omnibus, expressly stated: 
"It is understood the products which may 
be advertised during the Zenith portion of 
the program will include radio and televi- 
sion receivers, phonographs, and hearing 
aids." 

Violates CBS Policy 

The proposed copy did not deal with a prod- ! 
uct at all, hence it was excluded from the con- 
tract. Further, as both Dr. Stanton and I per- 
sonally advised you in another connection on 
Friday, March 25, it is a fixed policy of CBS 
not to permit commercials dealing with con- 
troversial public issues to be broadcast in the 
course of an entertainment, news or other pro- 
gram not specifically devoted to discussion of 
such issues. As we explained to you, this is a 
uniform policy which we have invoked in a 
number of instances. We believe that such a 
policy is distinctly in the public interest and 
that for many reasons it is highly undesirable 
to intersperse in the form of commercials a 
sponsor's views on controversial issues in the 
course of programs other than those designed 
for such a purpose. You in no way indicated 
any disagreement with that policy even though 



GRASS ROOTS COMMENTS 



HERE are some samples of the type of 
letters the FCC has been receiving on the 
question of subscription tv: 

Portland, Ore. — Sir: Whats the matter 
with you birds. Where do you think the 
average guy is going to get the dough? 
He won't pay for toll tv. Any blockhead 
should be able to see its just another sucker- 
play. The T.V. sponsors and stations are 
making a mint now getting rich. 

Yours disgustedly, 

Millbrae, Calif. — Gentlemen: "Public 
Asked to Speak Up on 'Pay-TV'," says my 
morning Chronicle. 

This is just what I have been wanting to 
do — speak up for opportunity to have the 
choicest entertainment in my home. Please 
put this family on record as HEARTILY 
FAVORING PAY TV. 

I have long followed the efforts of Zenith 
and others, and wish you would give them 
a chance to demonstrate. 

Considering what many families now pay 
for entertainment plus the considerable in- 
vestment in radio and tv in the home, plus 
regular maintenance expense and monthly 
power bills, YOU WILL DO SOMETHING 
FOR THE AMERICAN FAMILY AND 
THEIR FRIENDS by letting us subscribe to 
superior entertainment in our homes. 

Please do not think of the "great Ameri- 
can public" — there isn't any. We are a lot 
of American minorities in our tastes, edu- 
cational backgrounds, and ambitions in 
life. Give us more stations, greater variety 



of programs, encourage producers to give 
repetitions of their best shows. We want 
more OMNIBUS, and NBC TV WORK- 
SHOP productions. This family is willing 
to pay for the product by direct charge. 
Cordially, 

* * * * ***** 

Pittsburgh — Gentlemen: As my friends 
and I have read in the newspaper that the 
Television people is trying to get coin 
boxes in homes to see television — and collect 
for same, will state that we are not going to 
have such a system in our homes, as we pre- 
fer the nice commercials that go with the 
programs. And what is wrong in the spon- 
sors selling their merchandise? Many items 
I saw commercialized on T.V. I purchased 
as I did not know of them before, nor 
my friends. In fact, they giving us nice pro- 
grams induced us to purchase their products 
— so why now must we consider the slot ma- 
chines and have collectors pick up coins 
from our homes for entertainment. If I wish 
to see some large productions it is wonder- 
full to dress andgo to the theatre for such 
entertainment. 

So please do not pass such a coin box slot 
machine idea off on the public — let the 
theatre people own the larger productions 
and earn a livelihood too. 

We pay enough for a Television set in 
our homes and wish to enjoy it as we like — 
notas the money mongers want us to do. 

Yours truly, 

********* 



Page 32 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



ADVERTISERS & AGENCIES 



now you characterize it as an act of censorship 
or bad faith. 

3. We did not refuse to permit "an impartial 
forum discussion of subscription television" over 
WBBM-TV in Chicago. That episode, which 
occurred in November of last year, was not a 
result of company policy and was at most a 
matter of misunderstanding. 

4. You are outrageously and knowingly 
wrong in your statement that "on March 27, 
1955 you (CBS) presented on Omnibus a pro- 
gram on subscription television which was un- 
fairly slanted to create an unfavorable reaction 
on a program which we (Zenith) sponsored and 
over our (Zenith's) objections to same." This 
matter was fully discussed with you on March 
25. We explicitly asked you, after you had 
seen the proposed copy which had been prepared 
and provided by the Ford Foundation's Tv- 
Radio Workshop, producers of Omnibus, 
whether you wanted to take the position that 
the segment dealing with subscription television 
should be deleted from Omnibus. You took the 
position that you did not want to ask for its 
omission. On the contrary, you discussed with 
me certain changes which you wished to make 
in the copy to which you objected. In your 
presence I called Mr. Robert Saudek, director 
of the Tv-Radio Workshop, and Mr. Saudek 
agreed to make every one of the changes which 
you suggested. 

You are completely in error when you state 
that the program "was unfairly slanted to create 
an unfavorable reaction." The clear facts are 
that there were two spokesmen in favor of sub- 
scription television on this program, one spokes- 
man who could be characterized as a neutral 
in his comments, and one spokesman, Mr. 
George Storer, who was opposed to subscription 
television. The quality of the sound in that 
portion of the program devoted to Mr. Storer's 
remarks was inferior and difficult to understand. 
As a result of this unfortunate operational 
error, if the program was unfair at all it was 
unfair to the opponents and not to the pro- 
ponents of subscription television. In fact, one 
group opposing subscription television, the Com- 
mittee Against Pay-As-You-See Television, vig- 
orously and publicly protested that the program 
was indeed unfair to them. 

5. Your charge that we have refused to permit 
a fair presentation of subscription television 
over CBS facilities "either in a pro-and-con dis- 
cussion or in our (Zenith's) own paid commer- 
cial" is unjustified. As you must know from 
detailed reports in the trade press, Dr. Stanton 
informed Philip F. Harling of the Committee 
Against Pay-As- You-See Television, in a wire on 
March 29, 1955, that CBS "proposes on some 
Sunday shortly after April 10, during the period 
now occupied by Omnibus, to devote a full pro- 
gram period of one-half or an hour to a more 
comprehensive discussion of the entire issue of 
subscription television." Our plans for this 
program are now actively proceeding. 

It should be stated for the record that I wholly 
disagree with your characterization of Zenith's 
proposed commercial as "a fair presentation" of 
the issues; any examination of the proposed 
commercial establishes that it was solely devoted 
to the pro's of subscription television with no 
reference to any con's. 

Sincerely, 

(Signed) Richard S. Salant 
(CBS Vice President and 
General Executive) 



COTY SUES REVLON, WEINTRAUB, CBS; 
CHARGES THEFT OF TV COMMERCIAL COPY 

But Hazel Bishop states 'Wake Up Beautiful' copy theme was created 
for its lipstick, not Coty's nor Revlon's, in 1950. 



COTY Inc. cosmetic firm, a tv spot advertiser, 
has filed a federal civil suit against Revlon 
Products Corp. (network and spot advertiser), 
William H. Weintraub & Co. and CBS, charging 
false representation, copyright infringement and 
misappropriation of advertising material in its 
tv commercials. 

The action, filed last Thursday in the United 
States District Court, Southern District of New 
York, alleges misuse of a trademark, "Wake Up 
Beautiful," the advertising theme and claims 
embodied in the current advertising and sales 
campaign to introduce Coty "24," an "entirely 
new type" of lipstick. 

Norman B. Norman, vice president and ac- 
count executive on Revlon at the William H. 
Weintraub agency, told B®T that there was "no 
truth" in the charges and he denied "each and 
every one of the allegations." 

Julius F. Brauner, secretary of CBS, explained 
that the network had not been served with the 
papers and therefore could not make a state- 
ment. 

A spokesman for Hazel Bishop Inc., one of 
the largest tv advertisers in the cosmetic field, 
stated that, although it would not discuss the 
merits of Coty's lawsuit against Revlon, Hazel 
Bishop Inc. had advised Coty that Bishop's ad- 
vertising agency, Raymond Spector, had origi- 
nated this very campaign idea in 1950 and con- 
tinued to work on it continuously ever since. 
The Hazel Bishop spokesman claimed it was 
strange that the very same caption and much 
of the copy that appears in the Coty campaign 
had been prepared by the Spector agency as 
early as 1951 and 1952. These all included the 
phrase "wake up in the morning beautiful." The 
Hazel Bishop spokesman also said it was well 
known for some time in various circles that 
Hazel Bishop Inc. intended to promote this 



benefit which could be achieved by users of 
Hazel Bishop Long-Lasting Lipstick. 

The Coty suit against Revlon charged that, 
after Coty began its campaign in January of 
this year, Revlon, aided by the co-defendants, 
began in March to use the same theme and 
claims to promote a standard Revlon product 
for which no new features had previously been 
claimed. 

"Wake Up Beautiful," Coty's companion 
trademark to "24," has allegedly been misap- 
propriated by Revlon. The complaint char- 
acterizes Coty "24" as the longest wearing lip- 
stick offered for sale in the United States and 
"the only lipstick which forms a thin coloration 
that becomes bonded to the lips." 

"Said lipstick has the unique characteristic 
that when applied in the evening it may be re- 
moved with soap or cream before retiring and 
permits the user thereof to awaken in the morn- 
ing with alive color on her lips," the complaint 
states. It alleges further that Revlon has made 
false claims for its lipstick, "which is the same 
lipstick without any change in formula which 
defendant Revlon has been selling for years and 
the color of said lipstick will not stay upon the 
lips for any appreciable length of time after 
normal removal of the lipstick itself." 

Coty officials said tests lasting many months 
and involving the participation of 6,000 women 
were conducted to verify the unique characteris- 
tics of Coty "24" before the product was 
introduced. 

"Obviously, Coty sustains a heavy loss 
through competition of this kind," Philip Cort- 
ney, Coty president, said. "Of equal importance, 
however, are the underlying issues which this 
case poses, and the losses which the entire in- 
dustry can suffer from them. If practices such 
as we cite here were to spread very far in the 




AT a news conference announcing the June 5 entry into network radio by F. W. 
Woolworth Co. (dime stores), which will sponsor a new full-hour musical series on CBS 
Radio, are (I to r) Adrian Murphy, president of CBS Radio; Percy Faith, musical conductor 
of The Woolworth Hour; E. C. Burman, Woolworth Co. advertising director; Rae C. Mc- 
Laren, Woolworth vice president, and Macdonald Carey, host of the upcoming program. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 33 



FASHION EXPERTS PLAN RADIO-TV USE 



nation's trade channels, the result would be 

chaos. 

"No industry could hold the confidence and 
good will of the consumer if the bars of com- 
petitive ethics were suddenly lowered to coun- 
tenance actions which were considered unsound 
and illegal decades ago. The unwritten, as well 
as the written, laws of integrity and fair dealing 
which prevail in an industry are vital to con- 
sumer protection. Despite all the safeguards 
erected by federal regulation, the responsibility 
for honest representation of a product's prop- 
erties will forever rest primarily with the 
manufacturer. 

"A major question here, it seems to me, is 
whether busines will continue to move forward 
in its bid for public confidence or return to the 
dark ages of dog-eat-dog competition. We can- 
not have orderly progress in any industry if 
innovators and investors can so easily be de- 
prived of the fruits of their enterprise." 

Examples of Revlon's alleged misuse of Coty's 
copyrighted material were filed as exhibits to 
the complaint, including excerpts from the com- 
mercial films on Danger and the Jack Paar Show 
on CBS-TV. 

Revlon Footsteps Covered 

Mr. Cortney said at a news conference, held 
Thursday morning at New York's Biltmore 
Hotel to announce the law suit, that originally 
Coty planned to concentrate in 50 television 
markets but after a few weeks was forced to 
appropriate an additional $250,000 to expand to 
areas where Revlon had entered. He said that 
Revlon claims of lipstick color lasting overnight 
were untrue; that the first thing the consumer 
would discover was that it was not true, and 
that then Coty had to follow in those areas 
where the consumer had lost confidence because 
of Revlon's claims. 

Mr. Cortney also said that he tried to avoid 
a law suit and took three steps to prevent it: 
( 1 ) that he called Charles Revson, president of 
Revlon Products, and told him about the copy 
and Mr. Revson promised to check and call 
back but never did, (2) that Mr. Cortney in- 
formed the Toilet Goods Assn. which wrote 
to the agency and the sponsor but felt it could 
not police the industry and (3) that he went 
to the Better Business Bureau which also drew 
attention to the matter. 

The suit is a civil action. "The amount 
in controversy, exclusive of interest and costs, 
exceeds the value of $3,000" the complaint 
states. In effect, it was said, the suit is not for 
the monetary value but for injunction purpose. 

Spokesmen for Revlon Friday categorically 
denied all the allegations. 

Pulse N. Y. Survey Shows 
Minorities 62% of Residents 

SURVEY conducted in January by Pulse Inc., 
New York, for the Joseph Jacobs organization, 
advertising and public relations firm, has re- k 
vealed that Jewish, Italian, Negro and Puerto 
Rican residents of New York comprise 62% 
of the city's total population. 

Pulse estimates were based on interviews with 
1,585 housewives in the five boroughs of the 
city. Dr. Sydney Roslow, director of Pulse, 
said that the findings "underline the need for 
special advertising and sales approaches to sell 
each of these markets within America's largest 
market." 

The survey was part of the "Inventory of 
Food & Drug Products" conducted annually 
since 1944. The information relating to trends 
in product usage and brand preference in the 
food and drug field will be released shortly, 
Dr. Roslow said. 



New York group of designers 
plans $6 million center fully- 
equipped for national broad- 
casting-telecasting of new cre- 
ations. Seasonal time buys 
also contemplated. 

LEADERS of New York's apparel and fashion 
industries met last week at the Waldorf-Astoria 
for a glimpse into radio-tv plans aimed at main- 
taining the city's leadership in the world of de- 
signs and creations. 
At the meeting, it was revealed : 

• By the middle of 1956, a $6 million, 10- 
story fashion center will be built at an un- 
specified location north of New York's garment 
district and south of the city's new Coliseum 
now under construction at Columbus Circle. 
Part of the structure's fifth floor will be devoted 
to a radio-tv control center, fully-equipped for 
nationwide broadcasting. 

• Once this building is up, the industry will 
look to nationwide tv timebuying on what is 
likely to be a seasonal basis. 

The latter plan, when it was unveiled at the 
meeting, reportedly was met with a response 
indicating that the top garment makers would 
be willing to enter into such a national project. 

The key to tv plans is in the proposed build- 
ing itself. 

The center will be financed through bond 
issues sold to members of the garment industry 
in $1,000 to $5,000 units per member. At first, 
the fashion center will be limited to 3,000 
members who represent about 17% of the 
17,800 firms allied with the fashion industry in 
New York. 

According to Joseph Love, operator of Joseph 



Love Inc., New York, maker of children's 
dresses, and spokesman for the project, $250,- 
000 already has been pledged by his industry. 

In the tentative plans for the center, de- 
signed by Sydney Goldstone, New York archi- 
tect, are a facade of limestone, aluminum and 
glass, and facilities for all members of the 
fashion industries, including firms dealing in 
men's, women's and children's clothing and 
accessories. A 2,000-seat auditorium, lounges, 
private dining rooms, headquarters for out-of- 
town press representatives (including radio-tv), 
a museum of fashion, a fashion library and a 
Fashion Hall of Fame, are in the plans. 

Private Showings 

Still other rooms, in addition to the audi- 
torium, will be equipped for private showings, 
which, according to Mr. Goldstone, could be 
arranged for radio-tv pickup, channeled through 
the control center. 

According to the building's planners, this 
"super show case" for New York fashion would 
contain "all the facilities required to set forth 
New York fashions in a glamorous manner in 
order that their style messages may reach all 
parts of the country as quickly and efficiently 
as possible." 

Mr. Love sees varied uses of the building's 
radio-tv facilities. In addition to regular time- 
buying on a seasonal pattern for national 
showings (assuming that the project's fathers 
would approve a budget), tie-ups with regular 
network programs would be sought and other 
promotional or merchandising plans could be 
formed. 

The idea of the building also is to establish 
a fashion hookup with conventions being held 
in the new Coliseum. Regular tie-in programs 



Network Feb. Gross 17.5% Over Feb. '54 



ABC* 
CBS 
MBS 
NBC 



Total 



ABC 
CBS 
DuM 
NBC 



COMBINED gross time 
sales of tv and radio net- 
works in February, to- 
taling $41,298,379, gained 
17.5% above the Febru- 
ary 1954 total, according 
to Publishers Information 
Bureau computations. 

A slightly less drastic 
drop was noted in net- 
work radio when compar- 
ing February with the 
same month last year, and 
also last January com- 
pared with January 1954. 
February decline of the 
four radio networks was 
16.7% compared to 
18.8% off in January 
[B«T, March 14]. 

In tv, the networks 
combined grossed 35.7% 
more in February than in 
the corresponding month 
last year. Individually, 
all the tv networks, ex- 
cept one, were up sub- 
stantially. 

Total January-February gross billings for 
the network: radio— $20,947,920 in 1955 
compared to $25,490,176 in 1954; television 
—$64,598,395 in 1955 compared to $48,- 



February 
1955 
$ 2,335,414 
3,950,767 
1,291,938 
2,584,620 

$10,162,739 



NETWORK RADIO 

February 
1954 
$ 2,494,737 
4,749,512 
1,783,452 
3,176,849 

$12,204,550 



Jan. -Feb. 
1955 
$ 4,822,554 
8,132,072 
2,664,470 
5,328,824 

$20,947,920 



NETWORK TELEVISION 



Total 



Jan. 
Feb. 
Total 



Jan. 
Feb. 
Total 



$ 3,567,696 
14,694,726 
597,275 
12,275,843 

$31,135,540 



$ 2,502,372 
9,965,481 
1,108,157 
9,368,148 

$22,944,158 



$ 7,285,891 
30,525,867 
1,321,235 
25,465,402 

$64,598,395 



Jan. -Feb. 
1954 
$ 5,325,391 
9,915,686 
3,680,377 
6,568,722 

$25,490,176 



$ 5,282,946 
20,678,810 
2,553,765 
19,485,085 

$48,000,606 



NETWORK RADIO TOTALS TO DATE 

ABC CBS MBS NBC TOTAL 

$2,487,140 $4,181,305 $1,372,532 $2,744,204 $10,785,181 

2,335,414 3,950,767 1,291,938 2,584,620 10,162,739 

$4,822,554 $8,132,072 $2,664,470 $5,328,824 $20,947,920 

NETWORK TELEVISION TOTALS TO DATE 

ABC CBS DuM NBC TOTAL 

$3,718,195 $15,831,141** $ 723,960 $13,189,559** $33,462,855** 

3,567,696 14,694,726 597,275 12,275,843 31,135,540 

$7,285,891 $30,525,867 $1,321,235 $25,465,402 $64,598,395 



* In order to maintain continuity and comparability with previously pub- 
lished data, an adjustment factor of 1.817 has been used by P. I. B. in 
calculating gross network radio time charges for those nighttime network 
radio programs where ABC Rate Card No. 6 was in effect. 
** Revised as of 4/4/55. 

000,606 in 1954. For the first two months 
comparison, this roughly comes to some $4.5 
million down in radio but about $16.4 mil- 
lion up in television. 



Page 34 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



would be initiated at the center for the women 
attending the convention — auxiliaries and other 
women's organizations. Highlights of these 
shows also could be televised. 

At last week's meeting, New York's Mayor 
Robert Wagner said he had indorsed the idea 
of a fashion center, and that when plans are 
set, the city would help by offering technical 
assistance and, if possible, reduce the cost by 
purchasing land as it did in the case of the 
Coliseum. 

NEHI SERIES SET 
FOR 193 STATIONS 

Other big buys made last 
week by Florists' Telegraph, 
G&D Wines, Wax Paper Mer- 
chandising Council, Peerless 
Corp. and Brioschi. 

NEHI Corp. (Royal Crown Cola), Columbus, 
Ga., will sponsor a quarter-hour tv series on 
more than 193 stations, one of the largest 
quarter-hour spot campaigns placed in televi- 
sion and lead- 
ing several 
other advertis- 
ers in spot and 
participation 
buys last week. 

Other adver- 
t i s e r s were 
Florists' Tele- 
graph Delivery 
Assn., G&D 
wines, Brioschi, 
Wax Paper 
Merchandising 
Council and 
Peerless Corp. 

N e h i will 
sponsor the 
Ames Brothers 
in a weekly miniature musical tv series entitled 
The Ames Brothers, starting on varied dates 
during April, on 193 stations. The show is a 
quarter-hour musical comedy, produced by Re- 
vue Productions. Commercials have been done 
by Joan Benny, who uses an informal approach, 
and draws rather freely on mentions of her 
father, comedian Jack Benny. BBDO, New 
York, is the agency. 

Gambarelli & Davitto (G&D wines), 
through Honig-Cooper Co., San Francisco, 
is placing a spot campaign directed toward Ital- 
ian-American audiences. The spots feature 
Lido Belli and were produced by Empire Film 
Production Corp., New York. 

Brioschi (anti-acid) effective April 8 started 
a radio spot announcement campaign using 
over 80 one-minute spots per week in the New 
York metropolitan market in an attempt to 
become a New York-known trade name. It 
is the advertiser's largest campaign. David J. 
Mahoney Inc., New York, is agency. 

Wax Paper Merchandising Council is spend- 
ing $50,000 in an advertising test in Philadel- 
phia with approximately $25,000 going into 
radio and television starting April 18. If suc- 
cessful, the test will be explained. Ruthrauff & 
Ryan, Chicago, is placing campaign. 

Florists' Telegraph Delivery Assn. and Inter- 
flora, New York, will expand their all-time- 
high advertising program using a spot radio and 
television campaign before Easter and Mother's 
Day. In addition to spots, the firm through 
its agency, Grant Adv., New York, has bought 
participations on Today, Home and Tonight, 
all on NBC-TV. 

FTD, an association of 10,000 U. S. and Ca- 




MISS BENNY 



nadian florists who send flowers by wire, re- 
ports that sales are 6.7% above the same period 
last fiscal year. Interflora, with an additional 
8,000 retail florists around the world, reports 
sales increases of over 20%. Easter, Mother's 
Day and Christmas are the three biggest floral 
holidays. 

Peerless Corp. (Broil-Quick broiler-rotis- 
series), through Hicks & Greist, is so satisfied 
with the sales results achieved through its par- 
ticipations on the Steve Allen Tonight show on 
NBC-TV that it has become the first charter 
member to renew its contract, Max Steinbook, 
president, announced last week. 

Mr. Steinbook revealed that evidence of Mr. 
Allen's ability to create consumer demand for 
a product was found in markets where Broil- 
Quick was advertised only on the tv show. 
Consumer demand for the company's appli- 
ances in these markets was, at times, higher 
than in areas supported by other media. 

The new contract runs until Dec. 31. 

Hallmark Sponsors NBCs 
New Color Tv Drama Series 

HALLMARK CARDS will sponsor the new 
NBC-TV 90 minute, monthly dramatic series, 
planned for next season in color, Sylvester L. 
Weaver Jr., president of NBC, announced last 
week. 

Mr. Weaver said Maurice Evans will star in 
two of the productions planned and will assem- 
ble stage and screen personalities for the others. 

Mr. Evans had appeared three times during 
the past two seasons on Hallmark productions 
of Shakespearean plays. The new series will 
include Shakespearean plays and also original 
works written for it. 

After Peter Pan's success, the network ad- 
vertised that Mr. Evans would produce a series 
of 90-minute dramatic programs called Sunday 
Matinee. The series will start Oct. 23 with 
originations from NBC's color studios in Brook- 
lyn and Color City at Burbank, Calif., NBC-TV 
said. 

Hallmark Cards, through Foote, Cone & 
Belding, will replace its current drama series 
on NBC-TV (Hallmark Hall of Fame, Sundays, 
5-5:30 p.m. EST) with the new drama show, 
which will be seen Sundays, 4-5:30 p.m. EST. 

Chevrolet, O'Cedar Splurge 
In Daytime Radio on ABC 

DAYTIME sales at ABC Radio perked up last 
week when the network announced that the 
Chevrolet Div. of General Motors Corp., 
Detroit, and O'Cedar Corp., Chicago, had 
arranged for special campaigns this month. 

The sponsorship by Chevrolet of the Monday, 
Wednesday and Friday 9:45-10 a.m. EST seg- 
ments of Breakfast Club (Mon.-Fri., 9-10 a.m. 
EST), starting April 18, was described as the 
first move by a major automotive manufacturer 
into daytime radio. Campbell-Ewald Co., De- 
troit, is the agency for Chevrolet. 

O'Cedar's contract, placed through Turner 
Adv., Chicago, covers sponsorship of 50 day- 
time news and feature programs, concentrated 
in a 10-day period, starting this Saturday. The 
purchase is for the full network of 350 stations. 

Campbell to Buy Swanson 

PLANS to purchase C. A. Swanson & Sons, 
Omaha, frozen food company, were announced 
last week by Campbell Soup Co., Camden, 
N. J. Terms of an agreement which are now 
being worked out call for Campbell to acquire 
all of Swanson's outstanding stock in exchange 



COLORCAST I NO 

Advance Schedule 
Of Network Color Shows 

CBS-TV 

April 14 (8:30-9:30 p.m.): Shower of 
Stars, "Ethel Merman's Show- 
stoppers," Chrysler Corp. 
through McCann-Erickson. 

April 17 (11-11:15 p.m.) : Sunday News 
Special, Norwich Pharmacal 
Co. through Benton & Bowles. 

May 4 (10-11 p.m.): Best of Broadway, 
"Broadway," Westinghouse elec- 
tric Co. through McCann- 
Erickson. 

May 12 (8:30-9:30 p.m.): Shower of 
Stars, "High Pitch," Chrysler 
Corp. through McCann-Erick- 



NBC-TV 

April 15 (11 a.m.-12 noon): Home, in- 
sert on fashion, participating. 

April 24 (7:30-9 p.m.): Max Liebman 
Presents, Hazel Bishop Inc. 
through Raymond Spector Co., 
and Sunbeam Corp. through 
Perrin-Paus Co. 

May 2 (8-9:30 p.m.): Producer's Show- 
case, Ford Motor Co. through 
Kenyon & Eckhardt, RCA 
through Kenyon & Eckhardt, 
Al Paul Lefton and Gray Adv. 
Agency. 

May 7 (9-10:30 p.m.): Max Liebman 
Presents, Oldsmobile Div., Gen- 
eral Motors through D. P. 
Brother & Co. 

[Note: This schedule will be corrected to 
press time of each issue of B*T.] 



for Campbell stock. Campbell, which has nine 
plants in the U. S. and Canada, will also acquire 
the ten plants where Swanson products are 
made. 

Campbell, until its recent entrance into the 
frozen-food field, was principally a canned-food 
manufacturer. 

Campbell, a regional and national advertiser, 
is sponsor of Dear Phoebe on NBC-TV and 
Lassie on CBS-TV. 

Marcus Explains Doeskin's 
Reliance on Network Radio 

DURING an NBC closed-circuit broadcast last 
week to affiliated stations, Ray Marcus, mer- 
chandising manager of Doeskin Products Inc., 
advised network radio to look ahead to the 
beginning of "great new days." The broadcast 
was aired in connection with the start of Doe- 
skin's sponsorship of Dr. Norman Vincent Peale 
Monday through Friday on NBC Radio, 10:05- 
10:15 a.m. EST. 

Doeskin recently switched from daytime tele- 
vision to daytime radio and has increased its 
1955 advertising expenditures by more than 
$100,000 over 1954. Mr. Marcus explained 
that "we are back in radio because we believe 
in it. We believe radio sells merchandise despite 
television and what others may think. And we 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 35 



ADVERTISERS & AGENCIES 



believe the way to reach women in the daytime 
is through radio." 

Network personnel were urged by Mr. Mar- 
cus to "act and think" as they did before tele- 
vision. Host of the closed-circuit broadcast 
was Sylvester L. Weaver Jr., president of NBC. 
Other participants were: Jules Singer, vice presi- 
dent of Grey Adv., and Dr. Peale, pastor of 
Marble Collegiate Church, New York. 

General Foods Elects 
Hampton Exec. Vice Pres. 

GEORGE HAMPTON was elected executive 
vice president of General Foods Corp., White 
Plains, N. Y., at a meeting of the board of 
directors last week. The directors also named 
the following new vice presidents: 

Robert H. Bennett, general manager of the 
Associated Products Division; Herbert M. 
Cleaves, general manager of the General Foods 
Sales Division; Edwin W. Ebel, marketing di- 
rector; F. J. Otterbein, general manager of the 
Birds Eye Division; Wesby R. Parker, general 
manager of the Post Cereals Division, and Roy 
H. Walters, director of research and develop- 
ment. 

Mr. Hampton has been operating vice presi- 
dent of General Foods since 1951 and a direc- 
tor of the corporation since last year. He 
joined the company in 1925 and held various 
industrial relations and managerial positions 
in various divisions before becoming general 
manager of the Franklin Baker Division in 
1946. 

Mr. Hampton and the other new vice presi- 
dents make their headquarters in White Plains, 
except Mr. Parker, who is located in Battle 
Creek, Mich. 

Jane Wyman Sought 
For P & G Tv Series 

NEGOTIATIONS are underway between Proc- 
ter & Gamble Co. and its agency, Comp- 
ton Adv., New York, and Jane Wyman, Acad- 
emy Award winning motion picture star, for a 
tv series to be presented in the fall. The new 
filmed dramatic show, which will mark Miss 
Wyman's debut in a regular tv series, will suc- 
ceed the present Fireside Theatre sponsored by 
P&G for Ivory Soap and Crisco on NBC-TV, 
Tuesdays, 9-9:30 p.m. The new program, which 
will star and be produced by Miss Wyman, is 
expected to be a new and different version of 
Fireside Theatre. Change is part of NBC-TV's 
move to strengthen its Tuesday night lineup. 

Gerber Airs Polio Report 
On ABC Network Tomorrow 

GERBER Baby Food Fund, Fremont, Mich., 
will present a special documentary broadcast, 
"Report on Salk Vaccine," giving latest devel- 
opments in the fight to conquer infantile pa- 
ralysis, over ABC Radio tomorrow (Tuesday), 
2-2:30 p.m. EST. In sponsoring this special 
public interest broadcast, the fund will omit 
the commercial portions of the program, con- 
fining itself only to the opening and closing 
sponsorship identifications required by FCC. 
DArcy Adv. is the agency. 

For the broadcast, ABC Radio will tape 
record the entire three-hour news conference 
on the Salk vaccine to be held tomorrow morn- 
ing, starting at 10 a.m., at the U. of Michigan, 
Ann Arbor. Dr. Thomas F. Francis, head of 
the task force of scientists which has been 
evaluating the vaccine, will report the finding 
of the group. 



LATEST RATINGS 



N 


IELSEN 






Top 10 Television Programs 






(Two Weeks Ending March 12) 






Number of Tv Homes Reached 








Homes 


Rank 


Program 


(000) 


1. 


Peter Pan (NBC) 


20,405 


2. 


1 Love Lucy (P & G) (CBS) 


17,892 


3. 


Jackie Gleason Show (CBS) 


1 6,986 


4. 


Toast of the Town (CBS) 


16,130 


5. 


Disneyland (ABC) 


15,772 


6. 


Dragnet (NBC) 


14,658 


7. 


You Bet Your Life (NBC) 


14,468 


8. 


Jack Benny Show (CBS) 


14,399 


9. 


Bob Hope Show (NBC) 


14,398 


10. 


Buick-Berle Show (NBC) 


13,892 


Percent of Tv Homes Reached Program Station 


Basis 






Homes 


Rank 


Program 


% 


1. 


Peter Pan (NBC) 


66.1 


2. 


1 Love Lucy (P & G) (CBS) 


57.4 


3. 


Jackie Gleason Show (CBS) 


54.9 


4. 


Toast of the Town (CBS) 


51.7 


5. 


Disneyland (ABC) 


50.6 


6. 


Dragnet (NBC) 


46.4 


7. 


Jack Benny Show (CBS) 


46.3 


8. 


Bob Hope Show (NBC) 


46.0 


9. 


You Bet Your Life (NBC) 


45.8 


10. 


Stage Show (CBS) 


45.0 




Copyright 1955 by A. C. Nielsen Co. 





Douglass, Inge Elected 
Vice Presidents at Bates 

JAMES C. DOUGLASS, director of radio and 
television department of Ted Bates & Co., 
New York, and Benson Inge, director of public 
relations for the agency, have been elected 
vice presidents. 

Mr. Douglass joined Ted Bates in 1953 in 
the newly-created post of director of radio and 




MR. DOUGLASS 



MR. INGE 



television after service as vice president in 
charge of radio and television for Erwin-Wasey 
& Co. Prior to that he was director of radio 
and tv activities for Colgate-Palmolive Co. 

Mr. Inge, vice president-director of public re- 
lations, has been with the agency since 1941. 
Before that he was with Benton & Bowles and 
worked as a newspaperman on several New 
York newspapers. 

Food Freezer Plan Firm 
Indicted for Grand Larceny 

GRAND JURY indictments of grand larceny 
were handed up in Queens County (New York) 
last week against a food freezer club and five 
of its officers and salesmen, who were accused 
of selling $235 freezers for about $700 with 
the aid of television and radio advertising and 
telephone solicitation. 

The indicted firm was the United Food Club 
of America, with offices in Brooklyn and 
Newark. Officers of the company indicted were 
Samuel Cohen, secretary-treasurer, and Sol 
Rosen, sales manager. 

Assistant District Attorney Frank J. Mc- 



Glynn voiced the belief that this was the first 
indictment in Queens growing out of television 
advertising. He said other food plans are being 
investigated, but declined to estimate the total 
amounts of alleged "gouging" involved. 

Mr. McGlynn said customers were offered 
$100 to $125 worth of "free food" with each 
freezer and were promised they would save 
30% on their monthly food bills. He claimed 
that United Food Club of America had no 
control over the price or quality of the food, 
which was supplied by an independent com- 
pany, and added that in one case, a woman 
told him the gift food had a retail value of $62. 

Creamer, Kudner Copywriter, 
Dies at 41 in N. Y. Hospital 

JOSEPH CREAMER, 41, copywriter for the 
Kudner Agency, New York, and for many 
years promotion and research director of Mu- 
tual's WOR New York, died last Monday in 
Medical Arts Hospi- 
tal in New York af- 
ter a brief illness. 
Funeral mass was 
said at St. Ignatius 
Loyola Church in 
New York last 
Wednesday. 

Mr. Creamer was 
with WOR and, after 
its formation, WOR- 
TV, from 1936 to 
1952, serving most 
of that time as di- 
rector of promotion 
and research. After 
leaving the WOR stations he served as an ad- 
vertising consultant to B*T and other industry 
clients in 1953-54 prior to joining Kudner on 
Oct. 1, 1954. 

A native New Yorker, he attended Harvard 
and Columbia U., was a special student at the 
Grand Central School of Art and the Art Stu- 
dent League, and was graduated in advertising 
from a correspondence school. He served with 
BBDO from 1930 to 1933, then joined the 
staff of the New York Sun, from which he 
moved to the Frank A. Munsey Co., magazine 
publishers, as publicity and promotion manager. 

He was with McCall Corp. as editorial and 
circulation promotion and publicity director 
from 1935 until he moved to WOR in 1936. 

Mr. Creamer won the Harvard U. Annual 
Advertising Award in 1938 for excellence in 
copy, in 1940 for excellence in creative typog- 
raphy and design, and in 1941 for creative 
excellence. 

Survivors include his wife, Ruth. 




Laundry Foundation Begins 
$250,000 Tv Campaign 

THE PROFESSIONAL Laundry Foundation, 
Newark, N. J., consisting of 350 professional 
power laundries in Connecticut, New York, 
New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Delaware, has 
announced the appointment of Feigenbaum & 
Wermen Adv. Agency, Philadelphia, to handle 
a quarter-million dollar television advertising 
program. 

The campaign, tentatively scheduled to start 
May 15, will promote the services of the pro- 
fessional laundry and will include tv partici- 
pations in feature programs on New York and 
Pennsylvania tv stations. The advertising will 
be backed up by a merchandising plan available 
to all participating laundries and by an extensive 
publicity and promotion campaign. 



Page 36 



April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



WHO IS IOWA'S 

FAVORITE RADIO STATION 

for DAYTIME LISTENING! 



WHO 












59.2% 



WMT f 29.4% 

■■MMBBMiawMMWMMMMII 1 1 IMP IIIIHMIIII ■■ ■! IIIIW IW': 





X he chart is lifted intact from Dr. Forest L. Whan's 
1954 Iowa Radio-Television Audience Survey — the seventeenth 
annual edition of the Survey which has become recognized 
everywhere as the No. 1 authority on the broadcast 
audience in Iowa. 

Iowa radio listeners' continuing, overwhelming preference 
for WHO is far from a lucky accident. It's the result 
of unprecedented investments in broadcast facilities — in 
programs and programming — in Public Service and 
in audience promotion. 

Whether or not your advertising needs suggest your use 
of WHO (or WHO-TV), if you're advertising in Iowa, you 
should by all means study the 1954 I.R.T.A. Survey. 
Write direct for a copy, or ask Free & Peters. 




FREE & PETERS, INC., National Representatives 



BUY ALL of IOWA- 
Plus "Iowa Plus"-with 

WHO 

Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 
P. A. Loyet, Resident Manager 



Here is a conclusive combination of two significant things : (1) a map showing 
our important and prosperous Industrial Heart of America — five states with 
a built-in buying power that totals close to four billion dollars — and 
(2) the mastheads of over 30 daily newspapers which always carry WSAZ-TV's 
program logs. They do this because their readers want to know what WSAZ-TV 
is bringing them every day throughout this whole 125-mile sweep. You can't 

beat the barometer of public demand ! 

Nor can you beat the selling influence of WSAZ-TV in about half a million 
TV homes. Words are fine — but solid proof is better. The nearest 

Katz office has lots of the latter. 



Huntington- 
Charleston, 
West Virginia 

CHANNEL 3 
Maximum Power 
NBC BASIC NETWORK 

affiliated 
ABC & Du Mom 




also affiliated 
with Radio 
Stations WSAZ. 
Huntington «fc 
WGKV, Charleston 
Lawrence H. Rogers, 
Vice President and 
General Manager. 
WSAZ, Inc. 
represented 
nationally 
bv The Katz 
Agency 



ADVERTISERS & AGENCIES 



NEW BUSINESS 

General Baking, N. Y. (Bond bread), planning 
radio spot announcement campaign in New Eng- 
land and upper New York, starting April 18 for 
13 weeks, in about 15 markets. BBDO, N. Y., 
is agency. 

Helene Curtis Industries Inc., Chicago (Suave, 
shampoo, beauty divs., through Gordon Best 
Co., Chicago, and Spray Net and Lanolin Dis- 
covery, through Earle Ludgin & Co., Chicago), 
reportedly dropping Professional Father on 
CBS-TV (Sat., 10-10:30 p.m. EST) within next 
few weeks. 

AGENCY SHORTS 

Tracy-Locke Co., Dallas, appoints, as research 
consultants, Dr. Ernest Dichter and Institute 
for Research in Mass Motivation. 

E. Taylor Wertheim Adv. moves to 347 Madi- 
son Avenue, New York 17. Telephone number 
is Murray Hill 4-7545. 

Charles Bowes Advertising, L. A., elected to 
Southern California Adv. Agency Assn. 

Mumm. Mullay & Nichols, Cleveland, has 
opened New York office. 

AGENCY APPOINTMENTS 

American Chicle Co. (Clorets mints, gum), 
N. Y., names Ted Bates & Co., N. Y., to handle 
those products effective April 1, in addition to 
Beeman's Pepsin & Adams Chiclets which 
agency has been handling. 

Concord Oil Corp., N. Y., names Wexton Co., 
N. Y., with Allen A. Brinker as account exec- 
utive. 

Lucky Tiger Mfg. Co. (Lucky Tiger 3 -Purpose 
Hair Tonic, Lucky Tiger Magic shampoo), Kan- 
sas City, Mo., names Erwin, Wasey & Co., 
N. Y., effective May 1. 

Simoniz Co. (Ivalon sponge), Chicago, ap- 
points Tatham-Laird Inc., same city. 

Crosley-Bendix Divs., Avco Mfg. Corp., Cin- 
cinnati, appoints Earle Ludgin & Co., Chicago, 
to handle all "white" appliances (ranges, refrig- 
erators, etc.) effective July 1. Ludgin already 
handles home laundry line. 

Quaker Mfg. Co. (gas and oil space heaters), 
Chicago, appoints Schwimmer & Scott, same 
city, with Robert Larson as account executive. 
Radio-tv will be used. 

United Grocers Ltd., S. F., appoints Honig- 
Cooper Co., same city, effective May 1. 

Service Publishing Co. (Social Security plan- 
ning guides), Pittsburgh, appoints Sykes Adv. 
Inc., same city. 



Easter Praise 

NOD of approval on the handling of last 
year's Easter Parade on New York's Fifth 
Ave. went to the radio, television and 
newsreel industries last week from F. W. 
H. Adams, New York police commis- 
sioner. Mr. Adams' letter to assignment 
editors complemented "the absence of 
masquerading and commercialism," and 
said he felt the "reporting was, in all 
respects, in keeping with the spirit of 
Easter." In the 1955 Easter coverage, 
Mr. Adams expressed confidence that 
"voluntary self-discipline" would again 
be exercised. 



A&A PEOPLE 

Kenneth F. Browning, formerly account execu- 
tive, Grant Adv., Chicago, appointed vice presi- 
dent and general manager, Tracy-Locke Co., 
New Orleans. 

Myles E. Baker, manager, service dept., Lennen 
& Newell, N. Y., appointed vice president in 
charge of service. 

Walter G. Smith, vice president and director of 
media planning, Biow-Beirn-Toigo, N. Y., to 
William Esty Co., same city, as vice president. 

Emile Frisard, copywriter, Biow-Beirn-Toigo, 
N. Y., promoted to copy group head. 

James C. Zeder Jr., formerly with McCann- 
Erickson, N. Y., to Plymouth Div., Chrysler 
Corp., Detroit, as radio-tv advertising manager. 

David Palmer, Morse International, N. Y., to 
Erwin, Wasey & Co., N. Y., as merchandising 
director. 

Frank McCulIough, formerly with Young & 
Rubicam, N. Y., appointed marketing director, 
Morey, Humm & Johnstone Inc., same city. 

James J. Cullen, former agency owner, to Mc- 
Hugh-Cather Adv. Agency Inc., Beverly Hills, 
Calif., as account executive. 

Frank J. Sharrer, merchandising and copy staff, 
Young & Rubicam, N. Y., to Beaumont & Hoh- 
man Inc., L. A., as account executive. 

Robert E. Walsh Jr. to account executive staff, 
Paris & Peart, N. Y.; Jane O'Keefe to agency as 
test kitchen supervisor. 

Donald C. Arries, formerly with Leo Burnett 
Co., Chicago, to N. W. Ayer & Son, Chicago, 
in radio-tv department as director and produc- 
tion supervisor. 

Eugene B. Shields appointed cooperative adver- 
tising manager, Norge Div., Borg-Warner Corp., 
Chicago. 

Justin M. Schuchat, copy supervisor, St. Louis 
Post-Dispatch, to Warner & Todd Inc., St. Louis, 
in creative capacity and on planboard and cam- 
paign advisory committee. 

Robert E. Ruther, formerly art director, Royer 
& Rogers Inc., St. Louis, to Krupnick & Assoc., 
same city, in same capacity. 

Larry Gray, formerly art director, Lang, Fisher 
& Stashower, Cleveland, and Dan Gallagher, 
freelancer, to McCann-Erickson, Cleveland, as 
art directors; Stanley Rogers, BBDO, Cleveland, 
to McCann-Erickson copy staff. 

Jerry Keefe, formerly manager, WFIL (FM) 
Chicago, appointed sales promotion director, 
Autopoint Co. (pencils, office specialities), same 
city. 

Charles P. Flynn, independent Chicago radio-tv 
program producer, to advertising services dept., 
Chrysler Corp., Detroit, as tv services super- 
visor. 

Jack Sinnott, timebuyer, Benton & Bowles, 
N. Y, to Ted Bates & Co., N. Y., in similar 
capacity, succeeding Mike James, resigned to 
join Edward Petry & Co., N. Y, station 
representatives. 

Joe S. Watkins, formerly with Zimmer, Keller 
& Calvert, Detroit, to Bonsib Adv. Agency, Ft. 
Wayne, Ind., in creative and contact capacities. 

Roderick A. Mitchell, production supervisor, 
radio-tv dept., N. W. Ayer & Son, Chicago, to 
N. Y. office as representative on electric com- 
panies advertising program; Anne Robert trans- 
fers from radio-tv traffic dept. in N. Y. office to 
dept.'s film production staff. 



Radio's Story Goes Touring 

JOINT presentation on radio by ABC 
Radio, CBS Radio, MBS and NBC Ra- 
dio [B«T, Dec. 8, 1954] will go on tour 
this week after a well received New 
York "engagement." Representatives of 
the networks will travel to Chicago 
where they will tell nine agencies of the 
progress radio has made in the last few 
years. 

Agencies which will see the presenta- 
tion are: BBDO; Leo Burnett Co.; Foote, 
Cone & Belding; Earle Ludgin & Co.; 
McCann-Erickson; Needham, Louis & 
Brorby; Tatham - Laird; J. Walter 
Thompson Co., and Geoffrey Wade Adv. 

Network representatives and their re- 
spective affiliations are: Jack Curtis, 
ABC; Frank Nesbitt, CBS; Henry Pos- 
ter, MBS, and Howard Gardner, NBC. 
Radio Advertising Bureau, New York, 
handled arrangements for the Chicago 
meetings. 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



George Thomson, formerly with International 
Minerals and Chemical Corp., appointed assist- 
ant research manager at Waldie & Briggs Inc., 
Chicago advertising agency. 

Guy Cunningham, director of advertising and 
promotion of Motion Pictures for Television 
since 1953 and earlier with CBS for 11 years 
as director of promotion and sales manager of 
WEEI Boston and director of promotion for 
CBS Spot Sales, appointed sales promotion di- 
rector of Nation's Business magazine. 
Don Hillman, formerly of NBC and Biow- 
Beirn-Toigo Inc., N. Y., to Benton & Bowles, 
N. Y., in radio-tv copy department. 

George Kavner, public relations director, Na- 
tional Brewing Co., Baltimore, to Benton & 
Bowles, N. Y., as publicity-promotion repre- 
sentative. 

James G. Bennett, president and national sales 
manager of Commonwealth Home products, 
N. Y.; Benson Bieley, eastern regional sales 
manager, Lehn & Fink Products Corp., N. Y., 
and William G. Grunick, merchandising dept., 
Maxon agency, to market development dept., 
Compton Adv., N. Y. 

James P. MacPherson to Warwick & Legler, 
N. Y. 

Helen Ver Standig, vice president, M. Belmont 
Ver Standig Inc., 
Washington, elected 
to board of gover- 
nors of American 
Assn. of Adv. Agen- 
cies at meeting of 
Chesapeake chapter 
and is only fifth 
woman in 50-year 
history of 4As to 
hold such position. 

Arthur C. Nielsen, 

president, A. C. Niel- 
son Co. (market re- 
search), Chicago, on 
trip to Britain and Europe to visit firm's offices 
in preparation for inauguration of Nielsen Tele- 
vson Audience Measurement Service in Great 
Britain and establishment of marketing research 
services at later date in Switzerland and Eire. 
Richard M. Davis, manager of Milwaukee of- 
fice, Compton Adv., N. Y., appointed chairman, 
publicity committee, 1955 Milwaukee Commu- 
nity Chest Drive. 

April 11, 1955 • Page 39 




MRS. VER STANDIG 



Ray Jewell, Manager, California Prune Advisory Board 
Harold Brogger, Assistant Manager in charge of 
Advertising and Promotion, California Prune Advisory Board 
Mildred Wrenn, Media Manager 
Botsford, Constantine & Gardner, San Francisco 
Stanley G. Swanberg, Executive Vice Pres. and 
Account Representative, Botsford, Constantine & Gardner 
Martin Percival, San Francisco Division Sales Manager, 
Radio, NBC Spot Sales 

Candid Photo by Dennis Stock. Taken at California 
Packing Co. plant, San Rafael, California 



Decision -makers who market 



food products are 

Sold 




The California Prune Advisory 
Board and its agency, 
Botsford, Constantine & Gardner, 
are Sold on Spot as a 
basic advertising medium! 



To move an unusually large output of smaller prunes, the 
California Prune Advisory Board is using Spot Radio exclu- 
sively ... a saturation advertising schedule in the nation's key 
markets. This successful Spot Radio campaign : 

• delivers effective selling coverage at low cost 

• increases consumer demand for prunes 

• earns big-league merchandising co-operation 
by the stations represented by NBC Spot Sales 

• wins the acceptance of retail food stores 
who stock more prunes than ever before 

You, too, can profit from these advantages. Whether your sales 
problem is strong seasonal push or big-volume selling the year 



Stations Represented by NBC Spot Sales: 



around, Spot Radio and Spot Television should be a basic part 
of your overall plan. 

Ask your agency or an NBC Spot Sales representative to 
show you how Spot can fit effectively into your campaign... 
and how the stations represented by NBC Spot Sales can sell 
for you in eleven major markets, accounting for 45% of the 
nation's food sales. 

More and more advertisers are Sold on Spot, because more 
customers are Sold on Spot . . . 

and some spots are better than others! llVBCl SPOT SALES 

30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 
Chicago Detroit Cleveland Washington San Francisco Los Angeles 
Charlotte* Atlanta* Dallas* *Bomar Lowrance Associates 




RADIO 

WRC Washington, D. C. 
WTAM Cleveland 
WAVE Louisville 
KGU Honolulu, Hawaii 
WRCA New York 
WMAQ Chicago 
KNBC San Francisco 
KSD St. Louis 
and the NBC Western 
Radio Network 



TELEVISION 

KPTV Portland, Ore. 
WAVE-TV Louisville 
WRGB Schenectady- 
Albany -Troy 
KONA-TV Honolulu. Hawaii 
WRCA-TV New York 
WNBQ Chicago 
KRCA / ,os Angeles 
KSD-TV St. Louis 
WRC -TV Washington, D. C. 
WNBK Cleveland 



FILM 



REPUBLIC DEBATES GOING TV-ONLY 



Board of directors' decision ex- 
pected on whether regular mo- 
tion picture production should 
be terminated. 

REPUBLIC Pictures Corp. may discontinue 
production of motion pictures for theatres on 
a regular basis and concentrate on the produc- 
tion of film programs for television, Herbert 
J. Yates, president, told stockholders at the 
company's annual meeting in New York last 
week. A decision, he said, is expected to be 
made by the board of directors within 90 days. 

A spokesman for the company later told 
B*T that reports indicating that Republic would 
not produce theatrical motion pictures at all 
was inaccurate. He explained that Republic 
has been producing from 16 to 20 pictures a 
year on a regular schedule, and said the pro- 



PARAMOUNT, M-G-M 
EYEING TV FIELD 

PARAMOUNT PICTURES and M-G-M are 
the latest major motion picture studios re- 
portedly mulling an entry into tv, while Para- 
mount is understood to be conferring with 
Colgate-Palmolive over the present NBC-TV 
Colgate Comedy Hour. A studio spokesman told 
B»T that "Paramount won't do anything in 
tv that doesn't provide a healthy plug for its 
theatrical feature releases." The assumption 
is that Paramount might build a tv program 
around contract stars and film clips. 

M-G-M has reached the survey stage with Les 
Peterson, executive in charge of the studio's 
radio-tv department contacting west coast tv 
film producers and network officials. Report of 
survey results will determine whether M-G-M 
will form a tv film production unit, cooperate 
with tv in some other fashion or bypass the 
medium altogether. 

Meanwhile reports persist that Warner Bros, 
is reaching an agreement with ABC-TV for a 
weekly hour-long program to be sponsored by 
General Electric and Liggett & Myers. Twen- 
tieth Century-Fox supposedly has a weekly 
hour-long program deal sewed up with CBS-TV 
for GE. Additionally it has appointed General 
Artists Corp. its sales representative for its 
studio series features, which are now potential 
video film packages. 

NBC Film Div. Holds 
National Sales Meet 

NBC FILM Div. will hold a national sales 
meeting April 13-15 at the Hotel Warwick, 
New York, Jake Keever, national sales man- 
ager, announced last week. Expected to attend, 
in addition to the entire sales force, are: Syl- 
vester L. Weaver Jr., NBC president; Robert 
W. Sarnoff, NBC executive vice president; Carl 
M. Stanton, network's vice president in charge 
of the film division, and Ted Sisson, director 
of NBC Film Div. 

The three-day session will include panel and 
sales discussions. The program covers advertis- 
ing and promotion, publicity and exploitation, 
research and other departmental activities di- 
rectly related to sales. 

The meeting also will be concerned with 
Steve Donovan, Western Marshall, the divi- 
sion's newest series now in production in Holly- 
wood, as well as with several other new proper- 
ties. 

Page 42 • April 11, 1955 



posal under consideration would mean that in 
a given year, the company might produce two 
or three motion pictures or none at all. 

Mr. Yates told stockholders he had notified 
major theatre chains of the impending move. 
He said the only way they could prevent it 
"would be higher rentals and longer play pe- 
riods for the company's films." He stressed 
that no final decision has been made. 

Bernard Smith, a director of the company, 
did not favor the "retreat" from making films 
for theatres. He said that he was not certain 
whether he was satisfied with Mr. Yates as 
president, claiming that information given to 
directors has been meager and that it has been 
difficult to give an "informed judgment" on 
the state of company finances. 

Republic Pictures already has made avail- 
able to television 435 feature films, serials and 
short subjects, a spokesman said. 




AFTER signing an exclusive New York con- 
tract for Encyclopaedia Britannica's Film 
Library subjects, to be shown over WRCA- 
TV there, Hamilton Shea (seated), NBC 
vice president in charge of WRCA-AM- 
TV, looks over footage of one of the films 
with Steven Krantz (I), WRCA-TV pro- 
gram manager, and Ed Hochhauser, vice 
president-general manager, Associated 
Program Service of the Muzak Corp. 



78 'Foreign Intrigue' Shows 
Acquired by Official Films 

ACQUISITION by Official Films of the distri- 
bution rights to 78 films of the Sheldon Reyn- 
olds Foreign Intrigue series was announced last 
week by Harold Hackett, president of Official. 

Under an agreement made with William 
Morris Agency, acting for Mr. Reynolds, Offi- 
cial will syndicate the 39 original films starring 
Jerome Thor and 39 programs starring James 
Daly. 

Additionally, Official is negotiating for an 
additional 39 shows of the Foreign Intrigue 
series starring Gerald Mohr, which currently 
is being carried in some markets by Ballantine. 

A company spokesman voiced the view that 
Official "probably" will complete this trans- 
action by July. Above and beyond this, he 



said, it is "highly likely" that Official will ob- 
tain rights to an additional 39 films of the first j 
series starring Jerome Thor, which would give 
Official 156 programs in all. 

"We sincerely feel," Mr. Hackett stated, "this 
is a 'pre-sold' commodity, not merely in the 
more than 100 markets where the series will 
be first-run, but to the great mass of television 
advertisers as well . . . that a conservative esti- I 
mate will see sales figures during the next two 
years of from $2.5-$3 million for the series." r 

Herb Jaffe, vice president in charge of sales 
for Official, reported that "within a few days" 
after the company had obtained syndication 
rights to the series, it had completed sales of 
about $200,000. 

Guild Films Sales Activity 
Put Into Single Operation 

GUILD FILMS Co., New York, has combined 
all of its sales activities into a single, integrated 
operation, it was announced last week by Reub 
Kaufman, president. The move was an out- 
growth of the acquisition by Guild Films of 
the distribution rights to the feature film prop- 
erties of Motion Pictures for Television. 

The feature films previously had been han- 
dled by a special unit, but under the new opera- 
tion, all salesmen will handle all properties, 
including syndicated series, feature films, car- 
toons and film libraries. The sales staff will 
be under the supervision of Manny Reiner, vice 
president in charge of sales. 

Mr. Kaufman noted that although salesmen 
will sell all properties, Joseph P. Smith has been 
assigned responsibility for syndicated films and 
Erin Ezzes for feature film sales activities. 
Karl Gericke has been named sales coordinator, 
and Margery Kerr continues as New York ac- 
count executive. 

Guild Credits 'Looney Tunes' 
For Monthly Sales Record 

SALES by Guild Films in March totaling more 
than $1 million set a new monthly record for 
the company, Manny Reiner, vice president in 
charge of sales, said last week. Mr. Reiner 
credited a popular demand for the "Looney- 
Tunes" acquired by Guild in February, for help- 
ing push the figure to its record high. 

The "Looney-Tunes" are marketed as a 
cartoon library for unlimited use for a two- 
year period. Guild Films noted that some 
stations are selling them as strip program se- 
ries, others are building across the board shows 
for national spot advertisers. 

Sunset Productions Formed 
As Warner Tv Subsidiary 

LAUNCHING of Sunset Productions as the 
tv film subsidiary of Warner Bros, with Jack 
Warner Jr. as production head was announced 
Friday by Jack L. Warner. Sunset's first project, 
now in preparation, is Men of the Sky, half-hour 
film series in color covering aviation's role in 
war and peace. 

Deal was closed with Vincent B. Evans, 
screenwriter, to produce the series under the 
supervision of Mr. Warner Jr. 

Bivas to Tv Commercial Firm 

FRANK T. BIVAS, formerly director of the 
motion picture division, McCann-Erickson, New 
York, to California Studios, Hollywood, to head 
up Roland Reed-Gross, Krasne Tv Commer- 
cials. Organization, recently formed by Roland 
Reed Productions and Gross-Krasne Inc. [B«T, 
March 28], already has contracted for $250,000 
in new commercial film business, according to 
Guy V. Thayer; Reed executive vice president. 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 




"this 



beginner ! 




e been a 



"I mean it," says John, well-known mixer at that 
favored haunt of Boston agency folk, the Statler lounge 
bar. "There he was, sitting behind his Wurzburger, 
crowing about the spot schedule he'd just made up 

for Mother Dumple's All-American Piccalilli. And 

you know what? This character completely overlooks 
two of the best spot buys in New England ! 

"Sure — you know and / know! WABI for radio and 
WABI-TV for television. Real super-stuff in Maine's 
seven most terrific counties with almost half-a-billion 
retail sales! Everybody knows they're a 'must'. But 
not junior-boy ! Cripes, he must\e been a beginner 
or something . . ." 

John, of course, might be drawing unfair conclusions. 
Could be that Mother Dumple's has no distribution 
in our big Bangor-centered market of 350,000 
customers. But, brother, there's no slicker way to 
get it (and gild up a piccalilli sales chart in the 
bargain) than by putting these double-barrelled Down 
Easters to work for you! 




"l^ /T" Represented by: 

B A N G ( 



George P. Hollingbery — Nationally 
Kettell-Carter — New England 




MAINE 



General manager: Leon P. Gorman, Jr. 



FILM 



TPA Elects Eells 
Western Div. V.P. 

ELECTION of Bruce Eells as vice president 
in charge of the Western Div. of Television 
Programs of America is being announced to- 
day (Monday) by Michael M. Sillerman, TPA 




executive vice presi- 
dent. Mr. Eells, who 
has been with the 
company since 1953, 
was formerly man- 
ager of the division. 

Under Mr. Eells' 
direction, TPA plans 
"an extensive expan- 
sion in its coast sales 
and service depart- 
ments," Mr. Siller- 
man said. 

In 1947 Mr. Eells 



MR EELLS organized Bruce 

Eells & Assoc., con- 
cerned with developing a new cooperative pro- 
gram syndication plan among 400 U. S. and 
Canadian stations. 

Mr. Eells joined Ziv Television Programs 
Inc. in 1952 as New England representative, 
moving to TPA the following year. Before his 
own business venture Mr. Eells was with the 
Don Lee Network as an account executive and 
later became sales manager of KHJ Los An- 
geles. He also has served as business manager 
for Young & Rubicam on the West Coast. 

FILM SALES 

International News Service, N. Y., has sold 
INS-Telenews daily newsfilm service to WSFA- 
TV Montgomery, Ala., and WBRZ (TV) Baton 
Rouge, La. Firm also has sold This Week in 
Sports to: Bethlehem Steel for two additional 
markets, WOR-TV New York and WNAC-TV 
Boston; KFDA-TV Amarillo, Tex., under spon- 
sorship of Emmett Davis Buick Co.; Argentine 
Alpargata Co., Buenos Aires, through J. Wal- 
ter Thompson Co., N. Y., and to General Tire 
& Rubber Co. dealers, through D'Arcy Adv., St. 
Louis, for showing on KOTV (TV) Tulsa, 
KBES-TV Medford, Ore., KTNT (TV) Tacoma 
and WMBV (TV) Marinette, Wis., under title 
General Sports Time. INS also has sold Tele- 
news service to NWDR (Nordwestdeutscher 
Rundfunk) tv network in West Germany. 

Ziv Television Programs Inc., N. Y., has signed 
contract with Societe Suisse de Radiodiffusion 
for two Ziv film features in two languages. 
Shows are Favorite Story, with German sound- 
track, and Mr. District Attorney, with French 
soundtrack. Both series are scheduled to begin 
May 1 in Switzerland and will be telecast for 
minimum of 26 weeks over transmitters in 
Geneva and Zurich. 

FILM DISTRIBUTION 

Award Television Corp., N. Y., announces first 
13 episodes of The Jimmy Demaret Show cur- 
rently being launched on 39 tv stations in U. S. 
and Canada. Quarter-hour program will total 
39 films when completed and features Jimmy 
Demaret and guests from entertainment and 
sports fields. 

FILM PRODUCTION 

Amy Vanderbilt, etiquette authority, has com- 
pleted new tv film series, It's Good Taste, for 
sponsor, Grennan Cook Book Cakes, to follow 
earlier series this month on number of sta- 
tions. Agency: Young & Rubicam, Chicago. 

International Television Productions, Houston, 
Tex., will produce tv film series based on actual 



cases from files of Texas Rangers and is nego- 
tiating to start filming within 60 days in order 
to have property ready for September or Octo- 
ber debut. 

Ashley Steiner Agency, N. Y., announces that 

work on pilot film of How Now, Brown, new 
tv comedy series starring Keenan Wynn, started 
last week. Series is being written by Bill 
Manhoff. 

RANDOM SHOTS 

Howard Grafman, former NBC Radio director, 
announces formation of his own tv film distri- 
bution organization, Howard Grafman & 
Assoc. Company will be midwest representative 
for Governor Television Attractions, Major 
Television Productions, National Television 
Films, Atlantic Television Corp. and Harry S. 
Goodman Productions, plus New York Yankees 
Game of the Week. Included among his prop- 
erties as distributor will be Strange Adventure, 
series of 52 quarter-hour strips which originally 
appeared on Fireside Theatre, it was announced. 

GAC-TV, N. Y., subsidiary of General Artists 
Corp., has been appointed as sales agency for 
20th Century-Fox-Tv's first filmed series, My 
Friend Flicka, based on motion picture prop- 
erty. It will be half -hour, 39-episode series. 

FILM PEOPLE 

Phil Field promoted to vice president, MAC 
Studios, tv distribution subsidiary, McConkey 
Artists Corp., Hollywood. 

Sidney Barbet, appointed executive director, 
Buyer's Assoc. Inc., filmbuyer firm for WTVW 
(TV) Milwaukee. 

Mickey Dubin, MCA-TV, N. Y., to Chad Inc., 
Wilton, Conn., producer of tv and commercial 
films, as executive director of sales. 

Donald E. Tomkins, radio-tv director, Grant 
Adv., N. Y., to Owen Murphy Productions 
Inc., N. Y., as general sales manager. 

Charles Alsup, in charge of sales, western div., 
Advertisers' Television Program Service Inc., 
N. Y., appointed sales manager, syndication 
div.; Maurie H. Gresham, vice president and 
syndication div. general manager, will head 
newly-formed separate division, national and 
retail sales; Alex H. Horwitz and George Turner 
Jr. to ATPS as account executives in L. A. and 
N. Y., respectively. 

Melvin L. Hirsch to A. J. Armstrong Co. (com- 
mercial financing firm), N. Y., as managing 
executive in charge of motion picture and tv 
financing department. 

Jerry Franken, formerly sales director, Lester 
Lewis Assoc. (tv film), N. Y., to Television Pro- 
grams of America, same city, as publicity di- 
rector. 

Howard H. Henkin, formerly with Tele- 
PrompTer Corp., N. Y., appointed eastern sales 
manager, Walter Schwimmer Co. (formerly 
Walter Schwimmer Productions), Chicago. 

Irving Levine, formerly animator for Jam 
Handy (program producers), to Medical Film 
Guild Inc., N. Y., as head of art and film 
animation dept. 

Johnnie Malinowski, cameraman, Medical Film 
Guild, N. Y., promoted to photography director. 

Robert Sloane, 42, ABC-TV Treasury Men 
in Action writer-producer, Prockter Television 
Enterprises, N. Y., died April 2 of heart at- 
tack. 



— PROGRAM SERVICES 

Smith, Kline & French Signs 
First One-Year TNT Contract 

IN A MOVE said to mark the first long-term 
contract in closed-circuit television, Smith, Kline 
& French Labs has signed a one-year contract 
with Theatre Network Television Inc., calling 
for use of TNT's closed-circuit network facili- 
ties for all of the pharmaceutical company's 
programs. 

In announcing the contract last week, Fan- 
shawe Lindsley, TNT Tele-Sessions general 
manager, said the transaction is "a departure 
from the single telecast agreement heretofore 
customary in closed-circuit tv and introduces 
a new type of relationship between a closed- 
circuit company and its customer." 

The first program under the new contract 
will be telecast on May 9 to 36 cities in the 
recently-established TNT Tele-Sessions, 41-city 
closed-circuit network. This will mark the third 
time that Smith, Kline & French has used 
TNT's large-screen closed-circuit facilities. Plans 
call for additional telecasts during the remainder 
of this year. 

Bartholomew Takes Over 
Presidency of United Press 

FRANK H. BARTHOLOMEW officially be- 
came president and general manager of the 
United Press Wednesday succeeding Hugh Bail- 
lie, who has been 
advanced to chair- 
man of the board. 
Mr. Bartholomew, 
first vice president of 
UP since last Au- 
gust, moved to New 
York last week from 
San Francisco where 
he had been in 
charge of UP's Pa- 
cific area. 

The election of 
Mr. Bartholomew, 

announced last Dec. 
MR. BARTHOLOMEW 1Q> wag effective last 

Wednesday, the 20th anniversary of his prede- 
cessor, Mr. Baillie, in the presidency. Mr. Bar- 
tholomew in his new capacity is in charge of 
UP's world-wide service to newspapers, radio 
and tv stations. 

UP Refuses ACLU Request 
To Rehire Writer Polumbaum 

AMERICAN Civil Liberties Union last week 
urged the United Press to rehire television 
writer Theodore S. Polumbaum, who had been 
discharged for refusing to testify fully concern- 
ing alleged communist affiliations before the 
House Un-American Activities Committee in 
April 1953, but UP refused to consider ACLU's 
request. 

The positions of the ACLU and UP were 
made known in an exchange of letters between 
Patrick Murphy Malin, executive director of 
ACLU, and Earl J. Johnson, UP vice president. 
In enunciating the ACLU viewpoint, Mr. Malin 
said that "since there is no evidence Polum- 
baum ever distorted the news, the UP should 
have retained him in accord with fair play and 
constitutional guarantees of free speech." Mr. 
Johnson asserted that the dismissal was "just 
and proper because his [Polumbaum's] conduct 
before the Velde Committee in Washington 
ended his usefulness in the service and made 
him a serious liability." 

Mr. Polumbaum was discharged because of 
his refusal to answer House committee ques- 




Page 44 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



There's sl 




to tlie Scranton- 





Hazleton IVLarvket 




Look at your latest ARB ratings and you'll 
see a most amazing switch in the great 
Northeastern Pennsylvania area. You'll see 
how overwhelmingly the lead has shifted to 
WGBI-TV. 

WGBI-TV presents the highest rated show 
in the entire market. 

WGBI-TV is first in total quarter hours of 
viewing 9 A.M. to sign off. 

WGBI-TV is ahead of the second station 
during this same period by 43 
quarter hours (while on the air) 
and leads all of the remaining 
stations combined. 

WGBI-TV carries five out of the top 10 
shows and also has the highest 
rated local newscast and late 
film theatre. 

In any category WGBI-TV's leadership is 
impressive. 

If you want to sell in Northeastern Penn- 
sylvania, you had better be on 




Dominating the Scranton-Wilkes-Barre- 
Hazleton market. And soon to be the Highest 
Powered Station on the CBS Network with 1 
million watts. 





Represented exclusively by BLAIR TV 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 45 



PROGRAM SERVICES 




... you soy 
7 BOSTON and NEWARK 
are in WASHINGTON STATE? 



WELL, NOT EXACTLY . . . but suppose you 
take all the people of Boston and Newark 
and place them within a circle with a 45 mile 
radius. That circle is the size of the KTNT- 
TV "A"contour, and the combined popu- 
lations of Boston and Newark equal 
the number of people living within 
that contour. 




CANADA 



Of all TV stations 
in the fabulous 
Puget Sound area, 
only KTNT-TV 
covers all 5* cities 
in its "A" contour. 
*Seattle, Jacoma, 
Everett, Bremer- 
('on, Otympia 

Due to terrain, climate and geographic peculiarities, the 
population distribution of Washington State is very 
spotty. And the biggest "spot" . . . the greatest concen- 
tration of population ... is located in the Puget Sound 
Area. The transmitting tower of KTNT-TV is right in 
the center of this population concentration. Within the 
boundaries of KTNT-TV's "A" contour are over 1,200,000 
progressive people . . . having average incomes above the 
national average. And that's not all. Another 800,000 
people, just as prosperous, live within good-signal dis- 
tance outside the "A" contour. 

Buy television where the people are . 



CHANNEL ELEVEN 




. Buy KTNT-TV. 

316,000 WATTS 



Antenna Height 
1000 FT. ABOVE SEA LEVEL 

CBS Television for Puget Sound 



Represented Nationally by Weed Television 

KTNT-TV, TACOMA 5, WASHINGTON 



Tfie Word Gefs Around. ..Buy Buget Sound! 



tions concerning alleged communist affiliations 
while a student at Yale U. In his application 
form filed with UP, Mr. Johnson said, Mr. 
Polumbaum had denied membership in the 
Communist Party. ACLU said he told the com- 
mittee that he would be willing to tell his em- 
ployer about his personal political activities. 

Mr. Johnson said he personally directed the 
firing of Mr. Polumbaum because the writer 
"did what no United Press employe should 
have done: he cast himself in the role of a 
conspicuous figure in a public controversy." 
He said Mr. Polumbaum's refusal to answer 
questions "endangered UP's goodwill among 
its newspaper and broadcasting subscribers who 
depend on the UP's impartiality and reliability 
as a news-gathering organization." 

International News Service 
Promotes Reed, Allerup 

TWO PROMOTIONS at International News 
Service, New York, were announced last week 
by Seymour Berkson, general manager. 

Philip G. Reed, managing editor, was ap- 
pointed assistant general manager, a newly-cre- 
ated position. Mr. Reed has been with the 
organization since 1935 when he joined INS 
as a member of the Chicago staff. He later 
was moved to Washington, where he served 




MR. REED 



MR. ALLERUP 



as assistant to the day editor and later night 
editor. After covering World War II as a war 
correspondent in the Pacific, he returned to 
INS as night editor in New York and in 1947 
was named managing editor. 

He will be replaced by Paul R. Allerup, who 
has been associate managing editor. Mr. Aller- 
up joined INS in 1934 and since then has served 
in bureaus in Cincinnati, Columbus, Pittsburgh 
and Chicago. During World War II, he was 
with the U. S. Army in Europe. Mr. Allerup 
was named night editor in New York in 1947, 
day editor in 1948, general news editor in 1949 
and has been associate managing editor since 
1952. 

Brown Theatrical Agency 
Appoints Elkins, Others 

HILLARD ELKINS, formerly head of the 
dramatic tv department of William Morris 
Agency, New York, has joined Henry C. Brown 
Inc., New York, theatrical agency, as vice presi- 
dent in charge of the newly-formed dramatic 
department. In his new affiliation, Mr. Elkins 
will supervise activities on both talent and pro- 
duction levels. 

In addition to Mr. Elkins appointment, Alixe 
Gordin, who was previously in charge of casting 
for Studio One and other CBS-TV productions, 
has joined the Brown firm as casting director 
for legitimate and dramatic talent. Mr. Elkins 
will be assisted by George Piatt, formerly as- 
sistant to the head of tv films and properties 
department at William Morris. 

Arthur Black, advertising manager of Fed- 



Page 46 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



WHY? 



KCMCTV 

COVE RS 



The Only Maximum Power 
Between Memphis & Dallas 



WITH WHAT? 

200 Monthly Hours of 
Network Commercial Programs 



TO WHOM? 

* 112,440 TV Homes in 31 
Counties of 4 States 



COMPLETE COVERAGE 
FROM THE HUB 

OF A BILLION-DOLLAR 
AREA MARKET 

•TELEVISION MAGAZINE — MARCH I, 1955 



MAXIMUM POWER 

100 # 000 WATTS— CHANNEL 6 
CBS— ABC— DuMONT 




Broadcasting • Telecasting 



KCMC-TV 

TEXARKANA, TEXAS-ARKANSAS 

Represented by 

VENARD, RINTOUL & McCONNELL, Inc. 
WALTER M. WINDSOR, GENERAL MANAGER 




198,061 love letters 

from the land where TV means' 

"Taint Visible"' 




BIG AGGIE LAND 



I Well, not exactly 
love letters, but the 
next best thing. 
You see, during 
1954 WNAX-570 
received a whop- 
ping total of 198,- 
061 pieces of mail — 141,870 of 
which were specifically addressed 
to local commercial programs. That 
is positive proof of active listener 
response! 

This mail came from all over 
Big Aggie Land, and beyond. A 
total of 439 counties in 8 states 
responded including^ the Big Aggie 
States of Iowa, Nebraska, the Da- 
kotas and Minnesota — plus Wis- 
consin, Montana and Wyoming. 
Not audited by counties, but in- 
cluded, was mail from Illinois, 
Kansas and Missouri as well as 3 
provinces in Canada. 



Such an overwhelming testi- 
monial of affection makes the 
WNAX-570 talent team and pro- 
gram director blush with joy. They 
know the 660,950 rural and med- 
ium-to-small town families in Big 
Aggie Land have definite ideas 
about radio entertainment. And 
these batches of mail tell them they 
are giving the listeners what they 
want. 

Translated into advertising im- 
portance, that means WNAX-570 
gives national advertisers what they 
want, too. Programs people like 
and listen to — popular shows that 
sell. Your Katz man will line you 
up. 

* TV Penetration Radio Penetration in 
National— 69% Big Aggie Land- 
Big Aggie Land ?8% 
-37% 




WNAX-570 

Yankton, South Dakota 

A Cowles Station. Don D. Sullivan, Advertising Director. Under the 
same management as KVTV Channel ?, Sioux City — Iowa's 2nd 
largest market. CBS Radio 



.PROGRAM SERVICES- 




Page 48 • April 11, 1955 



eral Manufacturing & Engineering Corp., has 
been appointed head of Brown's promotion 
department. 

Beverly Chase, former assistant to the direc- 
tor of program writing at CBS, has been put 
in charge of commercial casting and talent. 
The agency's industrial film department will be 
headed by Jean Thomas, who before joining 
Brown, was head of continuity acceptance in 
the West Coast office of ABC-TV. 

Lee Adams, formerly assistant to the head 
of the tv commercial planning department, 
Biow Co. (now Biow-Beirn-Toigo), will serve 
as special assistant to Mr. Brown. New offices 
at 46 E. 53d St. have also been acquired, Mr. 
Brown said. 

Fremantle Grosses $750,000 

GROSS of over $750,000 in sales of radio and 
tv properties in international markets during 
the 1954-1955 fiscal year, ended Feb. 27, has 
been reported by Fremantle Overseas Radio 
& Tv Inc., New York. Fremantle now has 
four tv shows and 24 radio programs per week 
on the air in 22 countries. Tv accounted for 
60% of the year's dollar volume, the report 
indicated. 

Fremantle also has 12 imported radio shows 
running in the U. S., the report stated. Five 
of the imported shows are in English, the bal- 
ance are in Spanish. 

RCA Victor Record Sales Up 

SALES of all RCA Victor records affected by 
the price reduction announced the first of the 
year rose 30% in the first three months of 
1955 compared to the preceding quarter, Eman- 
uel Sacks, vice president and general manager 
of the RCA Victor Record division, said last 
week. 

Mr. Sacks said the sales rise was particu- 
larly significant because the period followed 
the pre-Christmas months when generally the 
highest volume quarter of the year is registered. 

Salk Serum Results on C-C 

RESULTS of the Salk serum treatment in com- 
batting infantile paralysis will be reported 
tomorrow (Tues.) via closed-circuit tv by Dr. 
William Francis of the U. of Michigan, it was 
announced last week by Morris Mayers, gen- 
eral manager of closed-circuit operations for 
the DuMont Television Network. 

Points of origination are at the U. of Michi- 
gan in the laboratory of the Eli Lilly Co., 
Indianapolis, and in the studios of WABD 
(TV) New York. Audiences in 59 cities in the 
U. S. and five cities in Canada will see the 
telecast — described as the most extensive closed 
circuit ever set up for the medical profession — 
Mr. Mayers said. 

PROGRAM SERVICE PEOPLE 
John A. Thayer Jr., formerly with DuMont Tv 
as account executive, 
appointed to newly- 
created post, sales 
manager, Gotham 
Recording Corp., 
N. Y. 

James Turnbull ap- 
pointed midwest dis- 
trict manager, Co- 
lumbia Records, 
Bridgeport, Conn., 
succeeding Joseph 
Broderick, named 
sales manager of 
Roskin Distributors, 
newly appointed Columbia distributor for Hart- 
ford (Conn.) area. 




MR. THAYER 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



each 




% : Wm/di 



one 



is 









different 



Coconut cream or chewy center . . the marks atop 
quality chocolates can tell you at a glance how 
each differs from the others. Not so easy is 
discerning the vital differences that make quality 
television stations outstanding, each in its 
own character of community service. 

Recognizing these differences (and interpreting 
their merits to national advertisers) is the 
major part of quality representation. It demands 
a caliber of skill individually shaped to each 
station's needs — and the kind of full-time, 
exclusive attention to television that attracts 
quality TV stations such as those listed here. 

It's a distinguished group, each one 

different except in their common appreciation 

of what quality representation means. 

If you share their standards, you may want 

to know more about ours. 



Harrington, Righter and Parsons, Inc. 

New York 
Chicago 
San Francisco 

the only representative devoted only to television 



WAAM 

WBEN-TV 

WFMY-TV 

WTPA 

WDAF-TV 

WHAS-TV 

WTMJ-TV 

WMTW 

WSYR-TV 



Baltimore 

Buffalo 

Greensboro 

Harrisburg 

Kansas City 

Louisville 

Milwaukee 

Mt. Washington 

Syracuse 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 



Page 49 



r 



TRADE ASSNS. 



EISENHOWER TO ADDRESS NARTB SESSION 



May 24 appearance will be 
first 'in person' for a President. 
Record equipment-service ex- 
position in prospect. 

NARTB's convention planners promised at 
week-end that two major precedents would be 
set at the May 22-26 session in Washington — 
the first personal appearance of a President of 
the U. S. at a broadcaster's meeting and the 
largest equipment-service exposition in associa- 
tion history. 

Acceptance of an invitation by President 
Eisenhower led to some juggling of convention 
plans. The President will greet broadcasters at 
11:30 a.m., Tuesday, May 24, immediately 
after presentation of the 1955 Keynote Award 
to Mark Ethridge, WHAS-AM-TV Louisville 
vice president. 

The convention schedule had been left flexible 
to permit a Presidential luncheon address. The 
White House decision to have the President 
greet broadcasters rather than deliver a formal 
address led to belief he will talk informally 
on radio and tv rather than national or inter- 
national topics. The President is known to be 
keenly aware of the impact of radio-tv broad- 
casts. He is the first President to permit radio-tv 
pickups of a Cabinet meeting and news con- 
ferences. 

Another feature of the program on May 24, 
designated Government Day, will be a luncheon 
address by FCC Chairman George C. McCon- 
naughey. Also on the program will be Catherine 
Esther Styles, of Southwest High School in 
Minneapolis, an international exchange student 
from New Zealand, who was one of the four 
Voice of Democracy contest winners. 

The Tuesday session will be opened by the 
Rev. Clayton T. Griswold, executive director, 
Dept. of Radio & Television, Presbyterian 
Church, U.S.A. 

Panel Session Set 

An afternoon panel session will feature mem- 
bers of the FCC and a talk by Chairman Percy 
Priest (D-Tenn.) of the House Interstate & For- 
eign Commerce Committee. NARTB also has 
invited Chairman Warren Magnuson (D-Wash.) 
of the Senate Commerce Committee to address 
broadcasters. 

Concluding event Tuesday will be the annual 

Ohio Assn. of Broadcasters 
Elects H. E. Evans President 

HERBERT E. EVANS, vice president-general 
manager, Peoples Broadcasting Corp., Colum- 
bus, was elected president of Ohio Assn. of 
Radio & Television Broadcasters in a mail run- 
off election held after 
a series of tie votes 
at the OARTB 
March 17-18 meet- 
ing. 

Elected vice presi- 
dents were Paul 
Braden, WPFB Mid- 
dletown, for radio, 
and J. L. Bowden, 
WKBN-TV Youngs- 
town, for television. 
Two new directors 
were elected for a 
three-year term: 
William Steis, WJER 
Dover, for radio, and Allan Land, WHIZ-TV 
Zanesville, for tv. Carlton S. Dargusch Jr., 
Columbus, was elected secretary-treasurer. 

Page 50 • April 11, 1955 




MR. EVANS 



engineering reception, with the Engineering 
Conference opening Wednesday. 

C. E. Arney Jr., NARTB secretary-treasurer 
and convention manager, said the equipment 
and service exposition will be the largest in 
association history. 

A special projects exhibit will be introduced 
this year, with 46 public service organizations 
having accepted the offer of free exhibit space. 
The Advertising Council and NARTB are co- 
operating in this exhibit, which will show the 
part radio and tv are taking in enlisting support 
for non-commercial and non-partisan public 
service campaigns. 

The list of exhibitors leasing space this year 
includes these associate members: 
Equipment Manufacturers: 

Adler Communications Labs; Alford Mfg.; 
Altec Lansing Corp.; Amperex Electronic; 
Product Enginering Div., Ampex Corp.; An- 
drew Corp.; Berlant Assoc.; Blaw-Knox Co.; 
Caterpillar Tractor Co.; Century Lighting; 
CONRAC; Continental Electronics Mfg. Co.; 
Crouse-Hinds Co.; Dage Electric Div. of 
Thompson Products; Allen B. DuMont Labs; 
Electro-Voice Inc.; Elgin Metalformers; General 
Communications; Commercial Equipment Dept., 
General Electric General Precision Lab; Gray 
Research & Development Co.; Harwald Co.; 
Houston-Fearless Corp.; Hughey & Phillips; 
Time Div., International Business Machines 
Corp.; Kay Lab; Kliegl Bros.; Universal Elec- 
tric Stage Lighting Co.; Machlett Labs; Musi- 
color; Nems-Clarke; High Frequency Cable 
Dept., Phelps Dodge Copper Products Corp.; 
Philco Corp.; Prodelin; Broadcast Marketing 
Div., RCA Victor Div.; Raytheon Mfg. Co.; 
Rust Industrial Co.; Broadcast Equipment Div., 
Sarkes Tarzian Inc.; Paul Schafer Custom En- 
gineering; Standard Electronics Corp.; Tele- 
chrome Sales; TelePrompTer Corp.; Tel-Instru- 
ment Co.; Tower Construction Co.; Long Lines 
Dept., AT&T. 
Film Companies: 

ABC Film Syndication; CBS Television Film 
Sales; Flamingo Films; General Teleradio; 
Guild Films Co.; Hollywood Television Service; 
M & A Alexander Productions; MCA-TV Ltd.; 
Minot Tv; NBC Film Div.; National Telefilm 
Assoc.; Official Films; Screen Gems; Sterling 
Television Co.; Television Programs of Amer- 
ica; Unity Television Corp.; Ziv Television 
Programs. 

Transcription Companies: 

A-V Tape Libraries; Harry S. Goodman 
Productions; Lang-Worth Feature Programs; 
RCA Recorded Program Services, RCA Victor 
Div.; SESAC; Standard Radio Trans. Services; 
World Broadcasting System; Frederic W. Ziv 
Co. 

News Services, Service Organizations, Research, 
etc.: 

Associated Press; Television Dept., Interna- 
tional News Service; Bonded Tv Film Service; 
Keystone Broadcasting System; Standard Rate 
& Data Service; Vitapix Corp. 
Station Representatives: 

John Blair & Co.; Headley-Reed Co.; George 
P. Hollingbery Co.; Robert Meeker Assoc.; 
Meeker Tv; Edward Petry & Co.; Weed & Co.; 
Weed Television Corp. 
The Special Projects Exhibitors are: 

American Cancer Society; American Diabetes 
Assn.; American Hearing Society; American 
Heart Assn.; American National Red Cross; 
Arthritis & Rheumatism Foundation; Big Broth- 
ers of America; Boys' Clubs of America; Camp 
Fire Girls; CARE; Common Council for Amer- 
ican Unity; Community Chests & Councils of 
America; Dept. of Defense; Engineering Man- 



power Commission; Federal Civil Defense 
Adm.; 4-H Clubs; Forest Fire Prevention; Girl 
Scouts of the U. S. A.; Ground Observer Corps; 
Joint Committee on Educational Television; 
National Assn. for Mental Health; National 
Citizens Commission for the Public Schools; 
National Citizens Committee for Educational 
Television; National Education Assn.; National 
Foundation for Infantile Paralysis; National 
Guard; National League for Nursing; National 
Safety Council; National Society for Crippled 
Children & Adults; National Society for the 
Prevention of Blindness; National Tuberculosis 
Assn.; President's Committee on Employment 
of the Physically Handicapped; Religion in 
America Life; Star Spangled Banner Flag House 
Assn.; United Cerebral Palsy; United Negro 
College Fund; United Service Organizations; 
U. S. Air Force; U. S. Army; U. S. Coast 
Guard; U. S. Information Agency; U. S. Marine 
Corps; U. S. Navy; U. S. Savings Bonds Divi- 
sion, Treasury Dept.; YWCA. 

Hellman to Direct 
TvB Sales Promotion 

APPOINTMENT of Gordon A. Hellman, di- 
rector of CBS-TV network sales presentations, 
as director of sales promotion for Television 
Bureau of Advertising, effective May 2, is being 
announced today 
(Monday) by Oliver 
Treyz, TvB presi- 
dent. 

"With TvB's oper- 
ational phase now in 
full swing," Mr. 
Treyz said, "the post 
of director of sales 
promotion assumes 
key importance in 
helping achieve the 
bureau's objective, 
which is to secure 
for television a 
greater share of ad- 
vertisers' appropriations. Mr. Hellman comes 
to TvB from CBS Television where for the 
past four years he has served as director of 
sales presentations." 

Community Broadcasters Assn. 
Plans Lunch at NARTB Meet 

CLASS IV (local) stations have been invited 
by Community Broadcasters Assn. to hold the 
organization's first annual meeting, Monday, 
May 23, during the NARTB convention in 
Washington. Membership chairmen will be 
named in each state and a membership pro- 
gram is planned prior to convention time. 

The station group is planning a petition to 
the FCC asking 1 kw fulltime with engineer- 
ing and legal work to show their economic 
problems caused by crowding of the spectrum. 
A dutch treat lunch will be held at the Shore- 
ham Hotel, followed by a business meeting. 
F. E. Lackey, WHOP Hopkinsville, Ky., is 
Community's acting chairman. 

District directors have been elected as fol- 
lows: Harold H. Meyer, WPOR Portland, Me.; 
John R. Henzel, WHDL Olean, N. Y.; Frank 
R. Smith, WBVP Beaver Falls, Pa.; Earl M. 
Key, WKEY Covington, Va.; John W. Jacobs, 
WDUN Gainsville, Ga.; W. M. McKinney, 
KELD El Dorado, Ark.; Mr. Lackey; Robert 
T. Mason, WMRN Marion, Ohio; Merrill 
Lindsay, WSOY Decatur, 111.; Ben B. Sanders, 
KICD Spencer, Iowa; John Alexander, KODY 
North Platte, Neb.; David Morris, KNUZ 
Houston; Ken Nybo, KBMY Billings, Mont.; \- 
Lee Little, KTUC Tucson, Ariz.; Lee Bishop, 
KORE Eugene, Ore. 




HELLMAN 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting I! 



J?L mazing how many Boston families take 
WEEI to their hearts. Amazing and a matter 
of fact.* For WEEI is welcomed by more 
different families than any other radio 
station (network or local) heard in the entire 
metropolitan Boston area. 

And that goes for the morning period, the 
afternoon period, the nighttime period, total 
day and total week! Just look at the 
figures for WEEFs total week lead. WEEI 



reaches 88.6% (virtually 9 out of 10) of 
all radio homes in the area . . . and is the 
only radio station reaching more than 
800,000 families (60,800 more than the 
nearest competitor)! 

Amazing indeed. Must be our magnetic 
personalities. For information about any of 
them (note sampler below), call CBS 
Radio Spot Sales or WEEI ... the most 
listened-to radio station in Boston. 




*Long established fact 
. . . but this is the latest from 
the new Cumulative Pulse 
Audience report on metropolitan 
Boston area listening 
(Pulse CPA 12/54, released 
March 7, 1955). 



NBC RADIO TELLS PLANS FOR 'MONITOR/ 
ITS 40-HOUR WEEKEND PROGRAM SERVICE 



Network executives foresee new 

advertisers and new listeners to 

NBC last week officially revealed the insides 
of its plans for Monitor, the sweeping 40-hour 
weekend program which it envisions as a new 
type of national service to lure new listeners 
and new advertisers to network radio [B*T, 
April 4]. 

To start June 12 with a Sunday afternoon 
hour-long simulcast, the program — NBC prefers 
the word "service" — will offer a stream of 
information and entertainment material from 
8 a.m. Saturdays until midnight Sundays. 
Matching the flexibility of the programming, a 
sales plan encompassing one-minute, half-min- 
ute, and six-second announcements will be em- 
ployed on the series. 

Although the programming and sales essen- 
tials of Monitor had been reported earlier, 
further details were unwrapped by NBC Presi- 
dent Sylvester L. (Pat) Weaver Jr., Executive 
Vice President Robert W. Sarnoff and Monitor 
Executive Producer James Fleming at a news 
luncheon in New York Thursday. 

They voiced confidence that NBC affiliates 
would clear time for the plan, although not 
necessarily in whole. President Weaver noted 
that the stations, including those owned by 
NBC, have certain advertiser commitments of 
their own which they could hardly be expected 
to yield in order to take corresponding portions 
of Monitor. But the conviction as expressed by 
Station Relations Vice President Harry Ban- 
nister was that all affiliates would carry the 
program in whole or in part, and that "event- 
ually they will carry most of it." 

Mr. Sarnoff emphasized that "our immediate 
interest" is in option time, but that "we hope 
they'll add more and more." 

It was learned, meanwhile, that NBC's 
present thinking in terms of financial success 
was based wholly on option time. Reminded 
that in connection with NBC-TV's Today pro- 
gram the original estimate was that the show 
would need to be 40% sold in order to become 
profitable, one official said the percentage on 
Monitor would be considerably higher. With 
Monitor 14 hours of option time are involved: 
on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 12 noon, from 
3 to 6 p.m., and from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m., and 
on Sundays from 3 to 6 p.m. and from 7 to 10 
p.m. 

No Expansion Planned 

There was no indication the network plans to 
extend the Monitor concept to the rest of the 
week. Mr. Weaver noted that, although plans 
on this point were necessarily not that far ad- 
vanced, if Monitor pays off as well as NBC 
hopes, then similar programming may be 
adapted for insertion in certain hours here and 
there during weekdays. 

Authorities declined to estimate the produc- 
tion costs of Monitor, except to say it would 
exceed the total for the network's present sus- 
taining programs plus those of the o & o sta- 
tions. But the total cost to advertisers was 
delineated as follows: 

• Minute announcements will cost $1,000 
each. 

• Half-minute announcements, to be sold in 
minimum packages of four per weekend, will 
cost $3,000 for the four. 

• Six-second billboards, or "posters," to be 
sold in a minimum batch of 10 per weekend, 
will cost $3,000 for the minimum package. 

These are figures for announcements falling 
between 8 a.m. and midnight. Those falling 



program format as attracting new 

radio on Saturdays and Sundays. 

between midnight and 8 a.m. are at half this 
rate. These also are gross prices, subject to 
weekly frequency discounts varying up to 10% 
for 10 or more minutes of announcements per 
weekend, and annual frequency discounts rang- 
ing up to 20% for 250 or more announce- 
ments per year. 

Additionally, up to Oct. 1, there will be a 
special Introductory Dividend Plan in lieu of 
discounts. This means an advertiser ordering 
and scheduling at least 20 minutes of announce- 
ments (in any combination) before Oct. 1 will 
receive, instead of discounts, 10 minutes of an- 
nouncements which will also be scheduled be- 
fore Oct. 1. "Dividend" announcements will be 
in the same form as, and proportionate to, 
those in the qualifying purchase. 

Positions Flexible 

Authorities said it was expected that at first 
advertisers would be able to position their 
participations within a given half-hour, but that 
as more and more announcements are sold the 
sales will of necessity become more and more 
a run-of-schedule arrangement. 

From the affiliates' standpoint, it was learned, 
compensation for commercials sold in Monitor 
will be substantially that used in the case of 
participations in NBC Radio's present "Three 
Plan" — approximately at the rate of one- 
twelfth of the station's daytime hourly rate for 
those in the 8 a.m. -to-midnight period, and one- 
half that rate for those in the midnight-8 a.m. 
segment. 

Each hour of Monitor will include, the net- 
work said, the following for station sale: two 
one-minute availabilities not subject to network 
recapture; plus provision for a five-minute local 
cut-in, scheduled on the half-hour; plus a sta- 
tion break every half-hour. For network sale 
there will be nine minutes of commercial time. 

Orders for network participations in option 
time periods, NBC said, must include the full 
network; on all other periods they must include 
the full available network: "NBC will quote 
prices only for such networks, and will not 
quote any station-by-station prices." 

The broad-scoped material envisioned for 
Monitor will originate from a new, $150,000 
"push-button listening post on the world," to be 
designated NBC Radio Central, now under con- 
struction in the RCA Building in New York. 
Material will range from "one line jokes to 
20-minute special pickups". — presided over at 
NBC Radio Central by "communicators" (not 
yet selected) who will work in four-hour time 
blocks and be backed in each case by a team 
consisting of a name disc jockey, an experienced 
newscaster, a sports editor, and writers and 
program development specialists. The backbone 
will be news, sports, time signals, weather, local 
and special features. 

NBC said a "typical hour" on the weekend 
service might include the following (through- 
out the program there will be regular "forward- 
indexing" of highlights to be presented during 
the rest of the day): 

"The first segment of a trip through Paris 
with Monitor's roving European correspondent. 
(Succeeding segments would be positioned 
throughout the rest of the day.) 

"A dramatic highlight from a current hit 
Broadway play or movie. 

"Live or taped appearances by people at the 
top of the news that weekend. 

"Comedy of all types, including live and pre- 



recorded routines by stars from all fields of 
show business; jokes and stories. 

"A Monitor exclusive — which might be a 
dive with the atomic-powered submarine, the 
Nautilus; firing a rocket at White Sands, or 
visiting Birdland, New York's Mecca of jazz. 

"A behind-the-scenes visit with a top star of 
Broadway or Hollywood. 

"Plus, of course, Monitor's basic news, time, 
weather, sports and local features." 

President Weaver, explaining why NBC is 
convinced Monitor will work, said, "You'll 
never get a 20 rating in radio again," but that 
the new weekend arrangement was conceived 
with the plan of bringing old and new adver- 
tisers into radio by giving them 50-60% cumu- 
lative audiences. With 50-60-70% of the 
homes, on a cumulative basis, "we'll be back in 
business," he assured. 

But he said he did not expect Monitor to take 
audience away from television. Rather, he said, 
NBC hopes that Monitor will increase NBC's 
share of the existing radio audience — to get 
increasing tune-in from other stations and to 
attract people who are neither listening nor 
watching. But he made plain that its program- 
ming will not be "secondary listening" material 
calculated to reach those who primarily are 
doing something else but listening to the radio 
at the same time. It will be both a national 
medium and a mass medium, he said. 

It also, he asserted, will promote features in 
other media — outstanding articles in magazines, 
for example, thereby perhaps advancing the 
sales of those magazines. 

Overall, he continued, it will be a departure 
from the fixed formats that radio has generally 
followed up to now; the time devoted to any 
given segment will be determined by what seems 
the correct amount of time needed for that 
segment: "the content will determine the form, 
instead of having the form determine the con- 
tent." 

NBC Radio Appoints Meade 
'Monitor' Project Director 

EVERARD MEADE, former vice president 
and radio-tv director of Young & Rubicam, has 
been retained by NBC on a temporary basis to 
coordinate the various phases of NBC Radio's 
new weekend, 40- 
hour Monitor pro- 
gram [B»T, April 4] 
(also see story on.J 
this page). 

He already has 
assumed his new 
duties, it was learn- 
ed last week, with 
the title of project 
officer of Monitor. 

Mr. Meade retired 
from Y & R in 1953 
and has since been 
living at Charlottes- 
ville, Va., where he 
has been lecturing in the Graduate School of 
Business Administration at the U. of Virginia. 

CBS-TV Liberalizes 1 
EMP Discount Plan 

REVISION in the discount structure of CBS- 
TV's Extended Market Plan [B«T, Nov. 29, 
1954] was announced last week by Terrence 
McGuirk, EMP sales manager, as part of a 
move to make the plan more attractive to ad- j 




MR. MEADE 



vertisers. 

Under the new discount structure of the plan, 



Page 52 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



Is This 




"COVERAGE"? 



THIS HALF 



NEBRASKA'S 



OTHER 

BIG MARKET. 





WKZO — KALAMAZOO 

WKZO-TV — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 

WJEF — GRAND RAPIDS 

WJEF-FM — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 

KOLN — LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 

KCLN-TY — LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 

Associated with 
WMBD — PEORIA, ILLINOIS 



OU'RE HALF NAKED IN NEBRASKA COVERAGE 
IF YOU DON'T REACH LINCOLN-LAND — 



42 rich counties with a population of 642,250 — 

207,050 families. KOLN-TV reaches over 

125,000 families unduplicated by any other station! 

The KOLN-TV tower is 75 miles from Omaha! 
This Lincoln-Land location is farther removed from 
the Omaha market than is Cincinnati from Dayton, 
Buffalo from Rochester or Lancaster from Philadelphia. 



KOLN-TV 



COVERS LINCOLN-LAND— NEBRASKA'S OTHER BIG MARKET 



CHANNEL 10 • 316,000 WATTS • LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 
ABC DUM0NT 

c4very.-Knodely 3nc, Cxclu&ive National JlepreAentativei 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 53 



NETWORKS 



which was established to extend tv network 
service to small market stations, an advertiser 
using 20 and more stations earns a discount 
of 15%. The old plan provided for a 10% 
discount — the only one — for using the full list. 

Mr. McGuirk said the revised schedule makes 
the small market station even more attractive as 
a supplementary coverage purchase and is flex- 
ible in application. The new table, he said, sets 
up the following discounts: less than five sta- 
tions, no discount; five to nine stations, 5%; 10 
to 14 stations, 7V2%; 15 to 19 stations, 10%, 
and 20 and more stations, 15%. 

Since the introduction of EMP last January, 
Mr. McGuirk reported, 30 advertisers have 
signed contracts under the plan. 

CBS-TV Promotes 
Oppenheim, Foster 

AS PART of a departmental reorganization at 
CBS-TV New York, Charles Oppenheim, direc- 
tor of press information, last week was named 
director of information services for the network. 

Mr. Oppenheim will be responsible for the 
direction and planning of informational serv- 
ices and for the coordination of press activities 
in New York and Hollywood. 

Michael Foster, publicity manager, was ap- 




FOSTER 

pointed manager of press relations. He will be 
in charge of press contacts both in the metro- 
politan area and out of town. 

Hank Warner, operations manager, will con- 
tinue to direct the program publicity staff and 
be responsible for press releases. 

Plans to add a separate unit which will con- 
centrate exclusively on special program proj- 
ects also are being considered. 

Elliott Named Adv. Dir. 
Of MBS-Teleradio Film 

APPOINTMENT of Robert Elliott as director 
of advertising for Mutual Broadcasting System 
and the Film Div. of General Teleradio Inc. 
was announced last week by Robert A. Schmid, 
vice president of 
MBS and General 
Teleradio. Mr. El- 
liott fills the post 
vacated by the death 
of James S. Tyler 
[B »T, Oct. 2 5, 
1954]. 

Mr. Schmid also 
announced that Ar- 
nold Roston, art di- 
rector of Mutual, 
has assumed addi- 
tional" responsibili- 
ties as associate di- 
rector of advertising and promotion. 

Mr. Elliott has been a copy supervisor at 
Ruthrauff & Ryan, New York and promotion 
copy chief of CBS Radio and CBS-TV. 

Page 54 • April 11, 1955 




MR. ELLIOTT 




AT ABC's two-day meeting of top officials of the company's nine owned radio and 
television stations in New York last Monday and Tuesday were (I to r): 

Seated: Jasen Rabinovitz, assistant controller; Harold L. Morgan Jr., vice president 
and controller; Leonard H. Goldenson, president, American Broadcasting-Paramount 
Theatres, and Robert E. Kintner, president, ABC. 

Standing, first row: Ted Oberfelder, vice president and general manager, WABC-TV 
New York; Harold Christian, vice president for WXYZ Detroit; Michael A. Renault, 
general manager, WABC New York; James H. Connolly, vice president in charge of 
San Francisco office; James Riddell, president and general manager of WXYZ-AM-TV. 

Standing, second row; Simon B. Siegel, treasurer, AB-PT; Donald Coyle, director of 
research; David Sacks, sales manager, KGO-AM-TV San Francisco; John Pival, vice 
president for WXYZ-TV; Trevor Adams, sales manager, WABC-TV New York, and 
Ernest Lee Jahncke Jr., vice president and assistant to the president of ABC. 

Last row: Ardien B. Rodner, program manager, WABC-TV New York; Elton Rule, 
sales manager, KABC-TV Los Angeles; Frank Marx, vice president in charge of engi- 
neering; Charles W. Godwin, director of ABC Radio network station relations, and 
John S. Hansen, manager, KABC Los Angeles. 

Also attending the sessions which discussed station improvement methods were Sterling 
C. Quinlan, vice president in charge of WBKB (TV) Chicago; Matthew Vieracker, treas- 
urer, ABC Central Div., and Selig Seligman, general manager, KABC-TV Los Angeles. 



NBC Names Children's 
Program Review Board 

ESTABLISHMENT of a three-member Chil- 
dren's Program Review Committee by NBC was 
revealed by Joseph V. Heffernan, network 
financial vice pres- 
ident, during testi- 
mony before the 
Senate Juvenile De- 
linquency Subcom- 
mittee holding hear- 
ings in Washington 
(see story page 79). 

Chairman of the 
new group, set up 
to maintain "high" 
standards in NBC 
programs, is Mrs. 
Mildred McAffee 
Horton, a vice pres- 
ident of the National 
Council of the Churches of Christ in the 
U. S. A., NBC director and formerly president 
of Wellesley College and wartime head of the 
WAVES. 

Other members are Dr. Frances Horwich, 
known for her NBC-TV program Ding Dong 
School and as an educator, and Dr. Robert 
Goldenson, assistant professor of psychology 
at Hunter College. 

Mr. Heffernan simultaneously disclosed the 
appointment of Dr. Horwich to the newly- 
established position, supervisor of children's 
programs. 





DR. HORWICH 



DR. GOLDENSON 



MRS. HORTON 



NBC, ABC NABET 
APPROVE PACTS 

AGREEMENTS on new contracts covering 
technical employes at NBC and ABC were 
reached last week in New York by the networks 
and the National Assn. of Broadcast Employes 
& Technicians, ending persistent threats of 
a strike [B*T, March 28]. 

The acceptance of the contract at NBC was 
in jeopardy until Thursday afternoon when ac- 
cord was reached in the face of reports that 
a strike would begin at 2 p.m. EST. ABC 
employes earlier had voted approval of the 
pact. 

It was reported the contract will call for 
an immediate 8% wage boost, with another 
2% increase in 18 months. The contracts expire 
Feb. 1, 1958. 



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DELAWARE 7-4014 



9842 LEMMON 
DALLAS, TEXAS 
ELMHURST 638C 




THE historical series, You Are There, has 
run the gamut of broadcast presentation. 
Starting on CBS Radio in 1949 as CBS 
Is There, it was transferred to television 
about two years ago as a live program, 
emanating from New York. Last October, 
while continuing the live series, CBS-TV 
began filming future programs. The live 
telecasts were discontinued at the end of 
1954, and the filmed shows started with the 
Jan. 2 program. 

With the completion of the 13th You Are 
There film in New York in December, Wil- 
liam Dozier, CBS-TV executive producer 
who had handled the video series since its 
inception, was transferred to Hollywood and 
promoted to director of CBS-TV network 
programs from that city. Now the program 
has followed him. On April 3, at the Hal 
Roach Studios in Culver City, the cameras 
began shooting "The Completion of the 
First Transcontinental Railroad" for tele- 
casting later in the You Are There schedule. 

Most pleased when it was decided that 
the program would remain under his super- 
vision, Mr. Dozier declares, "in all lack of 
humility," that there is more of him in the 
series than of anyone else, as he was re- 
sponsible for devising the program's tv for- 
mat. The success of the tv version of You 
Are There, he believes, stems from the main 
change made in the transition from radio 
to television, a change he freely admits was 
dictated by the expediency and limitations 
of the video medium. 

This change was to switch the program's 



YOU ARE THERE' 
EVOLVES TO FILM 

FROM RADIO TO LIVE TV TO CELLULOID IN 7 YEARS 



AT TOP: Director Bernard Girard sets up a 
take for You Are There. Dick Dixon, as- 
sistant director, is in the background. 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



emphasis from the event as such to the 
human beings behind it. On radio, the se- 
ries dramatized the events with broad strokes 
of action, a battle being depicted in terms of 
guns, troops and descriptions that many 
listeners found reminiscent of past history 
lessons. 

In tv, Mr. Dozier explains, his idea was 
to spotlight the human element, to show the 
forces that motivated the chief protagonists 
and through them to give the viewer an in- 
sight into the social and political climate of 
the time. This reasoning was born of ne- 
cessity and "I can't take any credit for a 
flash of genius," Mr. Dozier declares. 

You Are There started on CBS-TV Feb. 
1, 1953, with America's Electric Light & 
Power Companies, through N. W. Ayer & 
Son, sponsoring it every other week. After 
four or five months, Prudential Insurance 
Co. of America, through Calkins & Holden, 
took over the alternating week. Both spon- 
sors have continued with the program ever 
since. 

When the program first went on tv, "we 
weren't sure of its success and, as the cost 
factor was important, we didn't even con- 
sider film," Mr. Dozier says. As it prog- 
ressed, though, and won its audience, the 
network and sponsor executives started 
thinking it would be nice to have the shows 
on celluloid to insure their permanency. By 
its nature, this program is ageless and will 
never be any older than it is today, he 
opines. 

Several reasons contributed to switching 
the program, after approximately 85 live 
telecasts, to film. There were numerous re- 
quests from schools, libraries, teachers and 
others, for prints. The network and spon- 
sors were forced to reply that there were 
none available because the unions wouldn't 
allow mass distribution of kinescopes. This 
demand for prints can now be satisfied, as 
the sponsors have long satisfied requests 
from educators by providing them with 
teaching aids for each event. 

Additionally, the sponsors want You Are 
There on film as a public relations asset. 
Both firms, at the moment, plan to buy 16 
mm prints and present them to libraries. 
Each sponsor, far-flung in having local sub- 
scribers and offices, can greatly enhance its 
public relations by buying a couple of hun- 
dred prints for, say, $6,000, and donating 



them to groups in the areas to which they 
supply electricity or maintain insurance of- 
fices, Mr. Dozier suggests. 

Still another reason lies in CBS-TV's view 
of the syndication possibilities. With this 
in mind, CBS-TV, which owns the package 
and sells the sponsors the first network show- 
ing only, has absorbed the added cost of 
filming. 

Cost factor, important at the inception 
of the program, is still important. Estimated 
at roughly $24,000 per live show, the initial 
switch from live to film in New York raised 
the budget by about $6,000. It costs about 
$3,500 more to make a film in Hollywood 
than it does in New York, primarily because 
union scales are proportionately higher. 
Thus the total added cost of the current film- 
ing schedule amounts to about $9,500 per 
film. 

Mr. Dozier had misgivings in two areas 
over bringing You Are There to Hollywood: 
acting and research. In regard to the acting 
he wasn't sure of the same reservoir of good 
talent in the series' price range. In New 
York, he had become accustomed to theatre- 
minded actors who wanted a good part, over 
and above star billing and a large salary. As 
to research, he doubted that the west coast 
sources could be as ample as those in New 
York. The research done on each program 
is so extensive, consisting of photographs 




PRODUCER WILLIAM DOZIER 

April 11, 1955 • Page 63 



or reproduced facsimiles of the actual char- 
acters, scripts, sets, props, costumes, etc., 
that to be on the safe side, You Are There 
maintains a New York liaison office in 
which two girls implement the requests of 
the Hollywood production end. 

Happily, after six films, Mr. Dozier finds 
that there need be no concern about west 
coast actors wanting to play good roles. 
There continues to be no star billing and the 
cast is, as always, listed at the end in order 
of appearance. Additionally, there is no 
need for concern on the production and re- 
search end, because, Mr. Dozier emphasizes, 
"we are achieving even a greater degree of 
perfection." 

When you start filming, according to Mr. 
Dozier, the general tendency is to open it 
up and enlarge your scope. He, executive 
producer Ben Feiner, producer Jim Fonda 
and director Bernard Girard have decided 
not to yield to such temptations. While spe- 
cific sets may be given more dimension, the 
human quality is still the most important. 

As further insurance against any loss, 
chief narrator Walter Cronkite flies to Holly- 
wood twice for every group of 1 3 films. The 
shooting schedule calls for rehearsal on 
Monday and Tuesday, followed by three 
days before the camera, maintaining two 
months between the shooting and actual air 
time. Research, though, has already started 
on "Bannister Wins the Mile Run," to be 
telecast Nov. 20. 

Subject matter is decided by Messrs. 
Dozier, Feiner and Fonda and then recom- 
mended to the sponsors. The radio version, 
which Mr. Dozier had never heard until the 
tv project was being discussed and he played 
back some tapes, repeated some subjects 
three and four times over the two-year pe- 
riod. Tv, to date, has done this with only 
one program. "The Rise of Adolf Hitler" 
was telecast live May 10, 1953, repeated live 
Feb. 28, 1954, and is being filmed for the 
April 24 program. This, Mr. Dozier ex- 
plains, has been due only to mail response, 
as he has several hundred potential subjects 
on file. 

It is by design, not accident, that about 
half of the subjects deal with America, with 
the remaining half divided among foreign 
nations. About one-third of the programs 
concern themselves with women. 

Apart from this division of subject matter, 




SWITCH to Film of You Are There enables 
in this scene from "The Completion of the 

the event must have a specific day to which 
it can be hooked. Letters from viewers have 
requested programs on women's suffrage and 
prohibition, but, Mr. Dozier explains, these 
were phases, not events. The Jan. 23 pro- 
gram, "Susan B. Anthony is Tried for Vot- 
ing," dealt with the last day of the trial, 




AT LEFT: Chief narrator Walter Cronkite. AT RIGHT: Harry Marble (r), newsman-com- 
mentator, goes over lines with actor Jeff Morrow, who portrays President Abraham 
Lincoln in You Are There's upcoming "The Emancipation Proclamation." 

Page 64 • April 11, 1955 



the program to incorporate the actual train 
First Transcontinental Railroad." 

which provided the necessary hook. A pos- 
sible program might deal with the repeal of 
the 18th amendment, which would be the 
hook on which to hang prohibition. 

Mail, Mr. Dozier reveals, is received from 
all types of viewers. Writers to the program 
include 5th grade students, clergymen, 
housewives, teachers and self-styled experts 
of certain historical periods. The greatest 
mail response resulted from "The Torment 
of Beethoven," the program's first film, tele- 
cast on Jan. 2. 

Part of the fun in doing You Are There, 
Mr. Dozier enthuses, is the discovery that 
many of the best-known "facts" of history 
are only myths. For example, he says, 
Queen Isabella didn't pawn her jewels to 
finance Christopher Columbus. General Lee 
did not offer his sword to General Grant at 
Appomattox. "The Gettysburg Address" re- 
ceived a mild smattering of applause, not 
dead silence. 

To be committed to celluloid are such up- 
coming programs as "P. T. Barnum Presents 
Jenny Lind," "The Emancipation Procla- 
mation," "The Final Performance of Sarah 
Bernhardt," Napoleon's Return From 
Elba," "Discovery of Radium," "The Hero- 
ism of Louis Braille" and "The Sale of Man- 
hattan Island." 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 




To convince your "critics" 



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Complete information about the 
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demonstration will show why it passes 
any audition test. Ask your Kodak 
Audio-Visual Dealer, or send coupon. 




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'Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 65 



HOW FILM FARE 



B»FS CONTINUING SURVEY OF THE FIELD SHOWS THAT IT NOW 



FILMED television programs account for 36.8% of the total pro - 
gram air time of the average U. S. television station, according 
to replies to a B«T survey conducted last month. Post card ques- 
tionnaires were sent to all 422 tv stations then on the air and 139 
usable replies were received by tabulation time. It showed that, 
on the average, non-network film programming takes up 30.4% 
of the station's time. 

Data supplied by the four tv networks revealed that 13.3% of 
all video network programming is on film. Since the stations 
reported an average of 47.9% of their time is devoted to network 
programs, then 6.4% (47.9% of 13.3%) of station time goes to 
network film shows. This figure, added to the 30.4% devoted to 
non-network film, gives a total of 36.8% or 31 hours and 38 min- 
utes a week in which the average tv station is telecasting filmed 
programs, either projected locally or received from the network. 

Of the three classes of stations — interconnected network affili- 
ates, non-interconnected affiliates and stations not affiliated with 
any tv network — the non-interconnected network affiliates devote 
the largest percentage of their air time to non-network films: 53.2% 
as compared with 51.4% for the non-network stations. The non- 
interconnected affiliate gets 18.0% of his program hours from the 
network, originating 28.8% of his air time locally. The non-affiliate 
naturally has no network programs, and originates 48.6% of his 
program hours himself. 

The interconnected network affiliate divides his programming 
time half to network programs (50.7%), a fifth to local live 
shows (20.4%) and three-tenths to non-network film program- 
ming (28.9%). Of his network program hours, seven-eighths are 
filled with programs received direct, via either coaxial cable or 
microwave radio relay, only one-eighth by kinescope for delayed 
broadcast. In comparison with B»T's earlier surveys the March 
1955 study shows more network programs received simultaneously 
with the original telecast, fewer by kine, a natural consequence of 
the spread of AT&T tv transmission facilities which have enabled 
more and more stations to become connected into tv network cir- 
cuits and which also have made possible more simultaneous pro- 
gram networking, with less time-sharing of facilities among the 
networks required. 

Comparing the current statistics with those reported in June 
and December of 1953 [B»T July 13, 1953, Jan. 11, 1954] shows 
both types of network affiliated stations doing more programming 
now than they did in 1953, while the non-network stations report 
on the average more hours of tv programming than they had in 
December 1953 but fewer hours than in June of that year. Pro- 
portion of time given to network programs by non-interconnected 
affiliates averaged less this year than in 1953, and about the same 
for interconnected affiliates. 

Both groups of network affiliates are devoting more hours to 
non-network films this year than in 1953, but about the same 
percentage of their total air time. The non-affiliates are giving 
filmed programs more time than in December 1953 but less than 
in June of that year. All three types of tv stations are devoting 
more time to films made specially for tv than formerly. 

Interconnected network affiliates are given about the same pro- 
portion of their broadcast hours to locally originated programs 
as at the time of the previous B«T surveys. Both the non-inter- 
connected affiliates and the non-affiliated stations have increased 
their hours of local shows per week, which now occupy a slightly 
larger percentage of their total program time. 

The network reports do not show any consistent trend, so far as 
(Continued on page 68) 

Page 66 • April 11, 1955 



THE TV BROADCAST WEEK 

FILM— NETWORK— LOCAL 



NON-NETWORK 
FILM PROGRAMS 



Total Non-Network 
Film 



Specially 
Made for Tv 

Made for Theatrical 
Showing 



NETWORK 

ORIGINATED 

PROGRAMS 



Total Network 
Programs 

Off Coaxial 

Cable or Microwave 

Kine 



LOCAL LIVE 
PROGRAMS 



TOTAL PROGRAMS 



Average Total 
Hours and Minutes 
on Air Per Week 



* Figures for all stations not available for previous years. 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



IS FARING IN TV 

CCUPIES MORE THAN A THIRD OF THE TOTAL BROADCAST TIME 





Interconnected 


Non-Interconnected 


Non-Network 




1 


Network Affiliates 


Network 


Affiliates 


Stations 


All Stations 






% of Total 




% of Total 




% of Total 




% of Total 


rvey 


No. Hours 


Hours 


No. Hours 


Hours 


No. Hours 


Hours 


No. Hours 


Hours 


ates 


Per Week 


On Air 


Per Week 


On Air 


Per Week 


On Air 


Per Week 


On Air 


3/55 


27:11 


28.9% 


31:50 


53.2% 


21:27 


51.4% 


27:02 


30.4% 


2/53 


23:38 


29.7% 


22:34 


48.3% 


18:51 


52.6% 


* 


* 


6/53 


25:37 


27.3% 


29:01 


54.2% 


31:00 


60.8% 


* 


* 


3/55 


12:26 


13.2% 


13:33 


22.6% 


8:51 


21.2% 


12:12 


1 3.8% 


2/53 


9:48 


12.3% 


8:33 


1 8.3% 


7:36 


21.2% 


* 


* 


6/53 


9:27 


1 0.2% 


11:41 


21.5% 


8:43 


17.7% 


* 


* 


3/55 


14:45 


1 5.7% 


18:17 


30.6% 


12:36 


30.2% 


14:50 


16.6% 


2/53 


13:50 


17.4% 


14:01 


30.0% 


11:15 


31.4% 


* 


* 


6/53 


16:10 


17.1% 


17:20 


32.7% 


22:17 


43.1% 


* 


* 










3/55 


47:45 


50.7% 


10:48 


1 8.0% 






42:26 


47.9% 


2/53 


39:31 


49.6% 


11:12 


24.0% 






* 


* 


6/53 


48:11 


51.6% 


12:37 


23.4% 






* 


* 


3/55 


41:20 


43.9% 










36:16 


41.0% 


2/53 


31:57 


* 40.1% 










* 


* 


6/53 


37:42 


40.4% 










* 


* 


3/55 


6:25 


6.8% 


10:48 


1 8.0% 






6:10 


6.9% 


2/53 


7:34 


9.5% 


11:12 


24.0% 






* 


* 


6/53 


10:29 


1 1 .2% 


12:37 


23.4% 






* 


* 










3/55 


19:16 


20.4% 


17:14 


28.8% 


20:16 


48.6% 


19:14 


21.7% 


2/53 


16:31 


20.7% 


12:55 


27.7% 


17:01 


47.4% 


* 


* 


6/53 


19:46 


21.1% 


11:53 


22.4% 


19:57 


39.2% 


* 


* 










3/55 


94:12 




59:52 




41:43 




88:42 


1 00.0% 


12/53 


79:49 




46:41 




35:52 




* 


* 


6/53 


93:34 




53:31 




50:57 




* 


* 



Broadcasting • Telecasting A P ril n > 1955 * Pa E e 67 



a division of program hours between live 
and film is concerned. CBS-TV and DuMont 
are devoting more time to film programming 
than they did in 1953. ABC-TV and NBC- 
TV report exactly the opposite. 

Percentagewise, however, ABC-TV, CBS- 
TV and DuMont all show a larger propor- 
tion of their total program hours given over 
to filmed programs than in December 1953. 
NBC-TV alone showed a decrease. 

NBC-TV's drop — from 14 hours and 
three minutes to eight hours even, and from 
20.8% of this network's total program time 
to 8.5% — was enough to outweigh increased 
time for filmed shows reported by the other 
tv networks. The combined figures show 
that all four networks are now devoting 29 
hours and 30 minutes a week to filmed pro- 
gramming, or 13.3% of their total weekly 
program hours, down from 17.0% in De- 
cember 1953 and from 18.5% in June of 
that year. Network program time devoted 
to live shows has concurrently risen from 
81.5% in June of 1953 to 83.0% in Decem- 
ber of that year and 86.7% in March 1955. 



FILM ON THE NETWORKS 



ABC-TV 
CBS-TV 
DuMONT 

NBC-TV 

ALL TV 
NETWORKS 



Survey 
Dates 

3/55 
12/53 
6/53 

3/55 
12/53 
6/53 

3/55 
12/53 
6/53 

3/55 
12/53 
6/53 

3/55 
12/53 
6/53 



No. Hours 
Per Week 

9:30 

14:45 
13:45 



FILM 

% of Total 
Hours 
On Air 

40.4% 
38.6% 
47.8% 



LIVE 



11:30 

5:50 
8:00 

0:30 




8:00 
14:03 
12:20 

29:30 
34:38 
34:05 



13.7% 
8.2% 
13.3% 

2.5% 



8.5% 
20.8% 
18.1% 

13.3% 
17.0% 
18.5% 



No. Hours 


% of Total 


Per Week 


Hours 


On Air 


14:00 


59.6% 


23:30 


61.4% 


15:00 


52.2% 


72:30 


86.3% 


65:55 


91.8% 


52:00 


86.7% 


19:45 


97.5% 


27:30 


100.0% 


27:30 


100.0% 


86:45 


91.5% 


53:23 


79.2% 


55:40 


81.9% 


193:00 


86.7% 


170:18 


83.0% 


158:10 


81.5% 



TOTAL 

No. Hours 
Per Week 

23:30 
38:15 
28:45 

84:00 
71:45 
60:00 

20:15 

27:30 
27:30 

94:45 
67:26 

68:00 

222:30 
204:56 

184:15 



CHANGING TERRY'S TUNE 

CARTOON-MAKER ENTERED TV WITH CAUTION, NOW IS A FERVID BOOSTER 



ONE of the die-hard skeptics of television 
a few years ago was Paul Terry, president 
of Terrytoons Inc., New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Today, he's one of the medium's most fervid 
boosters. 

This enthusiast was soberly cautious 
when his famed Terrytoon films were re- 
leased for television. Today, he is so con- 
vinced of the medium's impact that he has 
established an extensive merchandising op- 
eration centered around his cartoon charac- 
ters — a move, he acknowledges, he did not 
dare take during the many years that his 
Terrytoons were popular, staple fare in mo- 
tion picture theatres. 

To point up his reticence toward televi- 
sion, it must be noted that the tv films re- 
leased for tv a few years ago did not carry 
the Terry imprimateur, but 
were listed as Barker Bill car- 
toons. He confesses he effect- 
uated this disassociation not 
only because he was uncer- 
tain of the films' reception on 
tv, but also because he was 
unsure of the attitude of his 
theatrical film distributors, 
with whom he had enjoyed a 
happy relationship for many 
years. 

The results of his tv plunge, 
according to Mr. Terry, have 
been "amazing." In theatres, 
his cartoon films have con- 
tinued at a high level of in- 
terest — partly because of the 
tv showings, he believes. And 
the interest generated by tele- 
vision has prompted Mr. 



Terry to venture into the merchandising 
enterprise. 

Mr. Terry points out that exposure of his 
cartoon films on 79 stations of CBS-TV on 
Wednesday and Friday (5-5:15 p.m. EST) 
has created demand for products associated 
with his characters. He confesses he was 
astonished at the intense interest, adding: 

"Remember, I've been turning out film 
cartoons for 40 years. Some years ago I 
started a small merchandising operation for 
my characters, but it petered out. Television 
gives the kind of impact in a home setting 
that is so important in a merchandising 
operation." 

About a year ago Mr. Terry hired Selwyn 
Rausch as merchandising manager for Ter- 
rytoons. After eight months of preliminary 




PAUL TERRY (r), head of Terrytoons, and Merchandising Manager Selwyn 
Rausch inspect a Mighty Mouse child's masquerade costume manufactured 
by Bland-Charnas Inc., Stamford, Conn. 



work, the merchandising activity was set in 
motion about four months ago. Mr. Terry 
noted that it is still too early to gauge the 
extent of business but reported it promises 
to develop into "quite a good little business 
venture." 

The company has licensed about 18 firms 
to manufacture Terrytoon character prod- 
ucts. There are about 30 products associated 
with characters including Mighty Mouse, 
Heckle and Jeckle, Terrybears, Dinky 
Ducks, Barker Bill and The Gelt. Products 
include books, charm bracelets, masquerade 
costumes, games, masks, hand puppets, 
phonographic records and dresses, among 
others. 

Mr. Terry said retail outlets seem "mighty 
pleased" with the character merchandise. 

They are sold in variety chain 
stores, drug chain stores, de- 
partment stores, toy shops, 
cigar stores, supermarkets 
and confectionery shops, 
among others. 

Mr. Terry does not effect 
a tie-up with his merchandis- 
ing operation on his televi- 
sion program, which is spon- 
sored by General Mills 
through William Esty Co. 
After all, he pointed out, the 
sponsor pays to promote its 
own products. But Terrytoon 
characters, he said, often are 
exposed on other television 
programs. 

One viewing characteristic 
of his television program 
pleases Mr. Terry: about 
25% of the audience is com- 
posed of adults. He likes 



Page 68 



April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



PROUD LY CHEAT 





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16 ram or 35 mm. Available to give Mitchell Cameras almost limitless capabil- 
ities, ore the finest of professional accessories. 



f^HCneif/ ljummU/ corporatioh 

66<S Wp;t Harvard Street • Glendale 4. Calif. • Cahlo ArlaY 



666 West Harvard Street • Glendale 4, Calif. • Cable Address: MITCAMCO 
85% of the professional motion pictures shown throughout the world are filmed with a Mitchel 



this 75-25 ratio because the adults, in the 
final analysis, foot the bill for his advertiser 
and for his merchandised products. He also 
has observed another pleasureable phenome- 
non: the merchandising activity creates in- 
terest in the tv show. 

He expressed the belief that he will be in 
television for a long time. He uses two six- 
minute films on each show and has a back- 
log of 600 films. The firm produces about 
26 films a year for initial theatrical release 
and the product is of the type that lends 



itself admirably to repeat performances. 

Mr. Terry has conjured up another activi- 
ty that ties in well with his merchandising 
operation in supermarkets. It is a "Terry- 
scope," which he describes as a jukebox with 
stereoscopic film. He plans to put this con- 
traption into supermarkets and other estab- 
lishments throughout the country so that 
youngsters can occupy themselves (for a 
slight fee) while their parents are shopping 
(and perhaps buying a Mighty Mouse 
game) . 



The distance that Mr. Terry has traveled 
from the days when he was the "watch-and- 
wait" tv impresario, hidden under Barker 
Bill's coattails, can be estimated by this ob- 
servation: 

"For the past few months, I no longer 
have been anonymous on tv. Today I am 
proud to have the name of Paul Terry as- 
sociated with television, just as it has been 
so long with motion pictures and news- 
papers." 



THE 10 TOP FILMS IN 10 MAJOR MARKETS 



WHAT film programs are most popular with 
American televiewers? To provide a con- 
tinuing answer to that question, B»T, in 
cooperation with the American Research 
Bureau, is inaugurating a new series of 
monthly analyses designed to reveal the 
country's favorite tv film fare. Each month 
B«T will publish the ARB ratings of the top 
10 film programs in 10 U. S. cities carefully 
chosen by a double-sifting process to insure 
their combined representativeness of the 
nation's major markets as to geographic dis- 
tribution and to number of tv stations. 

The 10 markets in the ARB-B»T sample 
include two markets with seven tv stations, 
two with five, three with four, one with 
three and two cities with two stations each. 

The popularity of any filmed program in 
any market depends on a number of outside 
factors — the time of presentation, the other 
programs available to the viewer at the same 
time, etc. — as well as on the inherent enter- 
tainment value of the film itself. Therefore, 
the ARB ratings for the programs in any 
market represent audience behavior in that 
market only and are not projectible nation- 
ally. However, taken in combination, the 
programs in this sample present a reliable 
index to major market tv audience viewing 
habits. The first report, for February, follows: 



MINNEAPOLIS- 
ST. PAUL 



SEATTLE- 
TACOMA 



1. 


Wild Bill Hickok (Flamingo) 


30.0 


1. 


Life of Riley (NBC Film) 


36.9 


2. 


Badge 714 (NBC Film) 


28.6 


2. 


Death Valley Days (McC-E) 


30.7 


3. 


I Led Three Lives (Ziv) 


24.6 


3. 


Liberace (Guild) 


28.5 


4. 


Cisco Kid (Ziv) 


24.5 


4. 


Little Rascals (Interstate) 


28.4 


5. 


Life of Riley (NBC Film) 


23.2 


5. 


Gene Autry (CBS Film) 


27.9 


6. 


Hopalong Cassidy (NBC Film) 


21.1 


6. 


Wild Bill Hickok (Flamingo) 


27.4 


7. 


Annie Oakley (CBS Film) 


18.9 


7. 


Waterfront (MCA-TV) 


26.0 


8. 


Racket Squad (ABC Film) 


17.4 


8. 


Superman (Flamingo) 


25.7 


9. 


Mr. District Attorney (Ziv) 


17.1 


9. 


Annie Oakley (CBS Film) 


25.3 


10. 


Victory at Sea (NBC Film) 


17.0 


10. 


Life with Elizabeth (Guild) 


25.2 


CHICAGO 




CLEVELAND 




l. 


Annie Oakley (CBS Film) 


25.6 


,1, 


Annie Oakley (CBS Film) 


38.0 


2. 


Cisco Kid (Ziv) 


25.3 


2. 


I Led Three Lives (Ziv) 


27.8 


3. 


Wild Bill Hickok (Flamingo) 


23.7 


3. 


Badge 714 (NBC Film) 


25.5 


4. 


Mayor of the Town (MCA-TV) 


23.7 


4. 


Liberace (Guild) 


24.8 


5. 


Superman (Flamingo) 


22.4 


5. 


All Star Theatre (Screen Gems) 


24.6 


6. 


Gene Autry (CBS Film) 


21.2 


6. 


Range Rider (CBS Film) 


23.1 


7. 


Janet Dean, R.N. (UM&M Inc.) 


20.4 


7. 


Mr. District Attorney (Ziv) 


21.9 


8. 


Favorite Story (Ziv) 


18.8 


8. 


Foreign Intrigue (Reynolds) 


20.9 


9. 


Hans Christian Andersen (Interstate) 18.6 


9. 


Waterfront (MCA-TV) 


20.6 


10. 


Racket Squad (ABC Film) 


18.0 


10. 


Janet Dean, R.N. (UM&M Inc.) 


19.6 



NEW YORK 



DAYTON 



WASHINGTON 



1. 


Superman (Flamingo) 


16.4 


2. 


Annie Oakley (CBS Film) 


15.5 


3. 


Abbott and Costello (MCA-TV) 


14.6 


4. 


Guy Lombardo (MCA-TV) 


13.8 


5. 


Range Rider (CBS Film) 


12.4 


6. 


Wild Bill Hickok (Flamingo) 


12.1 


7.. 


Janet Dean, R.N. (UM&M Inc.) 


10.8 


8. 


Amos 'n' Andy (CBS Film) 


10.8 


9. 


Little Rascals (Interstate) 


10.6 


10. 


Meet Corliss Archer (Ziv) 


10.6 



1. 


Kit Carson (MCA-TV) 


33.9 


1. 


Superman (Flamingo) 


2. 


Badge 714 (NBC Film) 


32.2 


2. 


Wild Bill Hickok (Flamingo) 


3. 


Wild Bill Hickok (Flamingo) 


27.4 


3. 


Badge 714 (NBC Film) 


4. 


Range Rider (CBS Film) 


26.4 


4. 


Ramar of the Jungle (TPA) 


5. 


Waterfront (MCA-TV) 


26.0 


5. 


I Led Three Lives (Ziv) 


6. 


Racket Squad (ABC Film) 


22.8 


6. 


Sherlock Holmes (UM&M) 


7. 


Liberace (Guild) 


21.4 


7. 


Amos 'n' Andy (CBS Film) 


8. 


Superman (Flamingo) 


20.8 


8. 


Annie Oakley (CBS Film) 


9. 


Gene Autry (CBS Film) 


19.3 


9. 


Cowboy G-Men (Flamingo-Tele 


10. 


Ramar of the Jungle (TPA) 


18.6 




mount) 




Mr. District Attorney (Ziv) 


18.6 


10. 


My Hero (Official) 



28.3 
25.5 
24.3 
18.7 
18.4 
18.2 
18.0 
15.6 

13.6 
11.4 



LOS ANGELES 



1. 


Badge 714 (NBC Film) 


29.6 


2. 


Waterfront (MCA-TV) 


27.7 


3. 


Life of Riley (NBC Film) 


18.8 


4. 


Annie Oakley (CBS Film) 


18.5 


5. 


Little Rascals (Interstate) 


16.6 


6. 


Superman (Flamingo) 


16.3 


7. 


Mr. District Attorney (Ziv) 


16.3 


8. 


Amos 'n' Andy (CBS Film) 


15.7 


9. 


Stories of the Century (Hollywood Tv) 14.9 


10. 


I Led Three Lives (Ziv) 


14.6 



BOSTON 



1. 


Range Rider (CBS Film) 


39.1 


2. 


I Led Three Lives (Ziv) 


34.0 


3. 


Ellery Queen (TPA) 


27.4 


4. 


Wild Bill Hickok (Flamingo) 


27.4 


5. 


Badge 714 (NBC Film) 


27.3 


6. 


Gene Autry (CBS Film) 


24.6 


7. 


Liberace (Guild) 


20.5 


8. 


Superman (Flamingo) 


20.0 


9. 


Stories of the Century 






(Hollywood Tv) 


19.4 


10. 


Eddie Cantor (Ziv) 


18.6 



ATLANTA 



1. 


Superman (Flamingo) 


37.5 


2. 


Ramar of the Jungle (TPA) 


30.5 


3. 


Wild Bill Hickok (Flamingo) 


28.1 


4. 


Kit Carson (MCA-TV) 


27.1 


5. 


Favorite Story (Ziv) 


25.5 


6. 


Racket Squad (ABC Film) 


22.4 


7. 


Stories of the Century 






(Hollywood Tv) 


21.5 


8. 


Mr. District Attorney (Ziv) 


18.6 


9. 


Abbott and Costello (MCA-TV) 


17.8 


10. 


Badge 714 (NBC Film) 


17.5 



Page 70 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



DISCOVER A NEW HIGH IN AIR TRAVEL 




TWA's 



SUPER 




great new 
CON STELLA TIONS 



LARGEST MOST LUXURIOUS AIRLINERS IN THE SKIES TODAY 7 




MEET FELLOW PASSENGERS in the fashionable 
"Starlight Lounge." Relax in deep-cushioned 
sofas, enjoy your favorite drink from TWA's 
complete beverage service at no extra cost. 



Created by Lockheed 
especially for TWA! 

Powered by Curtiss-Wright's 
newest Turbo-compound engines! 

Interiors by Henry Drey fuss, 
world-famous designer! 

Here's a combination of unsurpassed luxury 
and outstanding speed never before dreamed 
possible— TWA's new Super-G Constellation ! 

There's a richly decorated lounge for 
pleasant conversation ; four spacious cabins ; 
extra-large lean-back chairs, and many other 
luxurious features. At mealtime you'll be 
delighted by each course of a delicious de 
luxe dinner. And any time at all you can 
enjoy your favorite drink— champagne, 
scotch, bourbon, or cocktails, all compli- 
mentary, of course. 

Now operating non-stop between New 
York and Los Angeles, Super-G service will 
soon be extended to key cities coast to coast. 
Be among the first to try the incomparable 
new TWA Super-G Constellations. 

For reservations, see your TWA travel 
agent, or call TWA, Trans World Airlines. 



Fly the finest.. 



FLY 




TRANS WORLD AIRLINES 

V.S.M.- tunor-t-araic/t-MMiM 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 71 



fil 



m maker 



WILLIAM MIESEGAES 



THE PATH that William Miesegaes trav- 
eled to his present post of president of 
Transfilm Inc., New York, producer of tv 
film commercials and non-theatrical films, 
has taken him to the Dutch East Indies, 
Mexico and the U. S. from his native Lon- 
don, and has led him through a checkered 
career as executive of a rubber company, 
manufacturer of textile equipment and de- 
signer and representative for Rolls Royce. 
Today, at 48, from his vantage point as 




president of a firm that employs more than 
100 persons and is considered among the 
largest in its two specialties — tv commercial 
and non-theatrical films — Mr. Miesegaes as- 




Perfect balance ... 0/ skilled operating technicians, specially designed equipment, and 
constant laboratory research maintains Precision leadership in the field of film processing. 

Electronic Printing, for example, illustrates the results of Precision's continuing search for 
improved ways to serve leading producers, directors, and cameramen. Th is important Maurer 
development in the printing of optical sound from magnetic original is installed at Precision 
for kinescope and other recording direct to the optical track. 

In everything there is one best . . . in film processing, it's Precision. 




A division of J. A. Maurer, Inc. 



sesses his variegated career in these terms: 
"Living and traveling in different coun- 
tries and working at different jobs are a 
tremendous asset to a film producer. In 
non-theatrical films especially, which are of 
such great divergence, there is no question 
that a producer's experience can help in- 
fluence production beneficially." 

A tall and distinguished-looking man with 
an athlete's build, Mr. Miesegaes was born 
in London in 1906 (of Dutch parentage). 
He was educated at Harrow in England and 
the Institut Le Rosey in Switzerland. At 
20, moved by a spirit of adventure, he ac- 
cepted a position with the British firm of 
Maclaine, Watson & Co., rubber, sugar and 
tin exporters, in Indonesia (the Dutch East 
Indies) . 

He remained in Indonesia for five years 
and it was during his stay there that he 
acquired a hobby — motion picture photog- 
raphy — that was to change the path of his 
career years later. 

In 1941, armed with several motion pic- 
ture cameras, Mr. Miesegaes journeyed to 
Mexico on a vacation trip. His film footage 
of that country was rated "exceptional" by 
professional photographers, and, after edit- 
ing, was placed on the bill at Rockefeller 
Center's Guild Theatre in New York. 

Mr. Miesegaes credits Walter Lowendahl, 
currently Transfilm's executive vice presi- 
dent and formerly a long-time producer- 
director at many of Hollywood's major 
studios, with supplying much of the know- 
how required in the company's formative 
years. The firm began humbly in 1941 with 
three employes, specializing in civil defense 
films. Gradually the company spread its 
wings, acquiring commercial film accounts 
and finally in 1947 producing some of the 
earlier tv film commercials. 

Transfilm has grown steadily through the 
years and is still in a period of expansion, 
according to Mr. Miesegaes. He estimates 
that gross billings in 1954 were about 51% 
over those of 1953. Among the "blue 
chip" accounts which Transfilm has serviced 
are the General Foods Corp., Studebaker- 
Packard Corp., General Electric Co., Con- 
tinental Can Co., Corning Glassworks, 
AT&T, Western Union, Shell Oil Co., Gen- 
eral Baking Corp., Time Inc. and Procter 
& Gamble, etc. Transfilm has a co-produc- 
tion agreement with Dollywood of Amster- 
dam for films employing a puppet technique, 
which have been shown on television in the 
U. S. (Goebel's beer). Another soon-to-be- 
seen on tv in this process is "The Story of 
Light" produced for General Electric. 

Mr. Miesegaes strikes a wholesome bal- 
ance in outside activities between the ath- 
letic and the aesthetic. He is fond of yacht- 
ing, mountain climbing and swimming, but 
also collects paintings and objects of art. 
He is a member of the Film Producers Assn. 
of New York, the Royal Netherlands Yacht 
Club and the Town Tennis Club. 

He lives with his wife, the former Mary 
Blackwood of Alexandria, La., in a mid- 
Manhattan apartment, which reflects Mr. 
Miesegaes' talent as a designer and art col- 
lector. It was considered such a "show- 
place" that an outstanding "shelter" publi- 
cation recently ran a photographic layout 
of the Miesegaes' apartment. 



Page 72 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting; 



NOW! the new 



Eliminates extra 

manpower 

requirements 





opaque and transparency projector 



REMOTE OR LOCAL CONTROL 
CHECK THESE NEW FEATURES 

• Completely automatic . . . utilizing features 
contained in the now famous Telop and Telo- 
jector . . . Slides change by push button control. 

• Sequence of up to 50 slides can be handled 
at one loading . . . additional pre-loaded 
slide holders easily inserted in unit. 

• Remote control of lap dissolves . . . super- 
position of two slides . . . and slide changes. 

• Shutter type dimming permits fades without 
variation of color temperature . . . opaque 
copy cooled by heat filters and adequate 
blowers . . . assembly movable on base which 
permits easy focus of image. 

SCREEN OUT HIGH PRODUCTION 
COSTS FOR LOCAL SPONSORS 

Telop JH by the elimination of extra manpower assures the production 
and projection of low-cost commercials that local sponsors can afford. 
It can be used with any TV camera including the new Vidicon camera. 
Telop IE projects on single optical axis opaque cards, photographs, art 
work, transparent 3'A" x A" glass slides, strip material, and 2" x 2" 
transparencies when Telojector is used with optical channel provided. 
Telop IK eliminates costly film strips and expensive live talent. 

WRITE FOR: Illustrated bulletin describing Telop H specifications. Your 
request will receive prompt response. 




Telop HE. . . interior view of auto- 
matic slide holder which accommo- 
dates 4" x 5" opaque slides . . .One 
lens ... no registration problem . . . 
no keystoning. 



RESEARC 



AND DEVELOPMENT CO., Inc., Hilliard St., Manchester, Conn. 
Division of the GRAY MANUFACTURING COMPANY 
Originators of the Gray Telephone Pay Station and the 
Gray Audograph and PhonAudograph . 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 73 



TWORK TV SHOWS 





ABC 


SUNDAY 

CBS DuMONT 


6:00 PM 




Lehn & Finl 
The Lucy 




6:15 




Show 
(st. 4/17/55) 




6:30 




Electric 
Companies 
Alt. Wks. 




6:45 




Prudential 
You Are 
There 




7:00 


Skippy 
Peanut 
Butter 


Campbell 
Soup 
Lassie 




7:15 


You Asked 
For It 
L 




7:30 


Pepsi- 
Cola 
Playhouse 


Am. Tobacco 
Prvt Sectry. 




7:45 


(alt, wks.) 
Jack Benny 




8:00 




Lincoln- 
Mercury 
Dealers 
Toast 
of the 
own 




8:15 


the Ages 




8:30 


President's 

Press 
Conference 




8:45 






9:00 


Amer. Razoi 
Bayuk 
\\ inchell 


Gen. Elect. 
G E 




9:15 


The 
Stork 
Club 
L 


Theatre 
F 




9:30 


Bristol- 
Myers 
oiage t 


Seru tan 
Life Begins 
at 80 


9:45 




1 u.uu 


Dodge 
lireak the 


P. Lorillard 
Appoint- 
ment with 
Adventure 




10:15 


Hank 
L 








Jules 




10:30 




Montenier 
alt. wks. 
Remington 




10:45 




Rand 
What's 
My Line L 




11:00 




JNorwich 
Sunday 
News Spec. 




11:15PM 









NBC 



ABC 



MONDAY 

CBS DuMONT 




NBC 



ABC 



TUESDAY 

CBS DuMONT 



NBC 



ABC 



WEDM 

CBS 



Johns Man 

ville 
alt. Sunday 
Pan Amer. 
[ Meet the 
Press L 



Gen. Foods 
Roy Rogers 
F 



Toni 
Frawley 
Corp. 
(alt.) 
People Are 
Funny 



Kakla, Frar 
and Ollie 



Tide Water 
Oil 

Daly-News 



Reynolds 
Mr. Peepers 
L 



Ralston 
Purina 
Name's 
the Same 
L 



Colgate- 
Palmolive 
Comedy 
Hour 
L 

7:30-9 p.m. 
(1 wk. of 4) 
M. Liebmarj 
Presents 
H. Bishop 
Sunbeam L 



Studebaker 

Packard 
Tv Readers 
Digest 



Firestone 
Voice of 
Firestone 
L 



Goodyear 
Corp. 

(alt. with) 
Philco 
Corp. 
TV 

Playhouse 



Focus 
F 



P&G 
Loretta 
Young 

Show 
F 

— FTT — 

Reynolds 

Bob 
Cummings 
Show 
F 



Boxing 
From 
Eastern 
Parkway 

and 
Neutral 
Corner 
L 



Amer. Home 
Prod.-News 



Ligg. & Mys 
Perry Como 
L 



Carnation 

(alt.) 
Goodrich 
Burns & 
Allen 
L 



Lever- 
Lipton 
Godfrey's 
Talent 
Scouts 
L 



Philip 
Morris 
alt. wks. 
P&G 
I Love Lucy 
F 



General 
Foods 
December 
Bride 
L 



Westing- 
house 
Studio 
One 
L 



Longines 
Chronoscope 



Co-op 
Monday 
Night 
Fights 
Chris. 
Schenkel 



Co-op 
At 
Ringside 



Kakla, Fran 
and Ollie 



Toni Co. 
Tony Mar- 
tin Show 
L 



John Daly 
News 



Plymouth 

(3) 
Camel (1) 
Caravan L 
Ford Motor 
Co., RCA 
Producers' 
Showcase 

(8-9:30 
1 wk. of 4) 



DuPont 
Cavalcade 
of 

America 



No Net. 
Service 



RCA 
Amer. Chicle 
Speidel 
Caesar's 
Hour 



Florida 
Citrus 
Twenty 
Questions 
L 



Dow 
Chemical 
Medic 
F 



American 
Tobacco 
alt. Dodge 
Danny 
Thomas 
Show 



Johnson 

Wax 
alt. with 
American 
Tobacco Co. 

Robert 
Montgomery 
Presents 



U.S. Steel 
United 
States 
Steel Hour 
alt. weeks 

Elgin 
The 
Elgin Hour 



Exquisite 
Form- 
Quality 
Goods 
(alt. wks.) 
Stop the 
Music 



American 
Tobacco 
News L 



Gold Seal 
Jo Stafford 
L 



CBS- 
Columbia 
(alt. wks.) 
Gen. Mills 
Life with 
Father 



Int. Hrvstr. 
alt. wks. 
Nabisco 
Halls of 
Ivy 
F 



Carter Prod. 

alt. wks. 
Pharmctcls. 
Meet Millie 
L 



S.C. Johnson 
alt. wks. 
Pet Milk 
Red Skelton 
L 



Nash- 
Kelvinator 
alt. wks. 
Revlon 
Danger 



Alcoa 
See It Now 



Dinah Shore 
Chevrolet 
L 



Admiral 
Corp. 
Life Is 
Worth 
Living 



H. J. 

Heinz 
Co. 
Studio 57 



Kakla, Fran 
and Ollie 



Tide Water 
Oil 

Daly-News 



Camel 
News 
Caravan L 



Buick 
Berle Show 
(20 shows) 



American 
Motors 
American 
Dairy 
Derby Foods 
Disneyland 



M. Raye 
H. Bishop 
(10 shows) 
Bob Hope 
6) Gen. Fds. 

TBA— 3 



Liggett- 
Myers 
The New 
Stu Erwin 

Show 
(eff. 4/20) 
Mr. Citizen 



P&G 
Fireside 
Theatre 
F 



Remington 

Rand- 
Knomark 

Mfg. 
(Alt. wks.) 
Masquerade 
Party 



Vrmstrong's 
Circle 
Theatre 
L 



5heaffer Pen 
Zo., Admiral 

Corp. 
(alt. wks.) 
Who Said 
That? 



Truth or 
Consequence 
P. Lorillard 
L 



President's 



Conference 
F 



It's a 
Great Life 
Chrysler 
Corp. 



Bendix Di 
Avco Mfi 
News " 



Ligg. & M;l 
Perry^Coijli 



Toni 

4/20. 271, 
CBS " 
Columbi: 
4/13 

Godfrey 
& His 
Friends, 

Frigidairl 
(alt. wksi 
Pillsburj 



I 

Colgate! 
The 
MillionaiJ 



R. J. 
Reynold! 
I've Got! 
A Secret 
L 



Pabst Sail 
Blue Ribb, 
Bouts 

Westinghi 
Best of I 
Broadwaj 
very 4th v 
10-11 P.W 



iFM Ins.C i 
Fled Barbel 
Corner 



Longines 
Chronosco 




SUNDAY 

CBS DuMONT 



9:00 AM 






9:15 






9:30 






9:45 






10:00 




Lamp 
Unto 
My 
Feet 


10:15 




10:30 






10:45 




Look Up 
and Live 


11:00 






11:15 






11:30 






11:45 






12:00 N 




Winky 
Dink 


12:15 PM 




and You 


12:30 


Voice of 
Prophecy 
Faith for 
Today 


Quaker Oats 
Contest 


12:45 


Carnival L 


1:00 






1:15 







DuMONT 



fDAl 

DuMONT 



3apt. Hartz 
& His Pets 
Hartz Mtn. 
Prods, L 



No 
Network 
Service 



Youth 
Wants to 
Know 
Wash. 
L 



No 
Network 
Service 



The 
Morning 
Show M-F 

7-9 a.m. 
Participat- 
ing 
Sponsors 



Garry 
Moore 

Show 
and 
Arthur 
Godfrey 

Time 

(See 
Footnotes 
For New 

Time 
Schedule) 



Colgate- 
Palmolive 

M-F 
11:30-12 N 
Strike It 
Rich L 



Gen. Mills 
(MWF) 
Toni Co. 
(TuTh) 
Valiant Lady 



Amer. Home 

Products 
Love of Life 

p&"g — 

Search for 
Tomorrow 



P&G Guid- 
ing Light 



Gen. Foods 
The Inner 
Flame 

P&G 

Road of 
Life 



Ding Dong 
School L 

(See 
Footnote) 



Borden Co 

Way of 
the World L 



Sheilah 
Graham 
Show L 



Brown Shoe 
Smilin' Ed's 
Gang 



Participat- 
ing 
Sponsors 
Home 
L 



Tennessee 
Ernie Ford 
L 



Feather 
Your Nest 

Colgate- 
Palmolive 
L 



Winky 
Dink 
and 
You 



Wander Co 
(alt. wks.) 
Gen. Mills 
Captain 
Midnight 
F 



National 

Dairy 
The Big 
Top 
L 



Gen. Mills 
The Lone 
Ranger 
F 



1:30 PM 



1:45 



2:15 



Pinky Lee 
Show 
L 



2:30 



2:45 



Paul 
Winchell 

Show 
Tootsie 

Rolls 
L 



3:( 



3:15 



Funny 
Boners 
L 



3:30 



3:45 



Kraft Foods 
Tom Corbett 
Space Cadet 
L 



4:00 



4:15 



Mr. 
Wizard 
L 



4:30 



4:45 



College j 
Press 
Conferenc; 



5:15 



5:30 



5:45 PM 



Kellogg C< 
(5-5:30) ! , 
Mars Inc! 
(5:30-6)' 

Dixie 
Cup Co. 
(alt. wks.! 
Super Circi 
L 



)AY 

uMONT 



NBC 



ABC 



THURSDAY 

CBS DuMONT 



NBC 



ABC 



FRIDAY 

CBS DuMONT 



NBC 



r 

V N# ^ 



ABC 



SATURDAY 

CBS DuMONT 



NBC 



Vlont 
abs 
lat's 
Story 



Kukla, Fran 
and Ollie 



John Daly 
News 



Coca-Cola 
Eddie Fisher 
L 



Plymouth 

Nevra 
Caravan L 



General 
Mills 
Lone 

Ranger 
F 



Kodak 
Request 
Performance 
F 



Soldier 
Parade 
L 



Scott 
My Little 
Margie 
F 



Chevrolet 

T-Men 
in Action 



Kraft 
Foodg 
Television 
Theatre 
L 



Rrillo Star 
Tonight 



1 1 azel 
Bishop 
This Is 
Your Life 
(alt. wk.) 
P&G 



Pond's 
Extract 
Pond's 
Theatre 



Big Town 
A. C. Spark 
Div.— G.M. 

(alt. wk.) 
Lever Bros. 
F 



American 
Tobacco 
News 



Gen. Electric 
Jane Froman 



General 
Electric 
Ray Milland 
Show F 



Chrysler 
Motors 
Climax — 
Shower 
of Stars 
L 



Singer Sew'g. 
alt. wks. 

Brstl. Myrs 
Four Star 
Playhouse 



Philip 
Morris 

(alt. wks.) 
Revlon 
Public 
Defender F 



CBS- 
Columbia 
(alt. wks.) 
Gen. Mills 

Willy 



Dinah Shore 
Chevrolet 
L 



Kukla, Fran 
and Ollie 



Tide Water 
Oil 

Daly-News 



Camel 
News 
Caravan L 



National 
Biscuit 
Co. 
Rin 
Tin Tin 
F 



DeSoto- 
Plymouth 
Groucho 
Marx 
F 



Lambert 
Ho (point 

(alt.) 
Ozzie & 
Harriet 
F 



Borden 
Justice 
L 



Lehn & Fink 
Ray Bolger 



Chesterfield 
Dragnet 
F 



Mogen 
David 
Wines 
Dollar a 
Second 



Ford 
Theatre 
F 



Sterling 

Drug 
The Vise 



Lever 
Bros. 
Lux 
Video 
Theatre 
L 



Pharmaceu- 
ticals-News 



Ligg. & Mys. 
Perry Como 
L 



General 
Foods 
Mama 



R. J. 
Reynolds 
alt. wks. 

P&G 
Topper 
F 



Schlitz 
Playhouse 
of Stars 
F 



General 
Foods 
Sanka 
Our .Miss 
Brooks 
F 



Brown & 
Williamson 
(alt. wks.) 
P&G 
The 
Line-Up 



American 
Oil, Ilamm 
Brewing 
(alt. wks.) 
Noxzeraa 
Person to 
Person 



Longines 
3hronoscope 



Red Buttons 
3 of 4 
J. Carson 
1 of 4 
Pontiac 
L 



Emerson 

Drug 
Lentheric 
Chance of 
Lifetime 



Western 
Union 
Teleg. Co. 
(alt. wks.) 

Down 
You Go 



Tomorrow 
L-S 



Coca-Cola 
Eddie Fisher 
L 



Camel 
News 
Caravan L 



The Big 
Picture 
F 



Gulf— Life 
of Riley 
F 



The 
Dotty 
Mack 
Show 



Simoniz & 
Amer. C&C 
Big Story 
F 



Campbell 
Dear 
Phoebe 
F 



Ozark 
Jubilee 
L 



Gillette 
Cavalcade 
of Sports 
L 



Compass 
F 



Jan Murray 
Time 
L 



Wrigley 
Gene 
Autry 
Show 



Sylvania 
Beat 
the 
Clock 
L 



Schick 
P&G 
Nescafe 
Jackie 
Gleason 
(co- 
sponsorship) 
L 



P. Lorillard 
Two for the 
Money 



P&G 
alt. wks. 
Simmons 
My Favorite 
Husband 



TIelene 
Curtis Inc. 
Professional 

Father 



Anheuser- 
Busch 
Damon 
Runyon 
Theatre 
St. 4/16 



Swift & Co. 
Swift's 
Show 
Wagon 
L 



Pillsbury- 
Green Giant 
Mickey 
Rooney 
Show 
F 




6:30 



6:45 



7:15 



7:30 



7:45 



8:15 



Toni Co. 
So This Ts 
I lolly wood 
L 



1:30 



Coca Show 
3'riffin, SOS 
Lewis Howe 

J&J L 
(1 wk. of 4) 
)-10:30 P.M. 

Liebman 
OIHsmobile 



8:45 



9:15 



Texaco Star 

Theatre 
I. Durante L 

(all.) 
O'Connor F 



9:30 



9:45 



Geo. Gobel 
Show 
Armour 

(alt.) 
Pet Milk 
L 



10:00 



10:15 



\m. Tobacco 
Warner 
1 1 iidnnt 
Your Hit 
Parade 
L 



10:30 



10:45 



11: 



11:15 



SUNDAY 

CBS DuMONT 



NBC 



ace 
ilion 



fow 
md 
hen 



eniure 



"he 

'.rican 
'eek 



"he 
arch 



No 
Network 
Service 



Frontiers 
of Faith 
L 



American 
Forum 
L 



TBA 



Quaker Oats 
Zoo Parade 
L 



Hall Bros. 
Hall of Fame 
L 



Heinz 
Capt. Gal- 
lant of the 
Foreign 
Legion 
F 



ABC 



MONDAY - FRIDAY 

CBS DuMONT 



NBC 



Art 
Linkletter's 
House Party 

(See 
Footnote) 
2:30-3 pm 



P&G 
Welcome 
Travelers 



Robert Q. 
Lewis 
(See 
footnote) 



Colgate Big 

Payoff 
MWF Big 
Payoff Sus. 
Tu., Thurs. 



Bob Crosby 
(See foot- 
notes) 



P&G 
The Brighter 
Day 



Am. Home 
Pr. Secret 
Storm 
4:15-30 
M-W-F 
Sus. Tu, Th 



P&G 
On Your 
Account 
4:30-5 



Gen. Mills 
Barker Bill's 

Cartoons 
W&F 5-5:15 



All 

About 
Baby 
(see foot- 
note) 



The Greatest 
Gift 
L 



Ted Mack 
Matinee 
L 



P&G L 

Concerning 
Miss 
Marlowe 



Hawkins 
Falls 
L 



First Love 
Jergens Co. 
L 



^rnch. Mstd 
World of Mr 

Sweeney L 



Modern 
Romances 
Hol.-Pal. L 



Pinky Lee 
Show 
L 



Howdy 
Doody 

(See 
Footnote) 



ABC 



SATURDAY 

CBS DuMONT 



NBC 



Lever 
Bros. 
Uncle 
Johnny 
Coons 



Falstaff- 

Co-op 
Baseball 
Game of 
the Week 



Explanation : Programs In Italics, sustaining; 
Time. EST; L, live; P, film: K, kinescope re- 
cording; E. Eastern network; M, Midwestern. 



CBS — Garry Moore M.— Tim. 10-10:30 a.m., Fri. 
10-11 :30 a.m. 

10- 10:15 Mon. Bristol Mvers, Tue. A Ilea -Seltzer, 
Wed. Simoniz, Tim. Masland. Fri. Swifl All 
Sweet. 

10:15-30 Mon. Comstoclc alt. wks. A. E. Staley. 

Tue. Kellogg. Wed. Best Foods, Tim. Toni alt. 

wks. Chun King. Fri. 
10:30-45 Fri. Yardley. 
10:45-11 Fri. Converted Bice. 

11- 11:15 Fri. Borden. 
11:15-30 Fri.— Swift. 

Arthur Godfrey 

10:30-45 a.m. Hon.— Minnesota Mining Mfg. 

Wed.— Corn Prod. Tu. & Th. Frigidaire. 
10:45-11 a.m. M. & W.— Bristol Myers. Tu. & 

Th.— Kellogg. 
11-11:15 a.m. M. & W.— Lever Bros. Tu. & Th.— 

Toni. 

11:15-30 a.m. M.-Th. — Pillsbury. 

Robert Q. Lewis — 2-2:15 p.m., Tue. Alka-Seltzer, 
Wed. Corn Prod., Thu. S. C. Johnson. 

2:15-30 p.m. Tue. Helene Curtis, Wed. General 
Mills. Tim. Swanson, Fri. General Mills. 

House Party 

2-30-45 M.. W.. Fri. Lever Bros.. Tu. Th. Kellogg. 
2:15-3 p.m. M.-Thu. Pillsbury, Fri. Hawaiian 
Pineapple Co. 

Bob Crosby— 3:30-45 p.m. Tue. Toni, Tim. Swan- 
son. Fri. S.O S. alt. wks. only. 

3:45-4 p.m., M.. W., Fri.— General Mills. 
Thu. — American Dairy. 

DuMont— Libby. McNeill & Libby (Thurs. 2-2:15 
p.m. only). Swift & Co. (Fri. 2-2:15 p.m. only). 

NBC— Howdy Doody Mon. Fri. 5:30-(! p.m.. EST. 

— Campbell Soup Co.. Colgate-Palmolive Co., 

Continental Baking Co.. International Shoe Co.. 

Kellogg Co.. Union's Inc., Standard Brands 

Inc.. Welch Grape Juice Co. 
Ding Dong School— Mon. -Fri. 10-10:30 a.m. EST. 

Colgate Palmolive Co.. General Mills Inc., 

Gerber Products Co.. International Shoe Co.. 

Manhattan Soap Co., Procter & Gamble Co., 

Wander Co. 



4* 

BROADCASTING 
TELECASTING 

April 11, 1955 



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Canadian Pacific offers 
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to all U.S. TV stations 



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Shining Mountains 18 
Banff's Golf Challenge 21 
Jackpine Journey 20 
Snowtime Holiday 19 
High Powder . 22 
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Klondike Holiday 22 
Canada's Tackle Busters 21 
Canada's East Coast Playground 20 
Alaska and the Yukon 1 1 

Riding High 18 
Happy Voyage 17 

For films and complete information contact: P. T. 
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•IN PUBLIC INTEREST- 



Lewis Appeals to Radio-Tv 
For Cancer Drive Support 

APPEAL to radio and television stations has 
been made on behalf of the American Can- 
cer Society by William B. Lewis, president 
of Kenyon & Eckhardt, New York, and chair- 
man of the radio and tv advisory committee of 
ACS. Mr. Lewis called upon the industry to 
give all-out support to Cancer Control Month 
during April. 

To assist stations in supporting the drive, ASC 
has prepared a radio kit with four transcribed 
shows. The material contains celebrity appeals, 
a baseball show, country and popular music 
programs, spot announcements, disc jockey, 
homemaker, sports, farm and commentator in- 
serts and special information for broadcasters 
who wish to prepare their own material. 

In the television kit are spots, posters, flip- 
boards, slides, telops and a 39-inch plywood 
cancer crusade sword. Film material includes 
10 20-second and 10 one-minute spots. Mr. 
Lewis said that "the story of cancer is graphi- 
cally told" in these announcements. 

Telethon Offers Prizes 

WGN-TV Chicago held a 20 Vi -hour telethon 
for the City of Hope, medical research center, 
Duarte, Calif., in which $35,000 in prizes was 
offered contestants contributing $1 and com- 
pleting the sentence "I am helping the City of 
Hope because . . ." First prize was a $15,000 
house donated by a local lumber company. 

35 Donors Line Up 

WWLP (TV) Springfield, Mass., aired an 
American Red Cross appeal for immediate 
donations of a type of blood in short supply 
and rapidly turned up 35 donors. The local Red 
Cross termed it "our most successful appeal 
through the medium of radio or television." 

Heart Diseases Outlined 

WGLV (TV) Easton, Pa., aired a program in 
which heart diseases — their causes and cures — 
were discussed in an attempt to inform the 
public on why it should contribute to the cur- 
rent fund drive. The program was put on in 
cooperation with the National Heart Fund. 

'Firemen's Tragedy Fund' 

WAAM (TV) Baltimore has contributed $1,000 
to the fund being raised there to aid the fam- 
ilies of six firefighters killed during a down- 
town fire. WAAM (TV) and the other Balti- 
more stations have run special programs and 
spot announcements to supplement the "Fire- 
men's Tragedy Fund." 

Little Boy Lost 

WFBC-TV Greenville, S. C, aided parents in 
distress when it presented their stray three-year- 
old on a children's program after he had been 
picked up by the police as he wandered along 
the street. 

Heart Fund Benefits 

OVER $161,000 in pledges was reported by 
officials of the American Heart Assn. after 
the 13V4-hour KNXT (TV) Hollywood "Heart- 
beat" telethon. The program featured a live 
telecast from the Los Angeles County General 
Hospital of parts of a cardiac operation on a 
17-year-old boy. 

Calling Car 22 

WING Dayton, Ohio, is presenting Car 22 in 
an effort to reduce driving accidents. The pro- 
gram is produced and executed by the Dayton 



lunior Chamber of Commerce in cooperation 
with the Dayton Police Dept. A Jaycee goes 
along with the police accident investigation 
cruiser and tape records dialogue at the scene 
of the accident. The same 15-minute program 
is presented three-times weekly during late night 
and early morning hours when teen-age and 
party-going traffic is heavy. 

Kentucky Safety Announcements 

KENTUCKY broadcasting stations are carry- 
ing a minimum of 17,000 announcements this 
month on behalf of traffic safety along with a 
series of safety programs. Taking part in the 
campaign are 56 stations, according to Hugh O. 
Potter, WOMI Owensboro, secretary-treasurer 
of the Kentucky Broadcasters Assn. 

YMCA Building on the Way 

KCOH Houston, Tex., programming primarily 
to the Negro market, collected $10,000 in a 
13-hour radiothon. The money was raised to 
help build a new Negro YMCA building there. 

Red Cross Announcements 

WWDC-AM-FM Washington, in connection 
with the 1955 Red Cross Fund campaign, 
set aside 50% of its March station identifica- 
tion announcements for mention of the drive. 

Emergency Call in Phil ly 

PHILADELPHIA General Hospital reported 
to WPTZ (TV) there that over 100 blood dona- 
tions were made after the station broadcast an 
emergency appeal at the hospital's request. 

Income Tax Broadcasts 

WTAM and WNBK (TV) Cleveland are airing 
special programs to aid viewers and listeners 
in completing their federal income tax forms. 
WTAM has a weekly series in which changes 
in the law and tax forms are explained. WNBK 
is presenting a four-show series in which an 
internal revenue representative demonstrates 
exactly how to fill out each type of form. 

Aired Fire Assistance 

WHEN a fire alarm goes off in Truro, N. S., 
CKCL there goes on the air to call the volun- 




REV. R. T. Williams (c), chaplain of 
KOMA-KWTV (TV) Oklahoma City, Okla., 
who directs all religious and spiritual pro- 
grams on the stations, accepts award from 
B. D. Eddy (r), Oklahoma City 1955 
Brotherhood chairman representing the 
National Conference of Christians & 
Jews. Edgar T. Bell, general manager of 
the stations, witnesses the presentation. 
The NCCJ said, in making the award, 
that it knew of no other station which 
makes the title designation of "chaplain." 



FASTER, SAFER, LESS COSTLY... 
Because It's More Efficient! 



Page 76 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



NEW! IMPROVED 



* 



NEW 



STEERING 
SELECTOR 

Type of steering is easily and 
quickly changed by simply ro- 
tating steering bar — without 
removing hands from the bar. 
Turns on own axis, in any 
desired arc or tracks in a 
straight line. 




'■fl; 


ft 










ft 









STRAIGHT 
TRACKING 



CIRCULAR 
STEERING 



PARALLEL 
STEERING 



\ / 
Kc/ 

^ r 



/ \ 

^ k 

PIVOTING 



The most versatile, most maneuverable of all motion picture or 
TV camera dollies is now better than ever with many important 
improvements. 



NEW BEARINGS. Rolls easily, 
smoothly on new, precision bearings 
in wheel spindles. 

IMPROVED TRACKING. Tracks in a 
steady, straight line for running 
dolly shots. 

NEW FLOOR LOCK. Cinemobile can 
be quickly locked in position for 
fixed location shooting. 

NOW — 2 SEATS. Second seat pro- 
vided for assistant cameraman. 



LEVELING HEAD. Compensates for 
out-of-level floor condition. 

NEW HYDRAULIC SYSTEM. Raises or 
lowers camera boom smoothly, 
quietly, automatically from extremely 
low to 57" high even with dolly in 
motion. New hydraulic fluid avail- 
able everywhere. 

'Shown with new H-F Cradle Head (not included). 
SEND FOR CATALOGS NOW! 



HOUSTON 






HOUSTON FEARLESS DIVISION 
11801 W. Olympic Blvd. • Los Angeles 64, Calif. 
Send information on ( ) Cinemobile ( ) Panoram Dolly 
( ) Camera Crane ( ) TV Pedestal ( ) All Metal Tripod 
( ) Film Processors ( ) Camera Heads ( ) Parabolas 

Name 

Firm 

Address 

City Zone State . 



"WORLD'S LARGEST MANUFACTURER OF MOTION PICTURE FILM PROCESSING 




Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 77 



IN PUBLIC INTEREST 



From where I sit 
6y Joe Marsh 



Uses His Head, Saves His Feet 

Nobody around here can remember 
when Pop Turner wasn't our town's 
postman. He must have been toting 
that big, heavy mailsack since Pony 
Express days. 

That's why its sometimes a shock 
to see him these days pulling his mail- 
bag around in what they call a "caddy 
cart' 1 — a sort of light wagon that golf- 
ers use so they don't have to carry 
their clubs. 

"Folks sometimes holler 'fore' at 
me and ask me how my game is," Pop 
reports, "but I'm not ashamed to learn 
something new. Just wish I'd thought 
about these golf gadgets years ago!" 

From where I sit, its good to see 
someone come up with a new wrinkle 
— keeps us from feel ing too regimented. 
For instance, perhaps you've always 
felt that hot milk is the only thing to 
drink at bedtime. Then someday you 
meet a fellow who prefers a cold glass 
of beer. Well, that's his choice — and 
certainly he's entitled to it. We can't 
expect everyone to follow our old 
habits to the "letter." 



Copyright, 1955, United States Brewers Foundation 




$2 Million From Telethons 

APPROXIMATELY $2 million in cash 
and pledges has been raised for United 
Cerebral Palsy through 14 telethons in 
cities throughout the country, UCP has 
announced. Stations which figured in the 
campaigns were: WABI-TV Bangor, Me.; 
WABC-TV New York; WTVW (TV) 
Milwaukee; WFIL-TV Philadelphia; 
WTCN (TV) Minneapolis; WMUR-TV 
Manchester; WAAM (TV) Baltimore; 
WTVI (TV) Belleville, 111. (St. Louis); 
WTPA (TV) Harrisburg; WTVJ (TV) 
Miami; WIBW (TV) Topeka; KXLY-TV 
Spokane; KVAR (TV) Phoenix; KGEO- 
TV Enid, Okla. 



teer firemen in the rural community, to an- 
nounce the location and nature of the fire 
and to warn listeners to stay away from the 
fire so as not to hamper the work of the fire 
department. The program is sponsored by a 
local fire insurance firm. 

Fast Action in Timmins 
ONE DAY at 11 a.m. CKGB Timmins, Ont., 
aired a request from a local hospital trying to 
get a supply of a critically-needed type of blood. 
At 11:03 a.m. the hospital told the station that 
three donors with the proper type of blood had 
volunteered. 

Regular Programming Scrapped 

WTAC Flint, Mich., devoted two-and-a-half 
hours of its prime evening time for a panel 
discussion of demands and issues in local union 
bargaining with auto manufacturers. Ques- 
tions were phoned in while the program was 
on the air. The session would have lasted 
longer, the station reported, if the seven panel 
members had not pleaded exhaustion at the 
end of the time period; no time limit was set 
by the station. This is the second program the 
station has presented on a major local issue. 
The special broadcast was promoted by hand- 
bills, press notices and announcements. 

'This Is Your City' 

A PUBLIC SERVICE series, This Is Your City, 
has been inaugurated by WABI-TV Bangor, 
Me. The program will report on the various 
operations of the city's departments and mat- 
ters of general interest. In the series opener, 
Bangor's city manager and three members of 
the city council explained council procedures 
and discussed current local legislative problems. 

84-Hour Drive 

THE SECOND ANNUAL radio marathon 
staged by KUAM Agana, Guam, on the air for 
84 consecutive hours, raised over $15,000 in 
cash and pledges for the island charity organi- 
zation, the Helping Hands of Guam, station 
executives have announced. Last year's 73- 
hour KUAM broadcast produced $12,000 for 
the Helping Hands. 

Stations Donate Profits 

WIST Charlotte, N. C, originated the second 
annual Carolinas' Kiwanis high school basket- 
ball classic for a network of North and South 
Carolina stations which donated their profits 
from broadcast of the game to the Carolinas' 
Spastics Hospital. Stations receiving the pro- 
gram were: WBIG Greensboro, WDNC Dur- 
ham, WPTF Raleigh, WCEC Rocky Mount, 
WHPE High Point, WBBB Burlington, WGNC 
Gastonia, WMSC Columbia, WFIG Sumter, 
WMRB Greenville, and WBCU Union. 



Page 78 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 




GOVERN 



WITNESSES CALL FOR STUDY 
OF TV-DELINQUENCY PROBLEM 

Majority of those appearing last week before the Senate Juvenile 
Delinquency Subcommittee cite the need of scientific research for 
perhaps several years to determine if tv is a factor in delinquency. 



THE NEED for thorough and scientific re- 
search for perhaps several years — to determine 
if television programming is actually a factor 
in juvenile delinquency — was emphasized by a 
majority of witnesses appearing before the 
Senate Juvenile Delinquency Subcommittee last 
week. 

The juvenile delinquency unit, headed by Sen. 
Estes Kefauver (D-Tenn.), held final hearings 
Wednesday and Thursday On tv programming. 
Testifying were spokesmen for NARTB, NBC, 
FCC, an educational tv station, educators and 
researchers on child behavior. 

Three NARTB spokesmen — Harold E. Fel- 
lows, president; Thad Brown, tv vice president, 
and Edward Bronson, Tv Code affairs director 
— outlined a progress report on what NARTB 
and its Tv Code Review Board have been doing 
to improve programs since the trio testified 
before the group last fall [B*T, Oct. 25, 1954]. 

Joseph V. Heffernan, NBC financial vice 
president, cited NBC's long-term program of 
presenting beneficial tv fare and the network's 
own code of programming standards, offered to 
aid any research group looking into possible 
connections between tv shows and childhood 
delinquency and announced appointment of a 
special children's program review committee and 
a supervisor of children's programs for the net- 
work see story, page 54). 

FCC Comr. Frieda B. Hennock tore into 
present tv offerings and among other things 
proposed that the FCC hold hearings on pro- 
posed rule-making to establish standards for tv 
program content, afterward refusing to renew 
the licenses of those stations which do not 
present tv offerings "in the public interest." 
Launching into another touchy subject, brought 
up by Sen. Alexander Wiley (R-Wis.), she pro- 
posed that political candidates be given free 
time "on the people's airwaves" (see story, page 
90, and editorial, page 126). 

Other witnesses were: William A. Wood, 
general manager, educational WQED (TV) 
Pittsburgh (ch. 13); Dr. Paul Lazarsfeld, Co- 
lumbia U. sociology department, originator of 
several mass media research methods; Dr. 
Eleanor E. Maccoby, Harvard U. social rela- 



tions department, who reported on a survey 
four years ago in tv homes and non-tv homes 
in Cambridge, Mass.; Dr. Ralph Steven Banay, 
research psychiatrist, Columbia U.; Mrs. Louise 
S. Walker, audio-visual education supervisor, 
Montgomery County (Md.) Schools. 

The subcommittee, which held hearings June 
5 and Oct. 19-20, 1954, is scheduled to make 
a special report on television programs. James 
H. Bobo, chief counsel, said Thursday he hopes 
the report will be ready by May 1. 

Subcommittee members are Chairman Ke- 
fauver, who presided at Wednesday's hearing; 
Sen. Thomas C. Hennings (D-Mo.), who acted 
as chairman Thursday; Sen. Wiley, who at- 
tended both days' hearings; Sen. William 
Langer (R-N. D.), present at the Thursday 
session, and Sen. Olin D. Johnston (D-S. C). 
The Senate unit is operating with an appropria- 
tion of $125,000 and under a current Senate 
resolution must complete its work by July 31. 

(Statements made by witnesses last week 
have been condensed by B«T while still giving 
a fair presentation of each witness' opinions. 
Following each statement is testimony de- 
veloped by questioning from members of the 
Senate subcommittee.) 

Harold E. Fellows 
NARTB President 

Television broadcasting stations are fully 
cognizant of the fact that good programs at- 
tract large audiences. They also know that 
bad programming in this free market place 
of ideas will rapidly toll the demise of any 
television station. Therefore, it is incumbent 
upon a station to learn the desires of its listen- 
ers, both present and potential, because it is the 
public preference which, in the final analysis, 
controls this industry — rather than any net- 
work, station, agency, or advertiser. 

We are aware of the allegations that have 
been made against certain mystery and ad- 
venture programming. Only a few of these 
allegations have been to the effect that televi- 
sion is a major cause of juvenile delinquency, 
but there have been numerous comments to the 
effect that television may be a contributing 



ATTENTIVE to testimony at last week's 
hearing by Senate Juvenile Delinquency 
Subcommittee on tv programming are (I 
to r) Sen. Alexander Wiley (R-Wis.), 
Chairman Estes Kefauver (D-Tenn.) and 
James H. Bobo, subcommittee counsel. 

factor. 

For example, we learned several months ago 
that the Youth Bureau of the Detroit Police 
Department was probing into the possible causes 
of juvenile delinquency. We sent a member of 
our staff there to interview the officials. 

In Detroit, television was found not to be 
a cause or stimulus of juvenile delinquency, but 
was found instead to be a useful measure in 
controlling it. 

Last October, Television Magazine decided 
to check with some of the most respected psy- 
chiatrists of the American Psychiatric Assn. to 
see if they felt that television was actually 
warping young minds. They found complete 
agreement that "there is no scientific body of 
facts in existence that could in any way prove 
that television is one of the causes of juvenile 
delinquency." 

Parents Magazine, a highly respected publica- 
tion, recently carried an article entitled "Tele- 
vision and Our Children . . . The Experts 
Speak Up." The article summarized the replies 
to a questionnaire sent to child behavior special- 
ists in various parts of the country. 

In response to the question of whether tele- 
vision programs are responsible for juvenile 
delinquency, the great majority gave a flat no. 
The few who answered more or less affirm- 




MR. WOOD 
Broadcasting • Telecasting 



DR. LAZARSFELD 



COMR. HENNOCK 



MR. HEFFERNAN 

April 11, 1955 • Page 79 



GOVERNMENT 




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Page 80 • April 11, 1955 



atively qualified their replies as "mere sus- 
picions," with "no definite proof." 

The members of the television industry rec- 
ognize that they, as do all of us, have an 
affirmative obligation to contribute to the 
public welfare of this country and its citizens. 
At our previous appearance before the Subcom- 
mittee we outlined various steps which NARTB 
contemplated taking in order to help serve the 
public interest in television programming. 
Among these were a broadening of the monitor- 
ing of television stations by the Television Code 
Affairs staff, plans to employ a professional 
research organization to expand the amount of 
actual monitoring of television programming 
in various areas, plans for a pilot study to de- 
termine public attitudes toward television pro- 
gramming and plans to enlarge the staff of the 
Television Code affairs department. All of these 
plans have been activated, and, at the same 




TESTIFYING jointly for NARTB are (I to r) 
Tv Vice President Brown, President Fellows 
and Tv Code Director Bronson. 

time, we have continued our activity in provid- 
ing stations with all information coming to 
our attention in regard to suggestions for ad- 
vancing the fight against juvenile delinquency 
in their respective communities. We have found 
the television broadcasters anxious to do their 
part in cooperating with any soundly organized 
campaign to reduce delinquency. 

Mr. Fellows, referring to testimony by Comr. 
Hennock that the Tv Code was "good" but un- 
enforceable, said Comr. Hennock's views on the 
Code and the operation of the FCC "are not 
shared by other commissioners." He said past 
and present FCC members have commended 
NARTB and the Code. 

Sen. Kefauver, referring to results of a 
survey presented by NARTB in which a number 
of prominent educators and public officials 
could find no connection between tv and 
juvenile delinquency, asked Mr. Fellows why 
no evidence was presented on the opposite 
viewpoint. 

The Kefauver reference was to testimony by 
Comr. Hennock that 7 out of 10 parents inter- 
viewed in a Gallup Poll believed television was 
responsible to some extent for juvenile delin- 
quency. Mr. Fellows said he had not heard of 
the poll, but that NARTB regularly informs 
its members of criticism against tv program- 
ming, as well as that in favor of it. 

Mr. Fellows said he was "not pleased" with 
some of the tv shows he had seen and criticized 
"block programming," a situation which he said 
had been improved in many cases by action of 
the Tv Code Review Board. 

Sen. Kefauver told Mr. Fellows: "I think you 
have a good association. But I think you are 



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Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 81 



A STRAIGHT ONE DOWN THE MIDDLE 




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going to have to stay right on top of it; and it 
seems to me that you are going to have to take 
the gloves off and not just present the positive 
side to your stations and networks, but you are 
going to have to be critical and firm." 

Edward H. Bronson 
NARTB Tv Code Affairs Director 

I am deeply appreciative of the opportunity 
to appear before this Committee and present to 
you the activities and progress of the Televi- 
sion Code Review Board of NARTB and the 
increasing influence of the Television Code 
since we reported to this Committee on Oct. 20 
of last year. 

A most important part of this activity is that 
of monitoring television programming and ad- 
vertising. This activity conducted by the Code 
Board staff of NARTB falls into two categories. 



First, review of television network originations, 
and second, schedules offered by local stations 
in individual cities. 

Network monitoring is conducted by three 
of the four Code Board staff members work- 
ing at NARTB headquarters here in Washing- 
ton and by four auxiliary monitors. 

Our current schedule of network monitoring 
provides reports on approximately 260 hours of 
programming each month, 300% over the 
figure reported last October. 

The second category, local station review, 
provides monthly reports on approximately 
280 hours of programming and covers an aver- 
age of 24 stations a month. In our last report 
we recorded 231 stations as subscribers to the 
Television Code. There are now 245 as well as 
all four of the national television networks. 

For this second category of monitoring, the 



Code Review Board retains a nationally known 
and recognized research firm with monitoring 
facilities in over 200 cities to do the actual 
monitoring. This is an increase of more than 
500% over the same activity five months ago. 

A special monitoring program is now being 
conducted relating to children's programming 
and covering 22 stations in nine cities. 

The Code Board staff has been enlarged to 
four fulltime persons working on the affairs of 
the Code Board and their administration. Also, 
plans are provided for additional staff personnel 
when needed for the Code Board's expanding 
activity. With regard to monitoring, however, 
the most significant growth is a result of re- 
taining a national research firm to assist in 
this work and thus adding the services of more 
than 600 trained monitors in over 200 cities. 

The Code Board staff has contacted nearly 
140 producers and distributors of film for use 
on television, to acquaint producers and dis- 
tributors with the Code, the activity of the 
Code Review Board and the need for care in 
development of the product they offer. 

Personal visits by the director of Television 
Code affairs and his assistant, have been in- 
stituted and will be continued. 

A concluding note should cover the pilot 
study of viewer attitudes the Television Code 
Review Board had in the field at the time we 
appeared before the subcommittee last October. 

This survey was just what its name implies — 
a pilot study. It was conducted by a nationally 
known and accepted survey firm long active in 
broadcast survey work for the guidance and 
information of the Code Review Board and 
staff to determine what might be done along 
similar lines and in greater detail in the future. 
This pilot study now is being reviewed by a sub- 
committee of the Code Review Board for this 
purpose. 

Mr. Bronson said the pilot study, by Amer- 
ican Research Bureau, would be "firmed up in 
30 days," and a report would be made to the 
subcommittee. 

Joseph V. Heffernan 
NBC Financial Vice President 

As a responsible medium for the presentation 
of ideas, NBC is deeply conscious of its position 
in relation to social problems of the day. It 
does not turn its back on them. It welcomes 
an opportunity to help in their solution. 

We have reflected this in the treatment of 
juvenile delinquency on our television network. 
We have dealt there on many occasions with 
this difficult subject. Our speakers have in- 
cluded distinguished public officials, judges, 
psychiatrists and criminologists. They have 
discussed juvenile delinquency or ways of com- 
batting that problem in 151 programs or seg- 
ments since the beginning of 1954. 

Some experts on juvenile delinquency have 
suggested that a definite answer "to the causes 
of juvenile crime can come only from a re- 
search project carried out on a very large scale 
and over a number of years by psychologists 
and sociologists attached to a university or 
foundation. They have said that such a project 
should deal broadly with the behavior patterns 
of children, and that it cannot confine itself to 
media influences, since other factors such as 
the influence of parents, economic conditions 
and world-wide tensions are clearly relevant. 

If a university or foundation should under- 
take such a project we should be glad to supply 
information and cooperate with them. 

We are opposed to government censorship 
and to any device by which government is em- 
powered to check the expression of opinion. 
We believe that in the long run any attempt to 



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Broadcasting • Telecasting 




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regulate program content by government decree 
will prove both unwise and unworkable. 

In taking this position we feel it puts more, 
and not less, responsibility on the broadcaster 
himself. It puts the control over program con- 
tent squarely up to him. 

The adoption by NBC of its code of broad- 
cast standards was a recognition of the respon- 
sibility we bear as a broadcaster. This system 
of self regulation, which the industry as a whole 
has followed in the industry code, is one alter- 
native to government regulation of program 
content. 

Another is the basic process of education 
itself. Our schools and colleges give substantial 
time to the encouragement of higher standards 
for books and literature generally, as they 
should. We have schools of journalism in 
many of our great universities. But television 
has already surpassed the printed word in its 
hold on the public mind. Should not. our 
schools and colleges keep pace by striving in 
that field also to encourage higher standards 
of listener demand for television programs. 

There is also the public itself. Our govern- 
ment does not tell them what to read. I don't 
believe it need tell them what to see or what 
to hear. 

The direct program control exercised by the 
public itself will be as effective as it is informed 
and discriminating. Most of the metropolitan 
papers carry the daily logs of all television 
stations in their area. Parents are afforded an 
opportunity in this way to guide the viewing 
habits of their children. 

The obligation to be discriminating attaches 
as well to the findings of those who make in- 
dustry surveys. Broad, shotgun condemnations 
of an industry as a whole, without recognition 
of the superior programs produced by many 
in that industry, serve only to discourage those 
who have struggled to do something better. 

Mr. Heffernan said he thought independent 
producers and distributors of films for tv 
should subscribe to the NARTB Television 
Code. He praised the testimony of Drs. Lazars- 
feld and Maccoby. 

Answering a question from Mr. Bobo on 
whether network-affiliated stations in a given 
market could agree to break up block pro- 
gramming of crime and violence shows, Mr. 
Heffernan said network competition is so fierce 
that "we hardly speak to each other." Such an 
agreement, he added, might be in violation of 
the antitrust laws. 

Asked by Sen. Wiley why the same network 
program could not be made available to more 
than one station in the same market, Mr. Hef- 
fernan said the stations are competitive. He 
said Congress had intended for stations to be 
competitive and the only reason for a regula- 
tory body (FCC) is to avoid electronic inter- 
ference. 

Frieda B. Hennock 
FCC Commissioner 

I know of no field where there is more im- 
portant work to be done by the Senate than in 
juvenile delinquency, and the attention this 
Committee is giving to this crucial problem is 
most timely. Nowhere can this Committee be 
more effective in stemming the excessive, con- 
centrated and exaggerated portrayal of crime 
and violence than in radio and television. 

Broadcasters who apply for station licenses 
and for license renewals are required to report 
in detail the percentage of time devoted to 
different types of programs such as entertain- 
ment, religion, news, education, discussion, etc. 
The objective is to ensure balanced program- 
ming responsive to the needs, interests and 
tastes of the communities served by the licensees. 

In addition to the foregoing, the FCC should 



impose a new requirement for reports by 
broadcasters of the incidence of acts and threats 
of crime and violence on all programs through- 
out the broadcast day. Moreover, the FCC 
should pursue a rigorous policy of refusing 
renewal of the licenses of offending stations 
which disregard their public service responsi- 
bilities by continuing to victimize immature 
audiences with a concentrated and profuse de- 
luge of crime, brutality, sadism and outright 
murder. 

The programming standards set out in the 
Code of the NARTB are excellent, but they 
have little effect on programming as the Code 
is voluntary and the NARTB is not in a posi- 
tion to enforce it effectively. The networks 
supply a large amount of tv programming and 
should be held responsible for its quality. The 
profusion of crime and violence in tv films 
mounts continuously. 

In addition, I urge the following steps: 

1. Women's organizations and all other civic, 
educational, welfare and religious groups should 
supplement the activities of established monitor- 
ing organizations in viewing and listening to tv 
and radio programs. All such groups should 
press the stations, the networks, the program 
sponsors and the FCC itself to bring to a halt 
the broadcast of pernicious programs which are 
making a significant contribution to the rise of 
juvenile delinquency. 

2. These public service groups should study 
the reports of the FCC licensees, note the inci- 
dence of acts and threats of crime and violence 
and file complaints against offending licensees. 

3. A National Radio & Tv Children's Week 
should be proclaimed during which there should 
be an evaluation of all radio and television pro- 
grams in terms of their suitability for children. 

4. An alert and articulate public should, as of 
right, present positive and constructive sugges- 
tions to licensees and sponsors as to its radio 
and tv program preferences for adults and chil- 
dren alike. The public should no longer take its 
radio and tv programming for granted, or con- 
tinue to accept passively anything the networks 
and broadcasters choose to offer. 

5. Since radio and tv operate in the public 
domain, the FCC should set up proper program- 
ming standards for both as soon as possible, and 
ensure their implementation by rigorous enforce- 
ment. 

6. And finally, the 252 channels reserved for 
educational television afford an unprecedented 
opportunity for guiding the young and enrich- 
ing the lives of all. Such noncommercial stations 
should be built immediately. They could arouse 
and stimulate interest in the arts, music, history, 
literature and science, to an extent heretofore 
unknown. Moreover, these stations can be built 
at a most reasonable cost and operated very 
economically. 

Comr. Hennock cited surveys in New York 
and Los Angeles which indicated a heavy 
incidence of violence in children's programming. 
She said a recent nationwide Gallup Poll 
showed 7 of each 10 parents questioned thought 
radio-tv mystery and crime programs could be 
blamed for teenage crime. 

She proposed that the FCC initiate "imme- 
diately" hearings to assemble facts, affording 
the public, broadcasters and others opportunity 
to comment. The FCC then, she said, should 
announce adoption of a firm policy against 
future license renewals of broadcasters who 
persist in programming an "unbalanced fare of 
violence." 

Miss Hennock said the FCC decided in 
1950 to call a conference to act on excess com- 
mercials, programming, etc., but the FCC has 
been busy getting tv stations on the air. She 
said her proposed hearing could be carried out 
"in short order" by a rule-making proceeding. 
"We can send questionnaires and have wit- 
nesses to collate facts and then we should an- 
nounce immediately in a policy of what we 



Page 86 



April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



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April 11, 1955 • Page 87 




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. GOVERNMENT ^— 

think is good and bad in tv programming," she 
said. 

William A. Wood 
General Manager 
Educational WQED (TV) Pittsburgh 

WQED (TV) is nonprofit, noncommercial 
and dedicated to the use of television for edu- 
cational purposes. WQED is supported finan- 
cially by foundation grants . . . funds from the 
public schools and contributions from the gen- 
eral public in the southwestern Pennsylvania 
community. 

WQED seeks to serve its community in some- 
what the same way the community is served 
by its schools, its universities, its art galleries, 
its libraries, its symphony orchestra, its legit- 
imate theatre. 

WQED does not claim any exclusivity in 
what it is doing. Some of the finest educational 
tv programs are on commercial air. But where- 
as such programs must occupy a small part of 
the total program schedule on a commercial 
station, such programs are the totality of our 
schedule. 

How does what WQED does relate to the 
question of juvenile delinquency today? 

A recent poll taken by the U. of Pittsburgh 
indicates that the juvenile delinquency problem 
is considered to be of primary importance by 
the people of our community. That is all we 
need to know. Then it automatically takes a 
priority as we plan our whole program schedule. 

We try to give a positive motivation to all 
our programs. Since we are not under the com- 
pulsions of a business with time for sale, we 
have no reason for existing unless we offer such 
motivations. 

School programs make the educational ex- 
perience richer and more stimulating to young- 
sters. Appreciation shows such as good music, 
ballet and art motivate worthwhile interests and 
pastimes, courses in History, English, Science, 
enable people of various ages to improve their 
minds and better their positions in life. And 
programs in family relations, scout training, 
presenting teen-age views and activities and 
home crafts and hobbies are all designed as 
direct deterrents of delinquency. 

The WQED program which should be of great 
interest to this committee is a daily hour long 
offering at 4:30 every afternoon on ch. 13 
known as The Children's Coi ner. 

Its audience ranges in age from 2 to 12 years. 
It counts an extraordinary number of adult 
viewers and its rating in the Pittsburgh area is 
30% of the available television audience. 

On The Children's Corner there has never 
been an act of violence of any kind. There are 
no cowboys, Indians or space men. Adult con- 
flict has no place there. The audience is there 
though. The show receives 4,000 letters a week. 

Learning is dispensed throughout this hour 
of programming, even though it is not for 
learning that the kids tune it in. They learn 
numbers, how to tell time, some words and 
phrases in French, simple nursery songs, crea- 
tiveness through art contests, poetry, zoology 
with live creatures, home hobbies and crafts, 
children's stories . . . instruments of the orches- 
tra and even a little juggling and prestedigitation. 

An audience on shows like this is steadily 
exposed to actions and ideas and truths which 
would be patently incapable of having any detri- 
mental effect on it, and there is some indication 
they have a salutary effect on the youngsters 
at the other end. I do not by saying this mean 
to take any position against other tv programs 
for youngsters at all, but we are finding that it 
is good to offer this kind — to have it there if 
the kids want it and in Pittsburgh they want it. 



Dr. Paul F. Lazarsfeld 
Professor of Sociology, Columbia U. 

Dr. Lazarsfeld said three factors are to be 
considered in studies of tv's effect on children: 
(1) Academicians — "We need a push to study 
the effects of tv." He said academic organiza- 
tions require funds, most of which come from 
foundations. (2) Foundations — 'They feel that 
permanent direction of a study never should be 
left to the academicians;" but no foundation 
has dared to do the necessary investigations in 
television, although they played many roles in 
formulating code standards for radio and the 
movies; that foundations have been made timid 
by last year's investigations by a House group 
investigating tax-exempt foundations. (3) 
Radio-tv industry — The industry spends money 
on research, but its money has to be spent 
"close to its operations." 

He said there is a great need for new and 
untried programs. "But who could write them?" 
he asked, "and what would the poor children 
do if they had to listen to 'good' programs?" 

He noted that as children grow older their 
tastes change to programs intended for a higher- 
age group, thus outgrowing and ignoring the 
very programs claimed to be harmful. He also 
asked how these undesirable programs get on 
the air. "No one thinks the manufacturer 
(sponsor) is trying to corrupt children." 

Dr. Lazarsfeld said everyone overlooks the 
tremendous amount of material used by tele- 
vision. There are not enough good people to 
get good shows on the air, he said. He warned 
against using research as a panacea, saying that 
"taste" cannot be settled by research. He felt 
there is a danger research is being used as an 
alibi. 

He made three suggestions : ( 1 ) that the 
subcommittee use its influence to get the Na- 
tional Research Foundation to do research (in 
the name of science), calling it "measurements 
of facts," and extending the work to the 
"present problems"; (2) that such promotion 
and planning activities as "White House Con- 
ferences" be held to stress the problem, and 
(3) that efforts be made to stop witch-hunting 
among foundations by congressional com- 
mittees. 

He said he "competes" with tv in his own 
home by playing "chamber music" and by talk- 
ing with the children. 

Dr. Eleanor E. Maccoby 
Harvard U. Social Relations Department 

I have been asked to testify this morning on 
a study of television and children which we did 
in Massachusetts some four years ago, about 
our more recent work, and the bearing of our 
findings on juvenile delinquency. 

In the study done in Cambridge, Mass., in 
the winter of 1950-51, we worked only with 
families who had children between the ages 
of 4 and 17 (inclusive). We talked to 332 
mothers, and these mothers had 622 children. 

An important question about television in 
children's lives is this: What does it take the 
place of? When we compared children who 
had tv with those who did not, we found that 
about a third of the tv time apparently comes 
from the other mass media. That is, the chil- 
dren cut down on their reading and radio 
listening in order to watch tv. But it isn't an 
even trade. The extra time is taken from out- 
door play, hobbies, helping around the house, 
and some from sleep. 

Now what about the effects of tv on family 
life? It has been said that Henry Ford scattered 
the American family and tv brought them back 
together again. Our study found that there was 
considerable truth in this: the total amount of 
time children spend with members of their 




Page 88 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



Ruth Randall 

The school teacher who owns an oil company 

Ruth Randall teaches Latin at San Bernardino High 
School, San Bernardino, California. 
In 1939 she invested part of her savings in 50 shares of 
Union Oil Stock. This makes her — along with some forty 
thousand other people — an owner of the 45th largest indus- 
trial company in the country. 

And entitles her to examine the report card on our sixty- 
fifth year of business. 

It was the largest in our history. Our customers paid us 
$351,731,678. We didn't keep all of this, of course. 

16.8% we paid to our 8700 employees as wages and benefits. 

4.8% went for taxes. (This does not include $60,000,000 
additional in fuel taxes which we collected for the government.) 

Union Oil Company OF CALIFORNIA 

MANUFACTURERS OF ROYAL TRITON, THE AMAZING PURPLE MOTOR OIL 



68.2% — by far the lion's share — we divided among more 
than fifteen thousand other companies and individuals with 
whom we do business. 

This left us net earnings of 10.2%. From which we paid 
shareholders like Miss Randall 4.5% as dividends for the use 
of their money, and reinvested the remaining 5.7% in neces- 
sary expansion and modernization of facilities. 

We hope Miss Randall is pleased with this report. We are 
certain she should be pleased with herself. For in wisely 
investing in American industry for her own security, she has 
helped to create a higher standard of living for everyone. 

* * * # 
YOUR COMMENTS ARE INVITED. Write: The President, Union Oil 
Company oj California, Union Oil Building, Los Angeles 17, California. 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 89 



family does go up when the family gets tv. 
But what about the quality of the time family 
members spend together? When they are all 
watching television, there is a minimum of talk. 

One final point about this question of family 
influence: when children are watching tv with 
their parents, the parents may not be exercising 
much active influence in the sense of guidance 
and instruction, but at least they know where 
their children are. 

I would like to discuss now the question of 
the effects on children of the kind of thing they 
see on tv programs. May I say at the outset 
that this is a question about which we have very 
few solid facts. 

The first question we must ask ourselves is 
why children are so interested in tv in the first 
place. There are many reasons, of course, in- 
cluding a natural and healthy curiosity about 
the outside world. But one motive is a desire 
for escape from unpleasant situations in real 
life. We have found that the children who 
spend the most time watching tv are the chil- 
dren who are most severely punished by their 
parents, whose parents are not particularly 
affectionate toward them, and who are subject 
to many restrictions on their freedom of action 
in the house. 

There is no doubt that children pick up all 
sorts of content from the programs they watch. 
We have found that if a child is angry or up- 
set when he sees a movie, he is more likely to 
remember the aggressive content a week later. 

I have been talking about how children can 
have aggressive feelings aroused or quieted by 
tv programs. We must not overlook the fact 
that a child can also learn from tv that wrong- 
doing will be punished. Some of the things he 
learns from programs, in other words, may op- 



erate to inhibit aggressive activity by providing 
the child with warnings about the possible 
consequences of his actions. 

May I say that it has been a sobering ex- 
perience for me to be asked to give "expert" 
testimony to the members of this committee 
about the kind and amount of influence tv 
has on children. I have been forced to take 
stock of what we know and the amount is not 
impressive. Scientific knowledge accumulates 
slowly, and tv is very new. 

Dr. Ralph S. Banay 
Columbia U. Research Psychiatrist 

Abstract of the testimony of Ralph S. Banay, 
M.D., psychiatrist consultant to the Bureau of 
Prisons of the Department of Justice, editor 
of The Journal of Social Therapy and author 
of Youth in Despair. 

Most children nowadays spend several hours 
watching their [tv] set, sometimes indiscrim- 
inately without supervision of parents or their 
selection of their program to be viewed. Fre- 
quent knob turning by children usually leads 
to a presentation which is saturated with 
action, fights, gunplay, murder or other mani- 
festations of violence. A subconscious identifi- 
cation with the personalities and events of the 
show make the children more susceptible to 
permanent impression, suggestion and condi- 
tioning effect of these presentations. 

Children might even see the images out of 
sequence as isolated events, paying no heed to 
the conception of the good being rewarded and 
the evil punished. They might be under the 
spell of the drama and absorbed so completely 
that their own aggressive tendencies become 
activated not just in fantasy life, but in reality. 



Exposing them to persistent viewing of vio- 
lence and creating false images and conceptions 
of life and its mores and customs we allow an > 
unfavorable subconscious conditioning of chil- 
dren in our homes by an instrument which 
could be under different circumstances the most 
progressive and unlimited disseminator of cul- I 
ture, education and moral conditioning. 

Mrs. Louise S. Walker 
Audio-Visual Education Supervisor 
Montgomery County (Md.) Schools 

Mrs. Walker described efforts of educational 
groups in the District of Columbia area to get \ 
ch. 26 (Greater Washington Educational Tv 
Corp.) on the air. She said commercial sta- j 
tions have aired some in-school programs, but 
this method is not entirely satisfactory since 
the educator is never sure of the time because 
it is "changed frequently," and because there is ! 
little time for rehearsal. Commercial stations, 
she said, are not very conversant with educa- 
tional methods. 

FREE CAMPAIGN TIME 
ADVOCATED BY HENNOCK 

FCC commissioner urges that 
Senate prod FCC to see that 
time is released by stations. 

FCC Comr. Frieda B. Hennock last week said j 
she thinks candidates for Congress should get 
free time on radio-tv for campaigning. 

Testifying before the Senate Juvenile Delin- 
quency Subcommittee (see story, page 79), she j 
urged that the Senate "call on the FCC to see I 
that this time is released." 

When the subject was brought up by Sen. ; 
Alexander Wiley (R-Wis.), a member of the I 
subcommittee, Comr. Hennock said, "You 
should get together in the Senate and call on I 
the industry and the Commission and see to it 
this time is released to the people to bring them j 
their candidates." 

She suggested that Sen. Wiley get up on the 
Senate floor and "alert brother senators to i 
the problem," so the Senate can send a resolu- 
tion to the FCC and "call on the industry to 
find how much time is available for all parties 
to use in political elections and throughout 
the year." 

She asked the Wisconsin Republican, who 
comes up for re-election next year, to wire \ 
stations in his home state asking for free time, 
and if they refuse, "I will take it up with the 
Commission and we will be in touch with the j 
licensees." 

Sen. Wiley had commented that tv was "pro- 
hibitive to the poor man," adding that a group j 
backing a candidate could corner all available 
time. 

Sen. Estes Kefauver (D-Tenn.), subcommit- 
tee chairman who presided at the hearing, 
afterward told a reporter he thought "there 
should be a larger allocation of public time." j 
He said tv expenses are "so terrific that it gives 
the advantage to the fellow with a lot of 
money." 

The Senate Elections Subcommittee, headed 
by Sen. Thomas C. Hennings (D-Mo.), will 
hold hearings tomorrow (Tuesday) and 
Wednesday on a bill to increase campaign ' 
expense ceilings. Representatives of the radio- 
tv industry have been invited to testify. Hear- 
ings also are scheduled April 19-20 and 26-27. 
Broadcast representatives have been invited to ^ 
appear at one of the later hearings. 



The Fabulous "Girl on the Go" 

DRUE SMITH 

Just named Chattanooga's 
"BUSINESS WOMAN 
OF THE YEAR" 

Leading CHATTANOOGA RADIO PERSONALITY 
for many years! Drue knows everybody, everywhere, 
and everybody knows . . . and LISTENS to DRUE. 





Limited Participations are avail- 
able. 10:05-10:30 a.m., 2:15- 
2:30 p.m., Monday thru Friday. 

This is a hot tip! 

f Ask BR AN HAM ! 

D A niA NBC AFFILIATE IN 
KADKJ CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



CARTER M. PARHAM, President 



KEN FLENNIKEN, General Manager 



1 



Page 90 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting > 




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ELECTRIC COMPANIES ARE SPENDING $3 BILLION A YEAR TO 
DOUBLE THE POWER SUPPLY BY 1965 1 





BlG PLANS FOR ELECTRIC TOMORROWS in THE making! 1 

THE ELECTRIC COMPANIES HAVE. DEVELOPED PLANS FOR POWER 
DAMS AT IDAHO'S HELL'S CANYO^ON COOSA RIVER IN THE SOUTH, 
ON RIVERS IN CALIFORNIA AND OTHER AREAS. THEY CAN DO I 
THESE BIG JOBS CHEAPER AMP SOONER THAN THE FEDERALf 
GOVERNMENT COULD. 



«WU ARETHERZ"- CBS TELEVISION 

-WITNESS HISTORY'S GREAT EVENTS 



DOEW ELECTRIC HELPERS FOR BETTER LIVING.' 

RESEARCH KEEPS BRINGING YOU EXCITIW6 NEW PRODUCTS- 
LIKE THE ELECTRIC HEAT PUMP THAT PICKS UP HEAT FROM 
WATER OR AIR TO KEEP YOUR HOME WARM IN WINTER, AND 
REVERSES ITS OPERATION FOR SUMMER COOUm. 



IS FLOWING TO AMERICA FROM ELECTRIC LIGHT AND POWER 
COMPANIES... BUT CERTAIN PERSUASIVE GROUPS STILL WANT 
TO PUSH THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT FARTHER ANP FARTHER 
INTO THE ELECTRIC BUSINESS... EVEN IF THAT MEANS A WASTE 
OF TAX DOLLARS AND A SOCIALISTIC U.S.A. 




"NAMES REQUEST FROM THIS MAGAZINE 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April II, 1955 • Page 91 




Page 92 • April 11, 1955 



GOVERNMENT 



LAMB BID TO DROP BRIBE ISSUE DENIED 



Commission says the Lamb 
charges are 'grave' and neces- 
sary to the proceeding. In tes- 
timony, WICU (TV) owner re- 
peats denial of Red ties. 
FCC REFUSED last week to eliminate from 
its license renewal hearing on Edward Lamb's 
WICU (TV) Erie, Pa., the issue concerning 
charges by Mr. Lamb that Commission em- 
ployes caused at least one bribe to be offered 
to secure false testimony against him. 

Turning down a petition by Mr. Lamb's coun- 
sel seeking deletion of the issue [B«T, March 7], 
the Commission said the issue "contains certain 
grave charges made by Edward Lamb, the facts 
with respect to which are material and necessary 
of development in the said proceeding." 

The renewal hearing presently is in recess 
until April 18, when Mr. Lamb will resume his 
appearance before Examiner Herbert Sharfman 
to answer questions by the FCC Broadcast 
Bureau. He has appeared for two days thus far 
[B»T, April 4]. The case has been underway 
since last September. Primary issue involved is 
whether Mr. Lamb lied when he told FCC he 
never had communist ties. Denying the charges, 
Mr. Lamb has called the hearing a "political 
frameup." 

In refusing to eliminate the bribe issue, FCC 
concluded its hearing is concerned with Mr. 
Lamb's qualifications as chief stockholder in 
WICU "and that the factual basis for the afore- 
mentioned charges is relevant to a determina- 
tion of such qualifications, and is therefore 
relevant to the question whether the grant of 
the application herein would be in the public 
interest, convenience and necessity." 

WICU had explained to the Commission that 
the issue "relates solely to averments made in 
a certain complaint filed by the applicant in the 
U. S. District Court" last summer. The court 
suit was an unsuccessful effort to halt the FCC 
hearing and now is under appeal, hence WICU 
felt inclusion of this issue in the matters set for 
hearing before FCC might involve prejudicial 
premature disclosure of evidence in advance of 
the court trial. 

Earlier, Examiner Sharfman refused a com- 
panion motion by WICU asking immediate 
termination of the case and renewal of license 
on the ground the Broadcast Bureau had not 
presented any evidence worthy of reply [B«T, 
March 21]. 

At a Saturday session before Examiner 
Sharfman on April 2, Mr. Lamb repeated his 
earlier testimony that he did not recall ever 
being a member or advisor of the International 
Labor Defense nor member of the American 
Committee for the Protection of the Foreign 
Born. 

He also did not remember making any con- 
tributions to those organizations, but after the 
Broadcast Bureau introduced income tax re- 
turns for 1944-46 showing he did contribute in 
those years, Mr. Lamb thanked the bureau for 
the copies and for refreshing his memory. He 
noted the organizations were "perfectly legal" 
at that time. 

FCC also referred to an affidavit to the Com- 
mission showing Mr. Lamb's contributions to 
various groups from 1944-54, prepared by a 
member of Mr. Lamb's staff and legal counsel, 
which did not disclose the contributions to the 
two organizations. Mr. Lamb said he thought 
the affidavit may have been prepared from 
check stubs, indicating the contributions might 
have been cash. 

At one point during questioning about the 
contributions, Russell Morton Brown, counsel 



for Mr. Lamb, pointed out that his co-counsel, 
ex-U. S. Attorney General J. Howard McGrath, 
"suggests that at this time the International 
Labor Defense was an organization for which 
the Bureau of Internal Revenue was accustomed 
to allow deductions from income tax returns, 
so you, of course, will recognize that the 
Attorney General's list of 1947 hadn't come into 
existence at the time." 

Mr. Lamb, upon being shown a summary of 
proceedings of the sixth national convention of 
the American Committee for the Protection of 
the Foreign Born, in Cleveland in May 1942, 




WITNESS LAMB 

Gets his day in court 



recalled that he did preside at one session, but 
it was noted that the late Wendell Willkie, 
Harold Ickes and other prominent people also 
were identified as taking part and President 
Roosevelt sent a message of greetings. 

Mr. Lamb, recalling Mr. Willkie was the Re- 
publican Presidential candidate in 1940, com- 
mented, "I can tell you a great deal of that 
connection, if you like. For Wendell Willkie, I 
wrote several of his speeches." 

Narvig Counsel Moves 
To Dismiss Perjury Charges 

MOTION to dismiss a nine-count perjury in- 
dictment against Mrs. Marie Natvig, contro- 1 
versial turn-about witness in FCC's license re- I 
newal hearing on Edward Lamb's WICU (TV) 
Erie, Pa., was filed last week in the U. S. Dis- 
trict Court for the District of Columbia by 
Mrs. lean P. Dwyer, Legal Aid Society counsel 
for the 51-year-old Miami Beach divorcee. 

The motion, charging the allegations in the 
indictment were "vague," "repetitious" and 
"ambiguous," asked for postponement of the 
trial, scheduled April 25 in Washington, and | 
requested that the case be heard in another J 
district. The pleading claimed that a fair trial 
of Mrs. Natvig at this time would be impossible 
because of the "tremendous publicity" she has 
received. Removal of the case from Washington 
was asked on the ground that most juries there 
are composed of government workers. 

Part of the allegations of the indictment con- j 
cern Mrs. Natvig's charge that FCC counsel 
coerced her into testifying falsely against Mr. 
Lamb. She presently is free under $2,500 bond. 
Court argument on the dismissal motion is 
scheduled April 18. 

Broadcasting • Telecasting. 



UHFTV STATIONS 
ASK UNMIXED STATUS 

WJPB-TV Fairmont, W. Va., 

seeks vhf, while WNAO-TV 

Raleigh, N. C, and KVDO-TV 

Corpus Christi, Tex., urge all 

uhf in their respective markets. 

ON THE HEELS of the FCC's first move to 
consider de-intermixing uhf and vhf tv in 
four markets [B«T, April 4], petitions were 
filed with the Commission last week to renew 
earlier pleas that Corpus Christi and Raleigh- 
Durham be made all-uhf areas and another 
asked that educational ch. 5 at Weston, W. 
Va., be reassigned for commercial use at Fair- 
mont. 

Ch. 35 WJPB-TV Fairmont, now suspended, 
told FCC it has suffered "severe competition" 
from vhf stations at Steubenville, Ohio, Pitts- 
burgh and Wheeling, W. Va. Noting educa- 
tional ch. 5 has not been put to use, WJPB-TV 
said it has received "upwards of 5,000" cards, 
letters, calls and petitions to resume operation 
on ch. 35 or switch to ch. 5. 

Ch. 28 WNAO-TV Raleigh petitioned the 
Commission to place educational reservations 
upon ch. 1 1 at Durham and ch. 5 at Raleigh, 
requiring ch. 11 WTVD (TV) Durham to 
switch to ch. 40, presently carrying an educa- 
tional reservation. At Raleigh, ch. 22 now is 
reserved. 

WPTF and WRAL, contestants for ch. 5 at 
Raleigh, presently are awaiting an examiner's 
initial decision on their bids. 

At Corpus Christi, ch. 22 KVDO-TV there, 
the only tv outlet on the air in that market, re- 
newed its petition of last fall asking that the 
city be made an all-uhf area. Initial decisions 
have been issued by the FCC proposing grants 
for the two vhf channels assigned there. 

KRIS Corpus Christi is favored for ch. 6 in 
one initial ruling while KSIX there is favored 
for ch. 10 in the other. 

Four Markets Considered 

In its first move toward de-intermixture of 
certain markets a fortnight ago, the Commission 
ordered rule-making proceedings to shuffle 
channels at Evansville, Ind., Hartford, Conn., 
Peoria, 111., and Madison, Wis. FCC would 
make them all-uhf areas and called for com- 
ments by May 2. 

The move came only three weeks after the 
Commission told the Senate Interstate & 
Foreign Commerce Committee that it was con- 
sidering "selective" de-intermixture. This was 
in FCC's reply to the Plotkin and Jones reports 
[B»T, March 21]. 

Reviewing FCC's allocation plan in West 
Virginia, WJPB-TV pointed out that Clarks- 
burg's ch. 12 (WBLK-TV, under construction) 
and Weston's educational ch. 5 "are the only 
vhf stations in an area stretching from Charles- 
ton on the south to Wheeling in the north, to 
Columbus, Ohio, in the west and Harrisonburg, 
Va., in the east, with an estimated population 
of 750,000. In its allocation plan the Com- 
mission did give consideration to other central 
West Virginia communities such as Fairmont 
and Clarksburg with uhf channels." 

WJPB-TV argued that "only in Fairmont was 
any broadcaster willing to take the calculated 
risk necessary to pioneer uhf television under 
the allocation plan set up by the Commission. 
That uhf pioneer was. your petitioner. WJPB- 
TV in face of severe competition offered by 




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Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 93 



GOVERNMENT 



vhf stations in Pittsburgh, Steubenville and 
Wheeling, whose signals are amplified and car- 
ried over the Fairmont-Clarksburg Tv Cable 
Co. community antenna systems to more than 
5,000 homes in the area, was able to stay on 
the air for one year, despite local advertisers' 
reluctance to advertise because WJPB-TV was 
not on the cables and the national advertiser's 
prejudice against uhf television." 

With suspension of its ch. 35 service, WJPB- 
TV pointed out that "many thousands of view- 
ers are without adequate and in many instances 
any television service, despite the great sums of 
money expended in purchasing television re- 
ceivers, converters and other equipment to 
receive WJPB-TV. 

"Most of these viewers and owners of televi- 
sion receivers are in the lower or medium in- 
come brackets whose livelihood, in the main, is 
derived from the depressed coal industry and 
cannot afford to pay the high installation 
charges ($137.50) and monthly rental fees 
($3.75) necessary to connect with the Fairmont- 
Clarksburg Tv Cable Co." 

WJPB-TV told the Commission that if it re- 
assigns ch. 5 for commercial use it will "im- 
mediately file" for a station with studios in 
Weston and an auxiliary studio in Fairmont. 
It would locate its transmitter and tower "in 
the best possible site to cover Weston and an 
area serving more than three-quarters of a 
million persons" and would afford West Vir- 
ginia Research Center Inc. (whose original 
pleading secured reservation of ch. 5 at Weston) 
and all other educational groups "a minimum of 
25% of the station's air time without cost or 
restrictions to the educators." 



WJPB-TV further agreed to allow West 
Virginia Research Center after two years to 
purchase the station "at a price to be agreed 
upon by an unbiased group of television con- 
sultants and appraisers selected by the edu- 
cators and WJPB-TV." 

At Corpus Christi, KVDO-TV told FCC 
that "in view of the recent action of the Com- 
mission in instituting rule-making proceedings 
looking toward de-intermixture in Peoria, 
Evansville-Hatfield, Madison and Hartford, it 
is clear that the Commission is required to 
grant" its petition too. 

"Corpus Christi presents a classic situation 
for the aplication of the principles to be con- 
sidered in the rule-making proceedings referred 
to above," KVDO-TV argued. "Clearly, if de- 
intermixture is to be based on principle, the 
Commission cannot pick and choose the com- 
munities in which the uhf situation will be 
corrected. Where, as here, a proper petition has 
been filed, the Commission is required to apply 
its allocation principles with consistency and 
fairness to all communities." 

Classic Situation 

KVDO-TV contended that in the case of 
Corpus Christi, the two vhf channels assigned 
there can be used for reassignment in other 
areas "in a more efficient and equitable manner 
than any of the other proposals for de-intermix- 
ture." The uhf station noted both chs. 6 and 10 
"can be reassigned in areas which presently are 
without television service and which almost cer- 
tainly will continue to be television white areas 
if vhf channels are not made available to them." 

KVDO-TV noted ch. 6 particularly could be 



switched to several cities in western Texas 
"which do not lie within even a Grade B cover- 
age contour of a television station. Ch. 10 may 
be reassigned in the area surrounding Victoria, 
Tex., which also is a substantial tv white area. 
It is to be noted that during the allocation pro- 
ceeding the Commission denied a request for the 
assignment of a vhf channel to Victoria." 

In other words, KVDO-TV contended, if the 
two vhf channels are allocated elsewhere as 
proposed, "television service will be made pos- 
sible for the first time in other parts of the 
United States and at the same time healthy and 
competitive television service will be provided 
in the Corpus Christi market." 

In its Raleigh-Durham de-intermixture plead- 
ing, WNAO-TV pointed out that it began op- 
eration in mid-1953 "when no other dependable, 
local television service was available" and today 
estimates there are 125,000 sets there capable 
of receiving uhf. The public investment in uhf 
amounts to more than $25 million, the station 
said. 

Arguing for de-intermixture, WNAO-TV 
claimed "it has been shown in many cities that a 
uhf station cannot compete successfully with 
two or more vhf stations and that such com- 
petition usually results in the termination of the 
uhf service to the public. 

"Because of the great number of recent fail- 
ures among uhf stations directly attributable to 
vhf domination of competition, the Commission 
should again consider whether its present basis 
of allocation of vhf and uhf stations in the com- 
munities of Raleigh and Durham wDl serve the 
public interest and whether uhf television will be 
able to survive and compete effectively in the 
market." 

Since filing its previous petition for de-inter- 
mixture, WNAO-TV said it has operated for 
more than six months in competition with ch. 1 1 
WTVD (TV) Durham and contended the effects 
of the vhf service "have been greatly detrimental 
to uhf. Since the commencement of vhf opera- 
tion at Durham, several television set dealers 
have promoted the sale of vhf-only receivers, 
advertising that the public may receive television 
service without buying all-channel equipment. 
Following the destructive Hurricane Hazel in 
October 1954, many set owners did not replace 
their uhf antennas because of the promotion 
of vhf service in this manner." 

KXLA Ruling Issued 

BECAUSE of a condition in its 1948 grant that 
it must protect Class I-B KFAB Omaha, KXLA 
Pasadena, Calif., would be required to reduce 
its nighttime power from 10 kw to 1 kw, ac- 
cording to an initial decision announced last 
week by FCC. KXLA is assigned 10 kw full- 
time on 1110 kc, directional. Stemming from 
a hearing ordered in 1950, the initial ruling 
would require KXLA to submit an application 
within 60 days covering the nighttime power 
reduction. KFAB is assigned 50 kw on 1110 
kc, directional night. 

Uhf WKNY-TV Allowed 
Move to Lower Channel 

TWO UHF STATIONS lost their pleadings for 
lower uhf channels last week but ch. 66 WKNY- 
TV Kingston, N. Y., convinced FCC that its 
technical troubles were sufficient to merit ap- 
proval of its bid to switch to ch. 21 at Pough- 
keepsie. 

The Commission turned down a petition by 
ch. 61 WHUM-TV Reading, Pa., for change to 
ch. 15 and refused a request by ch. 41 KCOR- 
TV San Antonio for change to ch. 14. 

In the WKNY-TV action, the Commission 
granted immediate substitution of educational 



you're right 

on cue! 

No need to fluff your lines. There's 
only one CUE to follow when your 
stage is set in Akron. Why, they 
!ove us in our own home town (see 
our Hooper) . . . one CUE from 
us and they'll love you, too. 



more MUSIC 
more NEWS 
more OFTEN 



Wcue 

Akron's only independent .we're home folks 
Tim Elliot, President 



John E. Pearson Co., National Representatives 
after February 10, 1955 




Page 94 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



"A Mighty Tough Place To Find A Stray Cow" 



There it lay at his feet — a chasm three miles long and a 
thousand feet deep — with myriads of fantastically shaped 
spires and turrets, towering in flaming array. And Ebenezer 
Bryce, viewing for the first time the horseshoe-shaped basin 
that now bears his name, is reported to have said, "A mighty 
tough place to find a stray cow;" 

Today Bryce Canyon National Park is still a tough place 
to find a cow. But among its bright-colored formations you'll 
find delight for the eye and food for the imagination. Here 



you can ride the breath-taking Rim Road, called "the most 
colorful 20 miles in the world," or go below the rim to 
places as colorful as their names — Silent City. . .Peek-a-Boo 
Canyon . . . the Queen's Garden. 

Geologists will tell you this is erosion at work, with frost, 
snow and rain patiently sculpturing the soft rocks of Utah's 
Pink Cliffs. The less scientific have called it music frozen 
in stone. The music wasn't identified. It could be "America 
the Beautiful." 



Sinclair Salutes the National Grange 

Founded in 1866, the Grange is the oldest and largest farm fra- 
ternity in the world and has always had a natural interest in 
conservation and in our National Parks. With headquarters at 744 
Jackson Place, Washington, D. C., this organization for many 
years has been active in promoting soil and water conservation for 
the farming lands upon which our economy depends. We salute 
the Grange for its part in creating in Americans the understanding 
and cooperation so necessary to accomplish this worthy objective. 



MOTORISTS — if you would like to visit the 
National Parks, the Sinclair Tour Service 
will help you plan your trip. Write: Sinclair 
Oil Corporation, Sinclair Oil Building, 600 
Fifth Avenue, New York 20, New York. 



SINCLAIR 

A Great Name in Oil 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 95 



ch. 27 for reserved ch. 21 at Hanover, N. H., 
and substitution of ch. 75 for 27 at Concord, 
freeing ch. 21 for use at Poughkeepsie. WKNY- 
TV is located midway between this city and 
Kingston. 

Recalling precedent cases to support its 
WKNY-TV ruling, FCC noted Hanover and 
Concord "are apparently not ready to proceed 
immediately with the establishment of uhf tele- 
vision stations on the lower uhf channels as- 
signed to them. It is expected that the equip- 
ment problems connected with operation on 
higher uhf channels will be eliminated by the 
time such communities are ready to proceed 
with television." Making the changes now will 
"provide for a more effective utilization of 
available facilities," FCC said. 

WKNY-TV sought the change, FCC ex- 
plained, "due to certain technical difficulties" 
on ch. 66. FCC noted "the station has been 
unable to operate with full power and that as 
a result of this and other equipment problems 
it has not been able to cover its contemplated 
service area with the necessary signal strength." 
WKNY-TV will retain its present site. 

KCOR-TV San Antonio, still in the construc- 
tion stage and proposing a Spanish-language 
operation, sought to acquire use of ch. 14 by 
substituting ch. 30 for 14 at Seguin, Tex. In 
its denial order, FCC noted Seguin organiza- 
tions protested the switch, including KWED 
there. 

The order said the channel switch must be 
refused as long as some interest in tv is found 
in Seguin and also concluded KCOR-TV "has 
not established . . . that operation on ch. 41 
in San Antonio at this time will be unsatis- 
factory. 



FCC PROPOSES 
3 VHF GRANTS 

Seattle, Omaha and Jackson- 
ville, Fla., initial decisions are 
issued by Commission. 

PROPOSED vhf grants for Seattle, Wash., 
Omaha, Neb., and Jacksonville, Fla., were an- 
nounced last week by FCC in three separate 
initial decisions by hearing examiners. 

The initial decision for Seattle would au- 
thorize ch. 7 for Queen City Broadcasting Co. 
(KIRO-AM-FM), while denying competing 
applications of KXA Inc. (KXA) and Puget 
Sound Broadcasting Co. (KVI). 

At Omaha, proposed grant for ch. 7 would 
go to Herald Corp. (World Publishing Co.) 
with a denial to the rival application of KFAB 
Broadcasting Co. (KFAB). World publishes 
the Omaha World-Herald. 

In Jacksonville, the ch. 12 grant is favored 
for Jacksonville Broadcasting Corp. (WPDQ). 
In the same ruling denials were proposed for 
competing City of Jacksonville (WJAX-AM- 
FM) and Florida-Georgia Television Co. 

Florida-Georgia is headed by George H. 
Hodges and Alex Brest, Jacksonville con- 
tractors, 26% interest. A 19% interest is held 
by Harold S. Cohn, owner of WRHC Jackson- 
ville, and among other stockholders are Mitchell 
Wolf son of WTVJ (TV) Miami with 5% plus 
voting control over another 10% held by Wolf- 
son-Meyer Corp. 

In the Seattle ch. 7 proposed grant, FCC Ex- 
aminer Thomas H. Donahue concluded that in 



an analysis of those criteria where a preference 
among the competing applicants exist, KIRO 
has been found equal to KXA and superior to 
KVI in the areas of civic consciousness, di- 
versification of business interests and television 
preparation. The examiner also contended 
KIRO was superior on integration of owner- 
ship and management and slightly superior on 
the basis of its television proposal. 

Most telling point in the record, according to 
the examiner, is KIRO's "vast superiority of 
past operation." 

The examiner referred to charges made dur- 
ing the hearing against the qualifications of 
Saul Haas, KIRO president, and said the 
charges were of no significance, except for one. 
That one was an allegation that Mr. Haas, then 
a U. S. Collector of Customs at Seattle, had 
gained ownership in KIRO 20 years ago, while 
conferring with a Charles Thomsen, KIRO 
stockholder, on a tax case. 

The examiner pointed out that another wit- 
ness had testified that Mr. Haas had bought 
into KIRO at some risk during a period of 
national depression. The examiner also said 
that "this single instance of wrong doing was 
the only blemish on Haas' character that has 
been established. Further, Haas has over the 
past 20 years been responsible for the operation 
of a radio station of not inconsiderable overall 
merit from the public interest standpoint. In 
light of these factors, to disqualify him here 
on the grounds of a single instance of wrong 
doing is unjustified." 

At Omaha, Examiner Isadore A. Honig pre- 
ferred Herald Corp. over KFAB on the grounds 
of wider local ownership, greater civic participa- 
tion and business interest diversification on the 
part of principals, public service achievement 
record of the Herald Corp.'s parent newspaper 
and diversification of mass media. The ex- 
aminer noted KFAB is owned 47% by the 
Journal-Star Printing Co., publisher of the only 
daily papers at Lincoln, Neb., whose combina- 
tion rate practices he scored. 

Journal-Star Printing Co., he cited, is com- 
plexly interconnected in ownership with some 
10 other publishing interests in the Midwest 
and including WIBA-AM-FM Madison, Wis., 
KGLO-AM-FM-TV Mason City, Iowa, and 
WTAD-AM-FM and KHQA-TV Quincy, 111. 
The examiner, however, pointed out KFAB's 
"superior" record of radio performance and 
found KFAB entitled to preference on integra- 
tion of ownership with management. 

In the Jacksonville case, Examiner Charles 
J. Frederick pointed out that WPDQ was en- 
titled to preference on the basis of integration 
of ownership and management. James R. Stock- 
ton, president, and Robert R. Feagin, executive 
vice president, holding 80% of WPDQ, would 
be active in the day-to-day operation of the 
tv station, it was pointed out. Only 51% of the 
stock of Florida-Georgia is held by persons con- 
cerned with such operations. The city commis- 
sioners of the City of Jacksonville would have 
little to do with day-to-day station operation, 
the examiner further concluded. 

Two New Fm Grants Issued 

TWO new fm stations were authorized by FCC 
last week, one for WNVA Norton, Va., and the 
other for Robert H. Wilkinson trading as 
Colorado Recording Co., Boulder, Colo. 

At Norton, WNVA received a permit for fm 
ch. 299 (107.7 mc) with effective radiated 
power of 4.6 kw. Mr. Wilkinson received ch. 
247 (97.3 mc) with ERP of 5.9 kw. Trans- 
mitter of latter would be remote controlled. 




ENIK OAli 



VVe've had a look at the 1954 figures 
that will be published in the May 10,1955 
issue of SALES MANAGEMENT. 

Heavenly daze — we're going higher than a 
kite! WIOD's four county market — which 
includes DADE (Miami), BROWARD 
(Ft. Lauderdale), PALM BEACH (West Palm 
Beach) and MONROE (Key West)— will show 
a population increase of over 100,000 — 
Effective Buying Income and Retail Sales 
increases in the 100 millions! 

This is year 'round stuff — boys and girls. And 
speaking of year 'round, do you know that 
there are almost 1600 manufacturers 
in the Miami area. Ask your Hollingbery 
man for Miami Market Facts. 



IP-- 



James M. LcGate, General Manager 

5,000 WATTS • 610 KC • NBC AFFILIATE 

National Rep., George P. Hollingbery Co. 




Page 96 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



FCC Grants Satellite, 
Allows 4 Tv Changes 

THE FCC last week granted The Hills Broad- 
casting Co. a construction permit for a new tv 
station on ch. 3 at Florence, S. D., The station 
will operate as a parttime satellite and will re- 
broadcast some of the programs of KELO- 
TV Sioux Falls. 

KELO-AM-TV is sole owner of the new 
Florence station, which will have an effective 
radiated power of 25.7 kw visual and 15.5 kw 
aural, with antenna height of 710 ft. 
In other FCC tv actions last week: 
WVAA (TV) Petersburg, Va., ch. 8, was 
granted a modification of its construction per- 
mit to change antenna height from 550 ft. to 
940 ft. 

WMGT (TV) Adams, Mass., was granted a 
switch to Pittsfield, Mass., and change from ch. 
74 to ch. 19. ERP is changed from 300 kw 
visual and 155 kw aural to 115 kw visual and 
67.6 kw aural, with antenna height above aver- 
age terrain increasing from 2,060 to 2,120 ft. 

WANE-TV Fort Wayne, Ind.. ch. 69, was 
granted a change in effective radiated power 
and antenna height from 100 kw visual, 50 kw 
aural, 430 ft. to 200 kw visual, 107 kw aural, 
740 ft. 

WLBR-TV Lebanon, Pa., ch. 15, which sus- 
pended operations Oct. 16, 1954, was granted 
a six months extension to complete construction. 

Grants Proposed for Two Ams, 
WDMG Boost Favored 

PROPOSED grants for new am stations in 
Latrobe, Pa., and Hartselle, Ala., were an- 
nounced last week by the FCC. 

At Latrobe, a decision would grant 500 
w daytime operation on 1480 kc to Latrobe 
Broadcasters, subject to the condition that the 
applicant file within 60 days of grant an applica- 
tion for modification of permit specifying a 
site conforming to FCC rules and standards. 

The proposed am grant at Hartselle was to 
Dorsey Eugene Newman for 250 w daytime 
operation on 860 kc. The same initial decision 
would also authorize WDMG Douglas, Ga. to 
increase from 1 kw to 5 kw, operating daytime 
only on 860 kc, and deny the application of 
WERD Atlanta for an increase of power from 
1 kw to 10 kw on 860 kc, daytime only. 

Bill to Amend 309 (c) 
Introduced by Magnuson 

AN FCC-recommended bill to amend Sec. 309 
(c) of the Communications Act — to keep pro- 
tests from delaying television service granted 
without hearing by the FCC in an area — has 
been introduced by Sen. Warren G. Magnuson 
(D-Wash.). 

The bill (S 1648) was referred to the Senate 
Interstate & Foreign Commerce Committee, of 
which Sen. Magnuson is chairman. FCC asked 
the House and Senate to amend the section last 
month [B«T, March 28]. 

Comr. John C. Doerfer, who submitted sep-' 
arate views to the FCC request, asked that the 
whole section be repealed, charging that it de- 
mands an undue amount of FCC time, is used 
primarily by competitors to delay a new station 
and "accomplishes no useful purpose." 

The Magnuson bill would permit the FCC 
to (1) deny a protest without hearing when the 
facts it alleges, even if true, do not warrant 
reversal of a grant; (2) allow the FCC to deny 
a request for stay of a grant if the Commission 
feels a stay is not in the public interest and 



(3) permit the FCC to draw up the issues for 
a hearing, such issues not necessarily to be 
those presented by the protestant. 

The protest section, one of the major pro- 
visions of the McFarland Act of 1952 amending 
the Communications Act, at present requires 
the FCC to hold a hearing within 30 days if 
the protestant establishes that he is a party in 
interest and if he specifies his facts. If the 
FCC sets such a hearing, the effective date of 
a grant must await findings of the hearing. 

Rowlands Get Am Daytimer 

NEW AM station at Fernandina Beach, Fla., 
and improved facilities for three existing sta- 
tions were among the non-hearing radio grants 



announced by FCC last week. 

The new Florida station, 1 kw daytime on 
1570 kc, went to Fernandina Beach Broad- 
casters, owned by Marshall W. and Carol Row- 
land, employes of WJHP Jacksonville, Fla. 

WCHV Charlottesville, Va., was granted 
change from 250 w on 1240 kc to 1 kw on 
1260 kc, directional night. WGBR Goldsboro, 
N. C, won increase in day power from 1 kw 
to 5 kw, continuing on 1150 kc with 1 kw night 
and different directional arrays day and night. 
WPCT Putnam, Conn., was granted increase 
in power from 500 w to 1 kw, continuing day- 
time on 1350 kc. Bid of Mountain State Broad- 
casting Co. for a new station on 1470 kc with 
1 kw daytime at Morgantown, W. Va., was set 
for hearing. WWW Fairmont was made party. 




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Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 97 



CHAIRMAN McCONNAUGHEY AIRS VIEWS 



FCC head, interviewed Satur- 
day on CBS Radio 'Capitol 
Cloakroom/ displays decisive 
stand on many problems of 
broadcast operation and regu- 
lation. 

FCC CHAIRMAN George C. McConnaughey 
disagrees with his colleague, Comr. Frieda 
Hennock, on such topics as program regulation 
and free time for politicians (see stories, 
pages 86, 90), he said Saturday on the CBS 
Radio Capitol Cloakroom (6:30-7 p.m.). 

The chairman stated his views — many of 
them decisive — on tv's impact on juvenile de- 
linquency, Senate and FCC radio-tv probes, 
subscription tv, uhf vs. vhf, color tv, repeater 
stations, the future of network radio and edu- 
cational tv. 

Chairman McConnaughey's comments fol- 
low, in capsule form: 

JUVENILE DELINQUENCY— Many ele- 
ments such as autos, movies, tv, parental disci- 
pline are factors. He did not agree with Comr. 
Hennock's suggestion that licensees should be 
required to. submit crime program lists to FCC, 
with renewal refused if ratio is too high. Pro- 
gram regulation is not an FCC function, he 
said, but its role should be studied. 

FCC RADIO-TV PROBE— Commission has 
1,100 on staff, 700 of them professional people 
who know the business. It should study all 
facets of broadcasting and work in harmony 
with Senate committee, which has own probe. 
Study should include economics, programs and 



iVotc it costs less 
to sell 
MINNEAPOLIS 
ST. PAUL 

Maximum power at minimum cost. 
Ask your H-R representative 
about choice availabilities. 



316,000 
watts on 
Channel 9 




possibility of monopoly. Flatly opposed rate 
regulation since broadcasting is not a public 
utility or monopoly. Probe necessary because 
last one was 1938-41. Meantime tv has arrived 
and 99% of people have radio. 

TV COVERAGE— Now 425 stations on air; 
99% of people can get one tv signal, 70-75% 
at least two. FCC has done "perfectly remark- 
able" job in three years and should clean up 
200 pending applications by end of 1955. 

VHF VS. UHF— Sees great hope uhf can 
be put on economic basis, and said manufac- 
turers should make all-channel sets. Said num- 
ber of military vhf channels is secret and de- 
clined to answer question on proposal to give 
all uhf band to broadcasters and vhf to military. 
In "fantastic expansion" of tv industry many 
uhf stations are not on good economic status, 
he said, but vhf stations had trouble in early 
days. 

SUBSCRIPTION TV— Commission studying 
it in rule-making proceedings. It is "a radical 
departure" from free broadcasting and is "very 
intriguing." Conceded FCC may face serious 
bootlegging problem. 

COLOR — It's brand new but estimates for 
end of 1955 range from 100,000 to 300,000 sets. 
Color is on the way; price of color sets may go 
down fast in next 12 months. He advised 
people to buy tv sets as they need them, not 
waiting for color which he figures will be on 
"fruition basis" in three or four years. 

REPEATER STATIONS— Believes they are 
coming. 

NETWORK RADIO— Having gone through 
its growth, network radio has settled into a 
stable industry. Radio has only scratched the 
surface. One poll showed young people often 
prefer radio to tv. 

POLITICIANS— Should pay for time "the 
same as anybody else." 

EDUCATIONAL TV— Granted 242 chan- 
nels in 1952 with nine vhf and two uhf stations 
on the air. Educational tv has "tremendous 
possibilities" but is slow developing — "they 
can't go out and make money." FCC should be 
sympathetic with educational tv. 

White, FCC Bureau Chief, 
Announces July Retirement 

COL. EDWIN L. WHITE, chief of the FCC's 
Safety & Special Radio Services Bureau, plans 
to retire at the end of July, he announced last 
week. Col. White joined the FCC's predecessor 
agency, the Federal Radio Commission, in 1930. 

Burns Named General Counsel 
Of Senate Anti-Monopoly Unit 

JOSEPH W. BURNS, member of the New 
York and Washington law firm of Fulton, 
Walter & Halley, was named last week as 
general counsel and staff director of the Senate 
Anti-monopoly Subcommittee by its chairman, 
Sen. Harley M. Kilgore (D-W. Va.). 

Mr. Burns' appointment to the subcommittee 
has been expected for some time [Closed Cir- 
cuit, Jan. 24]. He has specialized in the tax 
and antitrust fields, both in private practice and 
during 11 years in government service, includ- 
ing 1943-45 as special assistant to the Attorney 
General. 

Sen. Kilgore, who said the subcommittee will 
get underway "very shortly on a full-scale 
antitrust and monopoly probe," earlier had in- 
dicated he would look into "monopoly prac- 
tices" in the communications field, but later he 




ADM. HOOPER 



apparently reached an agreement with Chair- 
man Warren G. Magnuson (D-Wash.) of the 
Senate Commerce Committee wherein the 
latter group would turn over to the Kilgore 
group all instances of monopoly found in the 
Commerce Committee's current investigation 
of networks and uhf-vhf troubles. 

Rear Adm. S. C. Hooper Dies; 
Pioneer Scientist in Radio 

REAR ADM. Stanford C. Hooper, 70, retired, 
pioneer radio scientist, died Wednesday at his 
Miami Beach, Fla., home. Funeral services 
were to be held today (Monday) at Ft. Myer, 
Va., chapel with bur- 
ial in Arlington Na- 
tional Cemetery. 

Adm. Hooper was 
born in Colton, 
Calif., in 1884 and 
was graduated from 
Annapolis in 1905. 
After five years of 
sea duty he became 
an instructor at An- 
napolis, keeping in 
touch with his pio- 
neering work with 
"wireless" by work- 
ing weekends at the 
Bureau of Standards. He was appointed fleet 
radio officer in 1912 and in 1915 became head 
of the Radio Division, Bureau of Ships. He 
commanded a destroyer for a time and returned 
to the Radio Division in 1918. 

When the Federal Radio Commission was 
formed as a temporary agency in 1927, the then 
Capt. Hooper was loaned by the Navy as its 
first chief engineer. 

During a cruise to Australia after returning 
to the fleet as radio officer he carried out pio- 
neering experiments with high-frequency equip- 
ment. In 1928 he was director of naval com- 
munications and in 1934 moved to chairman- 
ship of the Naval Research Committee and 
director of the Technical Division, Naval Op- 
erations. After returning he was awarded the 
Elliott Crosson Gold Medal for pioneering 
radio leadership and discovery. Since his re- 
tirement he has been a consultant to several 
electronic manufacturers. 

Three Stations Face FCC 
On Racing Tip Charges 

RUMBLINGS some weeks ago that FCC is con- 
cerned about radio stations allowing use of 
their facilities to advertise tips on horse races 
[Closed Circuit, Feb. 7] came into the open 
last week as the Commission sent pre-hearing 
McFarland letters to three Miami area sta- 
tions. Involved are WFEC Miami and WMBM 
and WAHR Miami Beach. 

WFEC and WMBM seek license renewal 
while WAHR has pending an application to 
cover its construction permit. FCC indicated 
hearings appear necessary. 

Pointing out that the Commission "has be- 
fore it information that you have permitted 
persons engaged in selling tips on horse races 
... to use your station facilities," FCC wrote 
the stations that "there is indication that the 
operations" of certain named individuals "are 
conducted in a highly questionable manner in 
that false and misleading representations are 
made as to the service rendered." 

FCC named a "Jimmy Grant" in its letter to 
WAHR, a "Johnny Kenny" with respect to 
WFEC and an "Al Laurence" on WMBM. 



Offices, Studios, Transmitter 

FOSHAY TOWER 

Minneapolis 

Represented Nationally by H-R TELEVISION, INC. 



Page 98 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



N. Y. LIBEL BILL 
AWAITS GOV.'S NOD 

THE BROADCASTERS of New York State 
last week were within a step of having a state 
law to relieve them of liability for defamatory 
remarks that may be made in broadcasts by 
qualified political candidates. The final pro- 
tective step is expected to come within the 
next few weeks. 

The pending bill affording stations this im- 
munity against libel suits arising out of non- 
censorable political broadcast cleared its last 
legislative hurdle, after some delay, with pass- 
age by the New York State Senate on March 
29 by a vote of 53-2. It already had passed the 
assembly by a 140-0 vote a month earlier and 
now awaits signature by Gov. Averell Harri- 
man, who has been in Florida but was expected 
to sign shortly after his return. Under state law, 
he has 30 days from the date of final passage. 

The bill, which had the backing of the newly- 
formed New York State Assn. of Radio & 
Television Broadcasters as its first major proj- 
ect, frees station operators and their employes 
from liability for any defamatory statement by 
any legally qualified political candidate whose 
broadcast remarks may not, under FCC rules, 
be censored by the station. One thing would be 
required of the stations: before and after each 
political brodcast they would have to carry an 
announcement saying the speech is not censor- 
able under FCC regulations and that the re- 
marks do not reflect the views of the station, 
its owership or its management. 

The NYSARTB has urged adoption of such 
a bill since its formation in January under the 
presidency of Michael R. Hanna, WHCU 
Ithaca. John Titus, Albany attorney, is associa- 
tion counsel and was legislative observer. 

Hoover Report Curbs 
Some FCC Functions 

THE FCC is among government agencies which 
would be affected by recommendations released 
by the Hoover Commission yesterday (Sunday) 
embracing a broad plan to separate the ad- 
ministrative and judicial functions of federal 
agencies by establishment of an Administrative 
Court. 

The report, on Legal Services and Procedure, 
among other things, recommends: 

1. Transfer to existing courts of certain 
judicial functions of government agencies "such 
as the imposition, remission or compromise of 
money penalties, awarding of reparations or 
damages, and issuance of injunctive orders, 
wherever this can be accomplished 'without 
harm to the regulatory process'." 

2. Development of a legal career service for 
civilian attorneys in government, with an office 
in the Justice Dept. to administer it. 

3. Integration of the legal staffs of each de- 
partment, agency or regulatory body under an 
assistant secretary or a general counsel. 

4. "Precise and complete" definition in en- 
abling legislation of authority delegated by 
Congress to federal administrative agencies. 

5. Proposed advance hearings for parties 
affected or to be affected by changes in rules, 
in licenses or revocation of licenses, injunctive 
or regulatory orders and review of decisions 
on tests, examinations and inspections. 

6. Embracement by the Administrative Court 
of the injunctive and adjudicative phases of 
trade regulation now vested in the FCC and 
other agencies. 

7. Change of hearing examiners into hearing 
commissioners under a chief examiner ap- 
pointed by the President, with Senate consent, 



for a 12-year term. He would be guided by a 
five-member presidentially-appointed advisory 
committee representing the judiciary, interested 
agencies and attorneys of administrative law. 

WTCN-AM-TV Sale Approved 
To Bitner for $1.7 Million 

TRANSFER of control of WTCN-AM-TV 
Minneapolis from Robert Butler and associates 
to Harry M. Bitner's Consolidated Television 
& Radio Broadcasters Inc. was granted by the 
FCC last week, first part of a double purchase 
whereby the Bitner group also acquires WMIN- 
TV St. Paul from N. L. Bentson and associates. 
Combined price is $3 million [B*T, Jan. 31]. 

WTCN-TV and WMIN-TV share time on 
ch. 11, but under Bitner ownership WMIN-TV 
will be dropped, as the FCC also approved full- 
time operation for WTCN-TV. Purchase of 
WMIN-TV did not require Commission con- 
sent. Mr. Bentson earlier sold WMIN-AM-FM 
to W. F. Johns interests. 

Consolidated is licensee of WFBM-AM-TV 
Indianapolis and WEOA Evansville, Ind., and 
parent company of WOOD-AM-TV Grand 
Rapids and WFDF Flint, Mich. Harry M. Bit- 
ner Sr. is chairman of the board and Harry 
M. Bitner Jr. is president. Total purchase 
price of $3 million included $1.7 million plus 
for WTCN-AM-TV, FCC indicated, and $1.2 
million plus for WMIN-TV. 

Other sales and transfers of control granted 
last week were: 

KORK Las Vegas, Nev., granted assignment 
of license from Reno Broadcasting Co. to 
Southwestern Broadcasting Co. for $60,000. 
Southwestern is solely owned by Donald W. 
Reynolds, principal stockholder in KLRJ-TV 
Henderson, Nev.; KZTV (TV) Reno, Nev.; 
KFSA-AM-FM-TV Fort Smith, Ark.; KHRG 
Okmulgee, Okla, and KBRS Springdale, Ark. 

KOLO Reno, Nev., was granted assignment 
of license from Reno Broadcasting Co. to West- 
ern Broadcasting Co. for $190,000. Western 
is solely owned by Donald W. Reynolds (see 
above). 

WFUL-AM-FM Fulton, Ky., granted trans- 
fer of control from R. W. Bushart and asso- 
ciates to Warren L. Moxley for $35,500, for 
88.75% interest. Mr. Moxley is a former thea- 
tre operator. 

Commonwealth Broadcasting Corp. (WLOW 
Portsmouth, Va.) granted relinquishment of 
positive control by E. L. Scott, Robert Was- 
don and Jack Siegel through issuance of stock 
to Harold Kaye and Emil J. Arnold. Consid- 
eration is $35,000 for 50% interest. Mr. Kaye 
is vice president-25% owner of WORC Wor- 
cester, Mass. Mr. Arnold is in real estate and 
investments. 

WDZ Decatur, 111., granted transfer of con- 
trol from Charles C. Caley, and Horace L. 
Lohnes to Mr. Caley, Frank C. Schroeder Jr., 
Meredith M. Daubin, Raymond B. Harding, 
Thomas L. Schroyer and the Munsey Trust Co., 
Washington, executors of the estate of Mr. 
Lohnes, deceased. 

FTC Orders More Hearings 
On Chesterfield Ad Claims 

THE FEDERAL Trade Commission last week 
ordered further hearings to determine if cer- 
tain advertising claims of Liggett & Myers To- 
bacco Co. (Chesterfields), New York, are mis- 
leading or are mere "puffing." At the same 
time the FTC dismissed a 13-year-old false 
advertising charge against Philip Morris & Co. 

Up for additional hearings are claims that 
Chesterfields are (1) "milder," (2) "soothing and 
relaxing" and (3) leave no "unpleasant after- 
taste." The action by the commission reverses 




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WKYW 


Worcester, Mass. 


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Milwaukee 


WMIL 







Canada 

Calgary, Alberta, Canada 
New Westminister, B.C. 



CKXL 
CKNW 




Membershi p 
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RADIO GROUP 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 99 



- STATIONS 

STORER '54 NET IS 10 TIMES '45 FIGURE 



GOVERNMENT ; 

a hearing examiner's decision of last July that 
would have dismissed the complaint. The ex- 
aminer ruled that the statements are laudatory, 
harmless or mere "puffing." 

Liggett & Myers in 1954 spent $2,921,452 
in network radio and $6,131,819 in network 
television, according to compilations of Pub- 
lishers Information Bureau. 

In the Philip Morris case, the commission 
dropped a complaint, first issued in August 
1942, that claimed the firm's cigarettes are 
less irritating to the throat than other leading 
brands. The FTC upheld an examiner's de- 
cision which stated the formula allegedly sup- 
porting the advertising claims had been dis- 
continued as well as the advertising itself. 
Philip Morris also has abandoned the adver- 
tising claim that its cigarettes do not leave an 
after-taste, the FTC said. 

Figures from PIB show that Philip Morris 
spent $1,126,951 in network radio and $3,668,- 
559 in network television in 1954. 

Tarzian Says 5-Mile Limit 
Would Harm Tv Reception 

CONTENDING FCC's proposal to limit tele- 
vision transmitter-tower sites to areas within 
five miles of the principal city is in error, tv 
tuner-maker Sarkes Tarzian last week told the 
Commission that the greater signal strength will 
harm tv reception rather than improve it. 

FCC's proposal seeks to tighten up allocation 
principles and prevent stations from wandering 
away to other cities instead of giving first at- 
tention to the communities where they were 
assigned [B«T, March 7]. Comments are due 
April 15. 

Mr. Tarzian, who also operates ch. 4 WTTV 
(TV) Bloomington, Ind., contended it is in the 
public interest to have the high power-high 
tower tv outlets located more than five miles 
from concentrated centers of population and 
should be "at least 15 to 20 miles." At the 
greater distance, he said, "the public would 
receive much better tv service and much of the 
ghost and all of the blanketing effect would be 
eliminated." 

He asserted that today's low price tv sets 
"overload" when subjected to high intensity 
signals and "the response curve of the radio- 
frequency and intermediate-frequency system 
becomes very poor when the amplifier tubes are 
operated at high bias conditions." 



Prospectus sent to stockholders 
by Storer Broadcasting Co. 
shows last year's net profits 
were $3.6 million as against 
only $306 thousand in 1945. 
Its seven tv's gross 10 times its 
seven am's. 

NET PROFIT of Storer Broadcasting Co. last 
year was $3,680,779, more than 10 times 
greater than 1945, when its net profit was 
$306,930. 

During 1954, Storer grossed from its seven 
tv stations more than 10 times the revenue 
it realized from its radio holdings. 

These figures are contained in a prospectus 
sent to Storer stockholders, announcing an is- 
sue of 262,750 shares of common stock which 
last Wednesday were advertised and over-sub- 
scribed in the one day. First offering was to 
stockholders with the remainder of the stock 
offered to the public. Price was at the prevail- 
ing market of 24%. 

In its prospectus, SBC said that it would ap- 
ply $4,590,000 of the proceeds of the stock 
sale toward a reduction of a bank loan of $11.5 
million made last July. The remainder together 
with other funds will be applied to preferred 
stock redemption. It was noted that the sum- 
mary of Storer Broadcasting earnings did not 
include those of Miami Beach Sun Publishing 
Co., a wholly-owned subsidiary, although pro- 
vision was made of the losses incurred by the 
publishing company, less profits, since its ac- 
quisition in 1949. 

According to this table of earnings, SBC 
showed a net profit of $2,186,415 in 1953; $1,- 
594,956 in 1952; $1,464,776 in 1951; $926,475 
in 1950; $539,620 in 1949; $478,808 in 1948; 
$514,721 in 1947; $740,581 in 1946. 

Gross revenues from its seven tv stations 
amounted to $13,391,027 in 1954 compared with 
more than $10 million in 1953; more than $6.5 
million in 1952; nearly $5 million in 1951; more 
than $2 million in 1950; $577,011 in 1949; 
$31,539 in 1948, and no revenue in 1947. 

Radio revenues, although outstripped by tv 
as early as 1952, were about level in the 8 years 
reported. Last year, radio revenues grossed 
Storer $4,345,504, about $300,000 less than in 
1953. In 1947, gross radio revenue was $3,748,- 
337. Peak Storer year in radio gross revenue 
was in 1951, when it hit $4,743,596. 

Storer tv stations are WAGA-TV Atlanta, 
WBRC-TV Birmingham (Ala.), WJBK-TV De- 



troit, WXEL (TV) Cleveland, WSPD-TV To- 
ledo, KPTV (TV) Portland, Ore., and WGBS- 
TV Miami, Fla. Radio stations owned by Storer 
are WAGA Atlanta, WBRC Birmingham, 
WGBS Miami, WJBK Detroit, WJW Cleveland, 
WSPD Toledo and WWVA Wheeling, W. Va. 

In a breakdown of remuneration last year 
of the company's officers and directors, the re- 
port showed George B. Storer, director and 
president, with $75,175 in aggregate. Next 
highest was Lee B. Wailes, director and execu- 
tive vice president, with $60,164, who was fol- 
lowed by Stanton P. Kettler, director and district 
vice president for the southern district, $51,292; 
William E. Rine, director and district vice 
president for the northern district, $42,020. 
J. Harold Ryan, director and senior vice presi- 
dent, also was listed among those executives 
receiving $25,000 per year or more, with a 
total of $33,750 received last year. 

Under Storer Broadcasting's employe profit- 
sharing plan, Mr. Storer had an aggregate 
amount set aside or accrued of $34,370, of 
which $11,062 was reported in 1954; Mr. Wailes, 
$25,350, of which $8,670 was last year; Mr. 
Kettler, $19,873, $7,488 last year, and Mr. Rine, 
$17,802, with $6,249 last year. 

In a breakdown of tv gross revenue, the 
company reported that last year 28.4% of time 
sales was network; 43.2%, national spots, and 
28.4%, local. In radio, the figures were 11.8%, 
network; 38.1%, national spots, and 50.1%, 
local. 

Among the appraisals of the broadcast media 
made in the prospectus: 

• Daytime rates for standard broadcasting 
have "stabilized" but because of tv's competition, 
which is stronger at night than during the day, 
"nighttime standard broadcasting rates may de- 
crease further." 

• Fm broadcasting at present is not profitable. 
No income is derived from sale of fm time 
and there is nothing in sight to indicate that the 
medium will become "income producing." Storer 
Broadcasting will continue fm operation because 

(1) it is no "material financial burden" and 

(2) should fm become a major factor in the 
industry, Storer stations will be prepared. 

• SBC does not believe its Miami uhf prop- 
erty (WGBS-TV) "has achieved a satisfactory 
competitive position" because uhf set conversion 
in the area has not reached the percentage de- 
sired, while the other station in the market, a 
vhf, can be received "substantially by all of the 
television sets." 

The prospectus noted that the company could 
not estimate the probability of "being able to 
attain a satisfactory degree of uhf conversion 
in the Miami market." Miami estimate was 
148,000 sets. Storer's other uhf station is in 
Portland, Ore., for which it estimated 204,798 
sets converted. 

In the prospectus, SBC referred to itself as 
the "largest independent television and standard 
radio broadcasting owner and operator in the 
United States" and as the only owner of seven 
tv stations and seven radio stations. 

Another breakdown indicated that in radio, 
SBC follows a policy of 25% sustaining time 
and 75% commercial. In tv, the ratio was 20% 
sustaining, 80% commercial. 

Also detailed in the prospectus is the ar- 
rangement of Storer with the Katz Agency and 
NBC Spot Sales. The agreement with the Katz I 
Agency, which represents Storer's tv stations, 
is on a continuing basis, it was explained, but 
is subject to cancellation at any time by either i 
party upon one year's written notice. Should ! 
Storer wish to set up its own national sales rep- 
resentative department, however, it can upon 90 !' 
days' notice withdraw one or more of the sta- 



SELLING ... the Nation's 20th Family Income Market 




ONE 



RONALD B. WOODYARD, PRESIDENT AND GENERAL MANAGER 

DAYTON, O 



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'THE CITY BEAUTIFUL" 



Page 100 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



Tragedy Averted 

MAYOR Harry D. Breighner, of Clinton, 
111., has cited WHOW Clinton for "pub- 
lic service beyond the call of duty" in a 
letter to NARTB President Harold E. 
Fellows. The tribute was based on a 
service station error that might have led 
to tragedy. A Clinton attendant mis- 
takenly gave a jug of gasoline to a cus- 
tomer who ordered kerosene the night of 
March 4. After he discovered his mistake 
he notified WHOW which went on the air 
with a warning to the unidentified pur- 
chaser. The message was repeated every 
30 minutes. The whole area was anxious 
lest the buyer dump gasoline into a hot 
stove. The WHOW announcement was 
heard by the buyer, whose youngsters 
had turned on Uncle Jim's Kid Show. 



tions from Katz representation. 

The agreement with NBC Spot Sales expires 
Oct. 31, 1955, it was explained, but may be 
terminated upon 120 days notice or in the event 
of termination of the network affiliation. 

In the prospectus, Storer noted that it intends 
to apply for listing on the New York Stock Ex- 
change of all of its outstanding common stock. 

WABC'S RENAULT 
NAMED GEN. MGR. 

APPOINTMENT of Michael A. Renault as 
general manager of WABC New York, ABC's 
key station, was announced last week by 
Robert E. Kintner, president of the network. 
Mr. Renault has 



been acting general 
manager since No- 
vember 1954. 

Mr. Renault join- 
ed the station (then 
WJZ) in December 
1950 as an account 
executive. Two years 
later he was named 
commercial man- 
ager, the position he 
held until he was ap- 
pointed acting gen- 




eral manager. MR. RENAULT 

Before joining 
WABC, he was with spot representative firms 
including Donald Cooke Inc., where he was 
New York office manager, and Headley-Reed 
Co., where he was an account executive. 

Mr. Renault served with the U. S. Army for 
five years during World War II. His appoint- 
ment as general manager of WABC is effective 
immediately, Mr. Kintner said. 

$3 Million Credit Pact Set 
Between Bitner, Mellon Bank 

A $3 million credit agreement has been ar- 
ranged by the Bitner-controlled Consolidated 
Television & Radio Broadcasters Inc. with the 
Mellon National Bank & Trust Co., Pittsburgh. 
The agreement carries a 4Vi% interest charge 
and was established for the $3.35 million pur- 
chase of Minneapolis-St. Paul sharetime ch. 11 
stations WTCN-TV and WMIN-TV, and 
WTCN [B»T, Ian. 31]. 

Consolidated, which was formed into a pub- 
lic corporation last year, owns WFBM-AM- 
TV Indianapolis, WOOD-AM-TV Grand Rap- 
ids and WFDF Flint, both Mich., and WEOA 
Evansville (Ind.). The latter two stations are 
fighting FCC decisions granting tv channels in 
those cities to other applicants. 

The $3 million credit agreement is the sec- 
ond Consolidated has with the Mellon bank. 
I It already has a $750,000 bank credit with that 
bank, running to luly 31, 1955. 

The Minneapolis-St. Paul purchase is still 
pending FCC approval. 

I Shaw Joins Headley-Reed 

I WILLIAM H. SHAW, formerly general man- 
I ager of KHMO Hannibal, Mo., has joined the 
Chicago staff of Headley-Reed Co., station rep- 
' resentative firm, as account executive. Mr. 
I Shaw, who resigned his KHMO post April 1, 
| will concentrate on radio in Chicago and radio- 
I tv elsewhere in his territory. He joined KHMO 
! in August 1953 after serving as midwest ad- 
vertising representative and, later, midwest sales 
manager of B*T for two and a half years. 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



WBRZ (TV) Goes on Air; 
4 Tvs State Progress 

WBRZ (TV) Baton Rouge, La., on test patterns 
since March 31, is slated to make its commer- 
cial debut Thursday. The ch. 2 station, affili- 
ated with NBC and ABC, is the second tv 
outlet there. 

RCA equipment will be used, including a 
12-bay, 232-ft. antenna which will stand 1,001 
feet above sea level when mounted on a 
triangular steel tower. The antenna, the station 
reports, is the largest of its type. WBRZ is 
represented by George P. Hollingbery Co. 

Construction progress has been reported by 
four more new tv stations: 

KFDM-TV Beaumont, Tex., which expects 
to begin regular programming April 24, went 
on regular test patterns April 1. The ch. 6 
station will be affiliated with CBS and repre- 
sented by Free & Peters Inc. 

KRNT-TV Des Moines (ch. 8), owned by 
Cowles Broadcasting Co., expects to begin 
operation by Aug. 1, Robert Dillon, general 
manager, has announced. Remodeling has 
started on the KRNT Theatre Bldg. The tv 
operation will be located on the first two floors, 
the radio operation on the third. 

KTBS-TV Shreveport, La., on ch. 3, has set 
Sept. 3 as starting date. It will be the second 
tv outlet there. E. Newton Wray, president, 
has estimated the station, the second tv outlet 
there, will cost about $750,000. The planned 
tower will measure 1,150 ft. 

W1TN (TV). Washington, N. C, the first 
video outlet there, expects to be on the air in 
September affiliated with NBC. The ch. 7 



station has asked the FCC for permission to 
operate at maximum 316 kw. Tower height will 
be 949 ft. above sea level and General Electric 
equipment will be used throughout. The sta- 
tion estimates that it will serve more than one 
million people. W. R. Roberson Ir. is president. 

Suttlemyre General Manager 
Under New KOPP Ownership 

STAFF appointments at KOPP Ogden, Utah, 
have been announced by Milton Scott, president 
of M. B. Scott Inc., new owner of the station. 
Larry Suttlemyre continues as general manager. 
Larry Buskett, former commercial manager of 




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• STATIONS' 



KLAC Los Angeles and co-owner-vice president 
of Clubtime Productions Inc. (syndicated tran- 
scriptions), has been retained as management 
and program consultant. 

N. Pratt Smith, who has been in freelance 
show syndication, has been appointed commer- 
cial manager. Dave Page, with KOPP for 
about one year and before that program direc- 
tor at KMUR Murray, Utah, has been named 
assistant manager and head of the program 
department. Dick Kingston has been named 
chief engineer and a member of the disc m.c. 
staff, which also includes Dave Page, Bob Rudd 
and Bud Trewett. Other members of the 
KOPP staff are Mary Ketts, James Nixon, Clif- 
ford Pomeroy, Max Whittington, Don Steffey 
and Garth Wheeler. 

COTT CONSIDERED 
AS WABD (TV) HEAD 

TED COTT, former vice president and oper- 
ating head of NBC's radio network, was re- 
ported last week to be high in the running for 
the post of heading DuMont Television Net- 
work's WABD (TV) New York. 

Dr. Allen B. DuMont, president of Allen B. 
DuMont Labs, the broadcasting unit's parent 
organization, told B«T that Mr. Cott was one 
among others under consideration. The others 
were not identified. 

Dr. DuMont indicated it might be either days 
or months before a decision is announced. 

The future assignment of George L. Baren- 
Bregge, who was brought in from being sales 
manager of WDTV (TV) Pittsburgh to manage 
WABD some months before WDTV was sold 
by DuMont to Westinghouse Broadcasting Co., 
apparently has not been determined. 

Mr. Cott resigned from NBC as of March 
1 [B«T, Feb. 28]. He joined NBC in April 
1950 as general manager of the network's 
WNBC-AM-FM and WNBT (TV) New York 
(Now WRCA-AM-FM-TV). He formerly was 
vice president in charge of programming for 
WNEW New York, independent station. 

McCormick Will Names Five 
To Head Tribune/ Stations 

FIVE TRUSTEES, including Chesser M. Camp- 
bell, former director of MBS, have been named 
in the will of the late Col. Robert R. McCor- 
mick to operate the Chicago Tribune's numerous 
subsidiaries, including WGN-AM-TV Chicago 
and WPIX (TV) New York. 

Mr. Campbell, who served as a director for 
Mutual from 1944 to 1949, was elected presi- 
dent of the Tribune Co., holding organization 
for the Tribune, New York Daily News and 13 
subsidiary companies in the U. S. and Canada. 
He was a director and later vice president of 
the Newspaper Advertising Executives Assn. 
and is a board member of the American News- 
paper Publishers Assn. He previously was active 
on the board of the Bureau of Advertising. 

Other trustees who will control McCormick 
radio-tv and other operations are J. Howard 
Wood, treasurer of the Tribune Co. and busi- 
ness manager, Chicago Tribune; William D. 
Maxwell, Tribune managing editor; Arthur 
Schmon, president of Tribune Co. paper mills 
and other Canadian subsidiaries, and Mrs. Gar- 
vin (Bazy) Tankersley, Col. McCormick's 
niece and former editor of the Washington 
Times-Herald which was purchased by the 
Washington Post. All are executors of the Mc- 
Cormick-Patterson trust. 



Herald of Spring 

A NOVEL way to welcome spring was 
found by WRRR Rockford, 111., when 
it offered $5 to the first young lady who 
would step up to its outside microphone 
in a bathing suit and take a short stroll 
through the downtown area with the 
station's m.c. Every 30 minutes, begin- 
ning at 12 noon on March 21, the $5 
prize was increased. Self-restraint had its 
reward for Miss Eva Harris who waited 
until 2:17 p.m. to appear in a strapless 
bathing suit. By then the award money 
had been raised to $15. Miss Harris, 
amid 40 degree temperature, was dubbed 
"Miss Springtime." 



WJR Directors, Officers 
Re-elected by Stockholders 

WJR Detroit stockholders re-elected the in- 
cumbent directors and corporate officers for 
another year term, John F. Patt, director and 
corporation president, revealed last week. 

Directors re-elected were: Mrs. Frances S. 
Parker; Mr. Patt; Worth Kramer; William G. 
Siebert; Selden S. Dickinson; F. Sibley Moore, 
and G. F. Leydorf. 

Corporation officers named were: Mr. Patt; 
Mr. Kramer, vice president and general man- 
ager; Mr. Siebert, secretary and treasurer, and ji 
Mr. Moore and George W. Cushing, vice presi- 
dents. 

In his report to the stockholders Mr. Patt 
said that WJR received 45% of the total volume 
of radio advertising in the Detroit area and that 
$3 million sales were recorded by the station 
last year. 

Mr. Patt also stated that if an FCC trans- 
mitter site grant is made in the near future he 
hopes to inaugurate WJRT (TV) Flint, Mich., 
operations by late summer. 

Empire Coil Gen. Mgr. Named 

APPOINTMENT of R. F. Willett as general 
manager of Empire 
Coil Co., New Ro- 
chelle, N. Y., has 
been announced by 
George B. Storer Jr., 
vice president of 
Storer Broadcasting 
Co., parent firm of 
Empire Coil. Mr. 
Willett began his en- 
gineering career in 
1937 with General 
Electric Co., Sche- 
n e c t a d y , N. Y., 
where he served un- 
til 1942. After leav- 
ing GE, he was active in the electronics manu- 
facturing field in sales and application engi- 
neering, advertising and management, and for 
five years was sales and application engineer 
with the F. W. Sickles Co. For the last three 
years he has been plant manager at Essex 
Electronics.' 

REPRESENTATIVE APPOINTMENTS 

WNDU-TV South Bend, Ind., has appointed 
Meeker Tv Inc., N. Y. 

KTHT Houston, Tex., has appointed Paul H. 
Raymer Co., N. Y. 

KAKE Wichita, Kan., has appointed Joseph 
Hershey McGillvra Inc., N. Y. 




MR. WILLETT 



Page 102 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



r SU PER POWER 

on the , i 

LGULF COASljJ 



Erie Newspapers Battle 
Over Financial Slurs 

CROSS LIBEL suits have been filed in Erie, 
Pa., involving competing newspapers and tv 
stations in that city. 

Involved are the Erie Dispatch (WICU [TV]) 
and the Erie Times (WSEE [TV]). 

The Dispatch suit claimed that the Times 
committed libel when it printed a story imply- 
ing that the Dispatch was losing money, accord- 
ing to J. Howard McGrath, former U. S. At- 
torney General. Mr. McGrath represents Ed- 
ward Lamb, owner of the newspaper and tv 
station. 

The Times suit claimed that the Dispatch 
implied in three instances that WSEE was going 
to cease broadcasting because of financial dif- 
ficulties, according to John W. English, attorney 
and stockholder of the tv station. 

WICU operates on ch. 12; WSEE on ch. 35. 

Charles E. Denny, WSEE general manager, 
said: "There is absolutely no truth to their 
[Dispatch] published rumors in regard to WSEE. 
The station is in a healthy condition financially 
and we are going on with our planning for the 
future. We now have an audience of 61,670 
plus and it is growing daily. . . ." 

Bills of particulars are due to be filed later. 

WRC-AM-TV Time Sales Gain 

NET TIME SALES for the first quarter of 1955 
of WRC-AM-TV Washington were 38.3% 
higher than the same 1954 period, Carleton 
D. Smith, vice president and general manager 
of the NBC-owned stations, announced last 
week. 

First-quarter sales of WRC-TV were 32.3% 
higher than the 1954 period, Mr. Smith said, 
and the best first quarter in the history of the 
station. WRC sales in the first three months of 
1955 were 6% higher than the same 1954 
quarter, Mr. Smith declared. He said WRC 
total net sales were higher than any first quar- 
ter in the past five years. 



KVOR Being Sold 



KVOR Colorado Springs, Colo., is being sold 
by James D. Russell to John S. Riggs and F. 
Robert Greene for $120,000, it was announced 
Wednesday. 

Mr. Russell, retains KKTV (TV) in Colorado 
Springs. 

Mr. Riggs has station interests in Elmira, N. 
Y., and WAIR Winston-Salem, N. C, and Mr. 
Greene, Lake View, N. Y., is a Buffalo, N. Y., 
advertising agency man. 

The sale, made through Allen Kander, sta- 
tion broker, is subject to FCC approval. 

STATION PEOPLE 

James A. Felix appointed station manager, 
WFIL-FM Philadelphia. 

George R. Townsend, chief engineer, WWLP 
(TV) Springfield, Mass., elected vice president; 
Howard S. Keefe, promotion manager, named 
assistant station manager; Roland L. Filiault, 
accounting dept., promoted to assistant treas- 
urer; Wallace Sawyer, newsreel cameraman and 
director of local news telecasts, appointed film 
director and buyer; Wallace I. Green, produc- 
tion staff, named program director. 

Dell Cummings, salesman, WCNT Centralia, 
111., appointed commercial manager. 

George K. Eubanks, formerly general manager, 



WDXE Lawrenceburg, Tenn., appointed com- 
mercial manager, WETZ New Martinsville, 
W. Va.; Harold Showman named WETZ pro- 
gram director; Richard McBride appointed chief 
engineer; Elinor Potts named office manager. 

Frank Benesh, news director, WNEM-TV Bay 
City, Mich., appointed program director; Robert 
Beurket appointed chief engineer; Ed Dillon 
named assistant chief engineer; Ken Lawrence, 
program personality, appointed chief announ- 
cer; Tom Matthews named film director; Clint 
Stroebel named continuity director; Ken Sanders 
appointed production director. 




MR. BEURKET 



Evans Meier, operations director, WJAG Nor- 
folk, Neb., appointed assistant manager; Glen 
Hixson, program director, named operations 
director; Don Broadstone, announcer, promoted 
to chief announcer; Earl Katz, announcer, 
named promotion director; Jim Deitloff, an- 
nouncer, appointed farm service director. 

Don Hopkins, chief announcer, WIBW Topeka, 
Kan., appointed assistant manager-program di- 
rector, KNUJ New Ulm, Minn. 

Gerhard Joseph, comptroller, WTTM Trenton, 
N. J, appointed assistant manager. 

Jimmy Denton, formerly with KIMN Denver, 
appointed program director, KLIR there. 

R. B. Taber, former general manager, WCRL 
Oneonta, Ala., appointed account executive, 
WAVU Albertville, Ala., succeeding Glenn 
Jackson, who joined Air Force. 

Warren Earl, promotion and publicity director, 
KCOP (TV) Hollywood, named to head new 
promotion and advertising department. Tierney- 
Ross publicity agency, same city, assuming all 
publicity duties. 

Louis B. Switzer, director, public information 
and fund campaign depts., Syracuse and Onon- 
daga County chapter, American Red Cross, 
appointed promotion director, WSYR-AM-FM- 
TV Syracuse. 



Wesley Lambert, 




MR. LAMBERT 



operations coordinator, 
K A C Y (TV) St. 
Louis, named pro- 
gram director, 
WKNX - TV Sagi- 
naw, Mich. 

Jeff Waugh, WDVA 
Danville, Va., ap- 
pointed promotion 
director; Nadine 
Wright named con- 
tinuity chief; Nancy 
Brown returns to 
station as assistant 
in continuity depart- 
ment. 



George D. Borden, studio supervisor, WPTZ 
(TV) Philadelphia, appointed chief engineer, 
succeeding Raymond J. Bowley; Karl Weger 

succeeds Mr. Borden. 



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Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 103 




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DUMONT 'ELECTRONICAM' 
MAY BE SHOWN THURSDAY 

THE "ELECTRONICAM"— Allen B. DuMont 
Labs' combined live-film camera — probably will 
be publicly demonstrated Thursday afternoon 
in DuMont's Manhattan Telecentre, according 
to Allen B. DuMont, president of the firm. 

In answer to a B*T query, Dr. DuMont 
acknowledged that the demonstration will take 
place this week, marking the first appearance of 
the camera since disclosure of the development 
some months ago [B*T, Jan. 3]. 

The new live-film system is designed to pro- 
vide high-quality film at a low cost. Speculation 
has centered on the possibility of the company, 
which is the parent of the DuMont Television 
Network, entering both distribution and syndi- 
cation of film. In addition, the network is ex- 
pected to revitalize its national operations via 
the live-film technique. 

DuMont officials, however, declined last week 
to comment on these reports. 

Some details on the "Electronicam" and a 
picture of an original model were disclosed a 
few weeks ago in the annual report of Allen 
B. DuMont Labs [B°T, March 28]. 

Preparations for the demonstration already 
have been made. DuMont, it was reported, has 
shot film samples from its networked Captain 
Video and Paul Dixon shows, for the Thursday 
showing. 

Among reported uses for the camera was the 
suggestion aired a fortnight ago for a "film 
university" which, if effected, would bring 
DuMont and Columbia U. (or New York U.) 
together in a mass adult education program via 
combined live-film resources [B»T, April 4]. 

Chromatic Planning 
Color Set Under $500 

CHROMATIC Television Labs believes it has 
about developed a color tv set that could retail 
at less than $500, a spokesman for the research 
and development laboratory admitted last week. 

A report that the set would be demonstrated 
publicly in June, however, was called "prema- 
ture." Chromatic's spokesman added that 
"chances are good" that the receiver could be 
manufactured at a price "under $500." The 
Chromatic research firm would use the single- 
gun, Lawrence tube, developed by Dr. Ernest 
Lawrence of Stanford U. 

Also reported, but unconfirmed by Chro- 
matic, are plans for using only 24 tubes in the 
receiver as compared to the minimum of 28 
contained in sets now on the market. Picture 
tube size, it was said, would be large-screen, 
either 21 or 22 inches. Chromatic is 50% 
owned by Paramount Pictures. 

February Radio Production 
Shows Large Gain Over '54 

PRODUCTION of radio sets in February far 
exceeded the figure for one year ago and was 
ahead of January of this year, according to 
Radio-Electronics-Tv Mfrs. Assn. The figure 
for February was 1,089,724 sets compared to 
769,232 in the same 1954 month and 1,068,146 
in January 1955. 

Tv output in February reached 702,514 sets 
compared to 654,582 in January and 426,933 
in February 1954. 

Of tv sets made in February, 101,217, or 
14.4%, had uhf tuning. Fm tuning was in- 
corporated in 17,751 radios plus 1,026 tv sets. 

Radio output in the first two months of 1955 
totaled 2,157,870 sets compared to 1,641,213 in 
the same 1954 period. Tv two-month output 



this year was 1,357,096 sets compared to 847,- 
504 in the same 1954 period. 

Data for the two months of 1955: 

Television Home Sets Portables 
January 654,582 280,121 47,303 



February 
TOTAL 

January 
February 

TOTAL 



232,831 
512,952 



702,514 
1,357,096 
Auto 
573,837 
597,742 

1,171,579 316,916 2,157,870 



109,120 
156,423 
Total Radio 
1,068,146 



Clock 
166,885 

150,031 1,089,724 



Sylvania Names Weiss 
Ehlers to New Positions 

PROMOTION of Walter A. Weiss to general 
manager of the radio tube division of Sylvania 
Electric Products Inc., Emporium, Pa., and the 
appointment of Herbert A. Ehlers to succeed 




MR. EHLERS 



MR. WEISS 



him as general manufacturing manager of the 
same division were announced last week by 
Matthew D. Burns, vice president of operations 
for the company. 

Mr. Weiss' advancement follows the recent 
appointment of Mr. Burns to his present post 
from that of general manager of the radio tube 
division. Mr. Weiss worked parttime for the 
radio plant while attending Pennsylvania State 
U. and became a test equipment engineer on 
a fulltime basis in 1941. He later became super- 
visor of quality control, division manager of 
quality control, manager of the plant at Em- 
porium and manager of the company's Burling- 
ton (Iowa) radio tube plant. 

Mr. Ehlers joined the company in 1933 as a 
factory engineer at Emporium where he now 
will make his headquarters. He later served as 
manager of product engineering for the radio 
tube division and manager of the Huntington 
(W. Va.) plant, his most recent post. 

$50,000 Tv Station 
Offered by Dage Tv 

A COMPLETE low-powered tv station for 
$50,000 is being offered by Dage Television 
Div., Thompson Products Inc., Michigan City, 
Ind. 

The equipment has been offered tv stations 
pending FCC approval of the proposal to per- 
mit low-powered tv operations in cities of 
50,000 population or less [B»T, April 41. 

Last October, Dage completed installation of 
a low power tv installation for the U. S. Air 
Force on the Azores Islands. More recently it 
has finished a similar station at the Air Force 
base on Iceland. There are three others under 
construction, the company said. 

Using a 200 w transmitter, capable of radi- 
ating up to 600 w with an antenna gain of three, 
Dage offers the following: 

Plan I — for film and network programs only, 
$34,904. Plan II — same as Plan I with single 
live vidicon camera, $45,865. Plan III — same 
as Plan I with two live vidicon cameras, 
$51,382. 

Excluded from the above prices are the costs 
of installation, tower and transmitter and studio 
housing. 



Page 104 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



WKMI 

KALAMAZOO 



AWARDS 



GOBEL, DALY WIN PEABODY AWARDS 



CBS places four, NBC and ABC 

both place three. WJAR-TV, 

KGAK, NAM also selected. 

Presentations to take place in 

New York April 20. 

GEORGE GOBEL, for tv entertainment, and 
John Daly, for radio-tv news, were named the 
top individual winners of the 13 George Foster 
Peabody awards being announced today (Mon- 
day). 

Network winners in the 15th annual compe- 
tition were CBS (four awards), NBC (three) 
and ABC (three). 

Presentation ceremonies will take place April 
20 in the Hotel Roosevelt, New York, in con- 
junction with a luncheon of the Radio & Tele- 
vision Executives Society of New York. 
Peabody categories and winners are: 
Television entertainment: George Gobel, 
NBC. 

Radio-television news: John Daly, ABC. 
Television education: Adventure, CBS. 
Television special awards: Omnibus and The 
Search, both CBS. 



Television — youth-children's : Disneyland, 
ABC. 

Television national public service: Industry 
on Parade, National Assn. of Manufacturers. 

Television regional public service: WJAR-TV 
Providence, R. I., for "Hurricane Carol." 

Radio entertainment: Conversation, NBC. 

Radio education: Man's Right to Knowledge, 
CBS. 

Radio contribution to international under- 
standing: Pauline Frederick at the UN, NBC. 

Radio local public service: KGAK Gallup, 
N. M., for The Navajo Hour. 

Radio music (a citation): Boris Goldovsky 
(Metropolitan Opera), ABC. 

Bennett Cerf, radio-tv performer, lecturer, 
publisher and author, is to be presentation 
master of ceremonies. Walt Disney, Clifton 
Fadiman, Miss Frederick and Messrs. Gobel 
and Daly are expected to take part in the 
awards program. 

KGAK also was awarded an Alfred I. du- 
Pont award last month [B»T, March 28] for its 
specialized programming to the local Navajo 
and Zuni Indian market. 




Mr. Daly 



Mr. Disney 



Miss Frederick 



Mr. Gobel 




Clifton Fadiman 
Host 
'Conversation' 



Chas. Collingwood 
Narrator 
'Adventure' 



Allistair Cooke 
Narrator 
'Omnibus' 



Helen Sioussat 
Dir. Talks, CBS, 'Man's 
Right to Knowledge' 




Milton Cross 
Commentator 
'Met Opera' 



Merle H. Tucker 
Pres. -Gen. Mgr. 
KGAK Gallup 



Peter James 
Manager 
WJAR-TV Providence 



G. W. Johnstone 
Radio-Tv Dir. 
Natl. Assn. of Mfrs. 




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Broadcasting • 



Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 105 



AWARDS 



INTERNATIONAL 



KDKA, WQAN Take Firsts 
In Pa. -Del. AP Radio Awards 

KDKA Pittsburgh and WQAN Scranton won 
the first place awards for general news for 
stations 5 kw and over and under 5 kw, re- 
spectively, in the newscasting awards announced 
April 1 by the Pennsylvania-Delaware AP Radio 
Assn. 

In second and third place behind KDKA 
were WIP Philadelphia and WILK Wilkes- 
Barre. Placing behind WQAN were WKAP 
Allentown and WRAK Williamsport. 

Other award winners in the order of finish 
were: 

WBVP Beaver Falls, WAZL Hazleton, WQAN. 
sports news; WILK, WIP, commentary; WQAN, 
farm news; WQAN, WESB Bradford, women's 
news. 

Special citations: WCNR Bloomsburg, WILK, 
WBRE Wilkes-Barre, WBVP, WMRF Lewistown, 
WCHA Chambersburg, WBPZ Lock Haven, WHP 
Harrisburg and WLYC Williamsport. 

Judges in the contest were: Monroe Benton, 
news director, WELM Elmira, N. Y.; Walter 
D. Engels, manager of news and special events, 
WPIX (TV) New York, and Robert B. Mac- 
Dougall, director of public relations and educa- 
tional activities, WAAT-WATV (TV) Newark, 
N. J. 

RCA Wins Two ABP Awards 

TWO awards for "outstanding advertisements 
published in merchandising publications during 
1954" were presented last week to the RCA 
Victor Television Div. of RCA by the 13th 
annual advertising competition sponsored by 
Associated Business Publications. Presentations 
were made at a joint luncheon meeting of 
ABP and the Sales Executives Club of New 
York at the Hotel Roosevelt. The "First Award" 
was for a color ad which introduced the 1954 
line of RCA Victor tv sets to retailers. An 
"Award of Merit" was given for a series of 
nine ads acquainting dealers with features of 
the merchandise. 

George Polk Awards Presented 

GEORGE POLK Memorial Awards luncheon 
was held last Thursday at the Hotel Roosevelt, 
New York. Plaques were presented following 
the luncheon. In the radio-tv reporting field, 
Eric Sevareid of CBS, received an award. A 
special award was presented to the public affairs 
department of NBC and an award for com- 
munity service was presented to WNYC New 
York. 



AWARD SHORTS 

Don Herbert, star, NBC-TV Mr. Wizard, pre- 
sented citation from Chicago chapter, American 
Chemical Society, for "important contributions 
to science education." 

WGLV (TV) Easton, Pa., presented award from 
National Exchange Club "for outstanding sup- 
port" of National Crime Prevention Week. 

John Terry, news director, WVKO Columbus, 
Ohio, presented scroll from city's firemen for 
his work in helping better their salaries and 
benefits. 

WMAR-TV Baltimore presented citation of 
merit by Tall Cedars Muscular Dystrophy 
Fund and Muscular Dystrophy Assn. of Ameri- 
ca for its work in collecting funds to fight that 

disease. 

WGN-AM-TV Chicago honored by Ameri- 
can Legion's Voiture 220 Society for its co- 
operation in helping to publicize society's an- 
nual Christmas "Gifts to Yanks Who Gave" 
program. 

Dr. Albert B. Sabin, U. of Cincinnati professor, 
on WCPO-TV that city's Dotty Mack Show, 
presented International Sertoma Club's 1954 
distinction for service to mankind award for 
his research work on polio, encephalitis, etc. 

Ed Viehman, host of Mr. Nobody Show on 
WCCO Minneapolis, named winner of Min- 
neapolis Junior Chamber of Commerce's annual 
award for outstanding public service; Arle 
Haeberle, director of women's activities, same 
station, also was recipient of Jaycee award. 

Jack Allen Potts, program director, WCTC 
New Brunswick, N. J., has been awarded 
Jewish War Veterans' Outstanding Citizen and 
Americanism Medal for 1955 by organization's 
local post. 

George Burns, co-star of CBS-TV George Burns 
and Grade Allen, received Boys' Clubs of 
America's Special Man & Boy Award in 
recognition of outstanding citizenship attained 
by former Boys' Club member. 

Harry Wismer, MBS sportscaster, presented 
1955 sports award by Amvets organization for 
work in promotion of sports as deterrent to 
juvenile delinquency. 

ABC-TV College Press Conference (Sun., 4:30- 
5 p.m. EST) presented "Barbed Wire Award" 
from American Heritage Foundation March 
27 for assistance program has given to work 
of Crusade for Freedom. 



St. Laurent Says He Opposes 
Switch From CBC Regulation 

CANADA'S Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent 
is against establishment of a separate and inde- 
pendent regulatory body for radio and televi- 
sion and he is for maintenance of the present 
system whereby the government's Canadian 
Broadcasting Corp. regulates all radio and tele- 
vision in Canada. This he stated in the Cana- 
dian House of Commons at Ottawa on March 
31 when questioned about the recommendation 
of the National Liberal Federation that a royal 
commission be formed to consider establishing 
a body to exercise control over the CBC and 
private stations. Although it was his personal 
opinion, it was interpreted as a warning that 
demands of the opposition parties and the 
Canadian Assn. of Radio & Television Broad- 
casters for an independent tribunal would not 
get very far so long as he remained Prime 
Minister and head of the Liberal Party. The 
advisory council of the National Liberal Fed- 
eration made the recommendation at Ottawa 
on March 30. 

Pioneer Membership Open 

MEMBERSHIP in the Pioneer Club of the 
Canadian Assn. of Radio & Television Broad- 
casters is being held open until April 30. The 
CARTB Pioneer Club Committee has learned 
that a number of men who have been in 
Canadian broadcasting since before 1926 have 
not joined the organization. Anyone in the 
Canadian industry with more than 25 years 
of service prior to Dec. 31, 1951, is eligible 
for membership in the Pioneer Club. After 
April 30, 1955, nominations will be permanent- 
ly closed, CARTB executive vice president 
T. J. Allard has announced. 

Three Get Rogers Award 

THREE ONTARIO radio stations, CHUM 
Toronto, CFOR Orillia and CFJB Brampton, 
were awarded the Col. Keith Rogers Memorial 
Award by Canadian General Electric Co. Ltd., 
Toronto, for outstanding services during hurri- 
cane Hazel last October. The presentations were 
made at the annual dinner of the Canadian 
Assn. of Radio & Television Broadcasters at 
the Chateau Frontenac, Quebec, on March 21 
[B*T, March 28]. 

INTERNATIONAL SHORTS 

CJON-TV St. John's, Nfld., ch. 4, expects to 
have test pattern on air by July 25 and will 
start operations by end of August, as first sta- 
tion in island province. 

INTERNATIONAL PEOPLE 

Neil Leroy, formerly with O'Neill, Larson & 
McMahon, Toronto, to Gislason-Reynolds Ltd., 
Toronto, as radio-tv supervisor. 

David G. McLaughlin, account executive, Vick- 
ers & Benson Ltd., Toronto, to program div., 
All-Canada Radio Facilities Ltd., Toronto. 

Jack Hulme, Ontario sales representative, pro- 
gram div., All-Canada Radio Facilities Ltd., 
Toronto, to tv time sales and service dept., All- 
Canada Television, Toronto, succeeding Bill 
Stoeckel who joins national sales staff, CHCH- 
TV Hamilton, Ont. 

AI Davidson, news editor, CKY Winnipeg, Man., 
selected by External Affairs Dept. of Canada to 
make NATO tour of Belgium, Netherlands and 
Luxembourg to observe accomplishments and 
present developments of NATO in area. 





Quincy, Illinois 

New York City 

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Houston, Texas 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

Atlanta, Georgia 

New York, 
International Div. 

Montreal, Quebec, 
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Page 106 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting • Telecasting 



EDUCATION 



— PROFESSIONAL SERVICES — 



McConnaughey, Hennock 
To Address IERT Meet 

FCC Chairman George C. McConnaughey and 
Comr. Frieda B. Hennock are scheduled speak- 
ers at 25th anniversary sessions of Ohio State 
U.'s Institute for Education by Radio-Televi- 
sion, which gets underway tomorrow (Tuesday) 
at the Deshler-Hilton Hotel, Columbus. Ses- 
sions run through Friday. 

Mr. McConnaughey, at the Thursday 25th 
anniversary dinner, will join with Davidson 
Taylor, NBC vice president in charge of public 
affairs, and David D. Henry, executive vice 
chancellor of New York U. and chairman of 
the Joint Committee on Educational Tv, in 
examining "The Shape of Things to Come." 
This will be followed by the presentation of 
awards by Judith C. Waller, chairman of the 
IERT awards committee. 

Miss Hennock will address a Thursday morn- 
ing clinic on campus stations. Taking part in 
the same session will be Jim Bruce, WLWT 
(TV) Cincinnati program manager, Rev. Francis 
J. Heyden, director of the Georgetown U. 
(D. C.) Forum, and Jerome A. Fallon, Notre 
Dame Speech Dept., who will serve as chair- 
man. 

Dr. I. Keith Tyler, director of the institute 
and director of radio activities at OSU, at 
the opening session will discuss "Educational 
Broadcasting Comes of Age." World-wide 
aspects of broadcasting will be considered in 
a Wednesday session featuring Eugene King, 
program manager of the Voice of America, 
Alec Sutherland of BBC New York, and Burton 
Paulu, manager of KUOM, U. of Minn, sta- 
tion and former senior Fulbright research 
scholar with BBC. 

In addition to other featured speakers, 15 
work-study sessions and clinics and 16 special- 
interest groups are scheduled. 

Northwestern U. Slates 
Information Access Clinic 

NORTHWESTERN U.'s Medill School of 
Journalism will conduct a freedom of infor- 
mation clinic on the Evanston (111.) campus 
sometime in May, inviting midwest editors and 
lawyers to discuss relationship between news 
media and the legal profession. 

Jacob Scher, university journalism professor^ 
who made the announcement, has just been 
appointed editor of the Freedom of Informa- 
tion News Digest, sponsored by the National 
Editorial Assn. The digest is intended to keep 
readers abreast of developments in "the con- 
tinuing struggle for access to the news." Pro- 
hibition of television from public meetings and 
courtrooms is one of the "areas of conflict," 
Mr. Scher noted. 

The Medill clinic will deal with this and 
other problems, including the general problems 
of libel, privacy and contempt of court. 

Similar sessions on news access will be held 
in the Midwest by the AP April 1 and Illinois 
News Broadcasters Assn. April 2 at meetings 
in Springfield, 111. 

Commercial Tv, Education 
! Liaison Asked by Dunham 

COMMERCIAL broadcasters should be part- 
ners in the enterprise of applying television to 

I education, Dr. Franklin Dunham, chief of 

| radio-tv, U. S. Office of Education, said last 

| Wednesday in Spokane, Wash. 

He spoke on "How We Can Make Television 

I Our Ally in Education," before the Inland Em- 
pire Educational Assn., composed of leading 
educators from Idaho, Montana, Oregon and 



Washington. 

"Not being entertainers," Dr. Dunham said, 
"we should quietly retire from a field where 
we have little or no competence and develop 
that side of television's potential which we 
recognize as education." 

He advised ". . . that it is foolish to com- 
pete with commercially-operated television sta- 
tions on the entertainment level and just as 
questionable to spend large sums of money to 
duplicate their spot-news and special events 
programs." A "clearly-understood liaison" with 
commercial broadcasting is needed, Dr. Dun- 
ham said. 

He outlined the characteristics that made 
television a "distinctive tool of learning" and 
said these are the same characteristics that make 
tv a superior medium for advertising. He ex- 
plained: . . . "good advertising is as far 
from entertainment, as is education." Both 
must be convincing, he asserted. 

Many programs on the commercial networks 
"all grist to the mill" of the intelligently con- 
ducted classrooms of the nation on the high 
school level, Dr. Dunham declared. He specu- 
lated that someday there may be an educational 
program network. 

Tv Scholarships Announced 

AVAILABILITY of 10 graduate scholarships, 
worth $750 each for study and experience in 
television, has been announced by Boston U. 
and WGBH-TV Boston, owned by the Lowell 
Institute Cooperative Broadcasting Council. The 
scholarships, effective next July and good for 
a calendar year, allow for advanced courses 
in communication at Boston U. and regular 
production crew assignments on the station. 
Applicants, who must hold a bachelor's degree, 
may obtain forms from Prof. Leo Martin, 
Chairman, Div. of Communication Arts, School 
of Public Relations & Communication, Boston 
U., 84 Exeter St., Boston. 

Teachers Buy Tv Time 

NEW YORK Teachers Guild (AFL) a fortnight 
ago purchased a half-hour on WABD (TV) New 
York to present its story, George L. Baren- 
Bregge, general manager, announced. It is 
reportedly the first time in television that an 
organization of this type has bought tv time. 

The telecast, titled The Crisis in Education, 
featured discussion of problems confronting the 
educator. All participants in the program were 
school teachers in the New York City school 
system. 



Broadcast Management Inc. 
Formed as Business Counsel 

FORMATION of Broadcast Management Inc., 
New York, specializing in talent and business 
counsel for radio and tv organizations, has 
been announced by Marvin Josephson of the 
CBS-TV legal department. Mr. Josephson re- 
signed from CBS-TV April 1. 

The new firm will represent Information 
Productions Inc., New York, and other clients. 
IP produces CBS-TV's The Search, You Are 
There and the forthcoming Conquest of the 
Air. The firm also will serve as business ad- 
viser to agencies in negotiating network and 
national spot transactions. The firm's headquar- 
ters is at 5 E. 57th St. Telephone is Eldorado 
5-1722. 

Beeuwkes Opens Consultancy 

LAMBERT BEEUWKES, who resigned last 




February as general 
manager of the Vic 
Diehm station in 
Boston, WVDA, has 
opened a radio-tele- 
vision station man- 
agement consultancy 
office, Mr. Beeuwkes 
has announced. 

The office is at 
1015 Little Building, 
Boston, and the tele- 
phone number is 
Hubbard 2-2070. 



MR. BEEUWKES A 23 "y ear broad " 

casting veteran, Mr. 

Beeuwkes has managed WROV Roanoke and 

WDAS Philadelphia. He also has handled 

sales and promotion at KYW Philadelphia, 

WXYZ Detroit, MBS and the Lone Ranger 

Inc. 

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE PEOPLE 

Paul Scheltels, formerly with Ben Sonnenberg, 
N. Y., publicity firm, resigns to become full 
partner with Mickey Greenman in Publicity 
Assoc., N. Y. 

Franklin E. Brill, formerly vice president and 
director of public relations, defunct Cecil & 
Presbrey, N. Y., to Stephen Fitzgerald & Co. 
there, public relations firm, as principal asso- 
ciate. 



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Broadcasting • Telecasting 



April 11, 1955 • Page 107 



PROGRAMS AND PROMOTION 




KYW Philadelphia is "popping its cork" over the December 1954 Nielsen ratings which 
show the station to be the one most listened to in the city. Agency people in Philadel- 
phia, New York, Chicago and Detroit were served miniature champagne bottles in wine 
buckets and a special promotion brochure by models and sales representatives. Re- 
ceiving the promotions for the Lavenson Bureau of Advertising, Philadelphia, is J. H. 
Lavenson (seated), president. L to r: Yvonne Collins, model who made the presentation; 
R. H. Teter, KYW sales manager, and William Sherry, KYW sales representative. 



RECORDING IN A JET 

WHEN Paul Long, newscaster of KDKA Pitts- 
burgh and a flyer during World War II, tried 
his hand at piloting a modern jet, the radio 
audience "rode" with him. His voice, tape-re- 
corded as he handled the controls of an Air 
National Guard T-33 jet 18,000 ft. above west- 
ern Pennsylvania, was heard on the April 2 
broadcast of the Perspective show, a KDKA 
weekly news and news feature program. On 
March 23 Mr. Long and Jerry Landay, KDKA 
news supervisor, took turns going up with 
pilots of the 147th Fighter Squadron of the 
Pennsylvania Air Guard's 112th Fighter Wing. 
Their voices as they talked to each other and 
to the pilots on the plane's intercom and air- 
ground radio were tape-recorded at the Guard's 
base at the Greater Pittsburgh Airport and then 
edited into a half-hour program. 

6,000 HAMBURGERS 

SIX-HOUR spot announcement campaign on 
KWIZ Santa Ana, Calif., to advertise the sale 
of two hamburgers for the price of one, sold 
over 6,000 for the two Hall's Drive-in restau- 
rants there, KWIZ reports. Not only did the 
station's disc m.c. staff promote the sale on the 
air, but turned out en masse to man the ham- 
burger griddles at the drive-ins. 

LIVE OPERATION 

WSB-TV Atlanta March 30 presented "Opera- 
tion Lung Cancer," a live, local production 
of an operation to remove part of a diseased 
lung, produced in cooperation with the Georgia 
division of the American Cancer Society, the 
Fulton County (Ga.) Medical Society and 
greater Atlanta's Red Cross blood bank. The 
show took viewers into the operating room of 
an Atlanta hospital while surgeons were at 
work and the cameras occasionally shifted to 
the WSB-TV studios where a panel of doctors 
discussed the operation's progress. A further 
hospital report was aired on a news show fol- 
lowing the regular program. A complete fol- 
low-through of the case is being conducted 
through film interviews with the patient and 
doctor until the patient himself is able to ap- 
pear in the station's studios to review the case. 

RAB PRESENTATION 

RADIO'S ability to introduce a new line or 
product effectively, to excite dealers and to 
pre-sell consumers is pointed up in a new 
Radio Advertising Bureau presentation, "Harder 
Selling for Hard Goods," distributed to mem- 
bers April 1. 



WNYC BOOK FESTIVAL 

THIRD annual book festival sponsored by 
WNYC New York will be held April 1-7, it 
has been announced by Seymour N. Siegel, 
director of radio communications for the City 
of New York. Event will feature over 100 spe- 
cial programs covering all aspects of writing, 
production, criticism and appreciation of books, 
he said. The station plans to broadcast special 
reading and discussion programs throughout 
the week. All of WNYC's regularly-scheduled 
shows will also back the literary theme during 
the week. The festival is presented each year 
in conjunction with the American Book Pub- 
lishers Council. 

TWO DOLLARS FOR ONE 

TO WHET the appetites of advertisers and 
agencies in WLW Cincinnati's "Two for One" 
plan and a planned meeting to explain the offer, 
the station distributed a series of three ashtrays 
with attached quarters, half-dollars and silver 
dollars spelling out "1 = 2" on WLW. The 
last day before the meeting each person to be 
present received a leather-boudd "Today's 
Mail" folder containing a letter from R. E. 
Dunville, Crosley Broadcasting president, 
thanking them for their attendance at the 
planned meeting. The station also prepared a 
special brochure describing the "Two for One" 
plan wherein a client receives a dollar's worth 
of WLW advertising and a dollar's worth of 
merchandising and promotion for a dollar 
spent. 

WABD (TV) SALES BROCHURE 

BROCHURE titled "How to Pinpoint More 
Sales With Your New York Tv Advertising," 
was distributed by Avery-Knodel, station rep- 
resentative firm, on behalf of WABD (TV) 
there. Among the points stressed in the promo- 
tion piece are: WABD has shown the largest 
numerical gain of any New York tv station in 
the number of spot accounts during the 1953- 
54 period; the size of the station's nighttime 
audience and documentation of WABD's low 
cost of reaching each tv family. Advertiser 



success stories and details of WABD's exclusive 
merchandising plan for supermarket-distributed 
products are also included in the report. 

CELEBRITY MOTORCADE 

A MOTORCADE, sponsored by Tv Guide in 
cooperation with NBC, General Motors (Olds- I 
mobile Div.) and Balaban & Katz theatres, 
rolled down Chicago streets, laden with national j 
celebrities, as a special salute prior to the Holly- 
wood Academy Awards presentation on NBC- j 
TV last fortnight. The promotion was in 
connection with Tv Guide's cover picture-pre- j 
view of the Hollywood event in its issue last I 
fortnight. The 1 2-car motorcade passed through 
Chicago's loop on March 25. 

AMERICANS IN SAUDI ARABIA 

SERIES of oh-the-scene recorded interviews 
with Americans now working in Saudi Arabia 
for the Arabian American Oil Co., including I 
popular Arabian recipes for women's shows, ( 
have been distributed free to radio stations in ! 
the U. S. by Sessions & Caminita, 777 14th St., i 
N.W., Washington 5, D.C., public relations ' 
counsel for the oil firm. No advertising is 
contained in the interviews, usable on both 
sponsored and sustaining programs. The re- j 
cipe features already have been ordered by 
some 300 stations, according to Ludwig Cam- 
inita Jr., firm partner. Discs and tapes are \ 
being offered exclusive in each market on a j 
first request basis. ' 



WOR SALES CONTEST 

WINNER of first prize in a sales contest 
at WOR New York, was Martin B. Mon- 
roe, account executive. He is off to Flor- 
ida with his family for a two-week vaca- 
tion with the station picking up the tab. 
During the competition, salesmen were 
awarded points on the basis of new ac- 
counts brought in, advertisers new to ra- 
dio and similar classifications. 



URANIUM PROSPECTING 

WOULD-BE prospectors with tv sets in 
the San Antonio area will be helped on 
their way to a strike by WOAI-TV 
there, which is starting a tv course in 
uranium prospecting and related aspects 
next Sunday (April 17). Co-sponsored by 
St. Mary's U., the course will consist 
of eight half-hour programs on suc- 
cessive weeks and will be taught by ex- 
perts in the fields of geology, mining, 
physics and law. Instructors will be 
drawn from the staffs of St. Mary's, the 
Southwest Research Institute and two 
mining companies. The program, which 
will include interviews and visual demon- 
strations, is in answer to interest evi- 
denced in several uranium strikes in the 
vicinity. 



Page 108 • April 11, 1955 



Broadcasting 



Telecasting 



FOR THE RECORD 



Station Authorizations, Applications 

(As Compiled by B • T) 

March 31 through April 6 

Includes data on new stations, changes in existing stations, ownership changes, hearing 
cases, rules & standards changes and routine roundup. 

Abbreviations: 



CP — construction permit. DA — directional an- 
tenna. ERP — effective radiated power. STL — 
studio-transmitter link, synch, amp. — synchro- 
nous amplifier, vhf — very high frequency, uhf — 
ultra high frequency, ant. — antenna, aur. — aural, 
vis. — visual, kw — kilowatts, w — watts, mc — 



megacycles. D — day. N — night. LS — local sun- 
set, mod. — modification, trans. — transmitter, 
unl. — unlimited hours, kc — kilocycles. SSA — 
special service authorization. STA — special tem- 
porary authorization. (FCC file and hearing 
docket numbers given in parentheses.) 



FCC Commercial Station Authorizations 
As of Feb. 28, 1955 * 



Licensed (all on air) 
CPs on air 
CPs not on air 
Total on air 
Total authorized 
Applications in hearing 
New station requests 
New station bids in hearing 
Facilities change requests 
Total applications pending 
Licenses deleted in Feb. 
CPs deleted in Feb. 



AM 


FM 


TV 


2,687 


525 


130 


5 


17 


+318 


101 


11 


130 


2,692 


542 


448 


2,793 


553 


578 


137 


2 


167 


186 


5 


17 


76 





151 


146 


7 


36 


755 


67 


222 





3 





1 





2 



* Does not include noncommercial educational 
fm and tv stations. 

t Authorized to operate commercially, but sta- 
tion. may not yet be on air. 

Am and Fm Summary through April 6 

Appls. In 

Pend- Hear- 

CPs ing ing 

115 192 77 

32 7 2 



Am 
Fm 



On 
Air 

2,705 
542 



Licensed 

2,696 
526 



Television Station Grants and Applications 
Since April 14, 1952 

Grants since July 7 7, 7952: 

vhf uhf Total 

Commercial 276 319 597* 

Educational 17 18 35 

Total Operating Stations in U. S.: 

vhf uhf Total 

Commercial on air 310 107 417 

Noncommercial on air 9 3 12 

Applications filed since April 14, 7952: 





New 


Amend. 


vhf 


uhf 


Total 


Commercial 


959 


337 


740 


537 


1,278= 


Educational 


57 




29 


28 


57 3 


Total 


1,015 


337 


769 


565 


l,335i 



1 One hundred-thirty-six CPs (26 vhf, 110 

have been deleted. 

2 One applicant did not specify channel. 

3 Includes 35 already granted. 

4 Includes 630 already granted. 



uhf) 



KCOH 



HOUSTON 



KNOK 

FT. WORTH- 
DALLAS 

formerly KWBC 



WMRY 

NEW 
ORLEANS 



a 



order 
delivers 
the Negro 
Population 
of the 

Souths 
Largest Markets 
...cuts cost, too! 



Gill-Perna, Inc., Nat'l Representatives 
Lee F. O'Connell, West Coast 



ACTIONS OF FCC 
New Tv Stations . . . 



ACTION BY FCC 

Roanoke, Va.— Times World Corp. (WDBJ) 

granted vhf ch. 7 (174-180 mc); EHP 316 kw visual, 
158 kw aural; antenna height above average 
terrain 1,997 ft., above ground 573.5 ft. Estimated 
construction cost $525,064, first year operating 
cost $238,450, revenue $191,400. Post office address: 
201-203 W. Campbell Ave., Roanoke. Studio loca- 
tion: 124 W. Kirk Ave. Transmitter location: 
Ft. Lewis Mt. Geographic coordinates 37° 20' 37" 
N. Lat., 80° 04' 14" W. Long. Transmitter DuMont, 
antenna RCA. Legal counsel George O. Sutton, 
Washington. Consulting engineer George C. Da- 
vis, Washington. Principals include First Na- 
tional Exchange Bank of Roanoke, executor and 
trustee of the estate of J. P. Fishburn (49%); J. B. 
Fishburn (recently deceased) (40%); Vice Presi- 
dent and General Manager Shields Johnson; Vice 
President and Associate Publisher M. W. Armis- 
tead III; Treasurer R. H. Wills and Secretary 
Barton W. Morris Jr. Granted March 31. 

APPLICATION 

Tucson, Ariz. — D. W. Ingram & Kathleen Ingram 
d/b as Tucson Tv Co., vhf ch. 9 (186-192 mc); 
ERP 57.7 kw visual, 34.7 kw aural; antenna height 
above average terrain 190 ft., above ground 337.3 
ft. Estimated construction cost $271,655, first year 
operating cost $276,068, revenue $300,000. Post 
office address Box 2528, Tucson. Studio and 
transmitter location 1151 S. Warren, Tucson. 
Geographic coordinates 32° 12' 17" N. Lat., 110° 
56' 45" W. Long. Transmitter and antenna RCA. 
Legal counsel Welch, Mott & Morgan, Washing- 
ton. Consulting engineer Page, Creutz, Garrison 
& Waldschmitt, Washington. Mr. Ingram is 

I owner of lumber company and warehouses. 

1 Filed April 1. 



Existing Tv Stations . . . 

ACTIONS BY FCC 

KFSD-TV San Diego, Calif.— KFSD Inc. granted 
I mod. of CP for ch. 10 to change ERP to 245 kw 
l visual, 123 kw aural; antenna height above aver- 
age terrain 750 ft. Granted March 31; announced 
! April 5. 

KLIX-TV Twin Falls, Idaho— Southern Idaho 
Bcstg. & Tv Co. granted mod. of CP for ch. 11 
to change ERP to 29.5 kw visual and 14.5 kw 

Broadcasting • Telecasting 



aural. Granted March 31; announced April 5. 

KVTV (TV) Sioux City, Iowa— Cowles Bcstg. 
Co. granted mod. of CP for ch. 9 to change ERP 
to 285 kw visual, 142.5 kw aural; studio location 
to 614 Pierce St.; antenna height above average 
terrain 724 ft. Granted March 30; announced 
April 5. 

WLEX-TV Lexington, Ky. — WLEX-TV Inc. 

granted mod. of CP for ch. 18 to change ERP to 
200 kw visual and 100 kw aural. Granted March 
28; announced April 5. 

WGBH-TV Boston, Mass.— WGBH Educational 
Foundation granted STA to provide program 
services on reserved ch. 2 pending filing of li- 
cense application. Granted March 28; announced 
April 5. 

WABD (TV) New York — Allen B. DuMont Labs 
Inc. granted mod. of CP for ch. 5 to change 
ERP to 17 kw visual. 8.91 kw aural; antenna 
height above average terrain 1,340 ft. Granted 
April 1; announced April 5. 

WSJS-TV Winston-Salem, N. C. — Triangle 
Bcstg. Corp. granted mod. of CP for ch. 12 to 
change aural ERP to 200 kw; antenna height 
above average terrain 2,000 ft. Granted March 
29; announced April 5. 

KWTX-TV Waco, Tex. — KWTX Bcstg. Co. 
granted STA to operate commercially on ch. 10 
until Aug. 1, 1955. Granted March 24; announced 
April 5. 

KREM-TV Spokane, Wash. — Louis Wasmer 

granted mod. of CP for ch. 2 to change ERP to 
50 kw aural. Granted March 29; announced 
April 5. 

STATION DELETED 

WLEU-TV Erie, Pa. — Commodore Perry Bcstg. 
Service Inc. FCC deleted tv station on ch. 66 at 
request of- station. Deleted March 31. 

APPLICATIONS 

WKNY-TV Kingston, N. Y. — WKNY-TV Corp. 

seeks mod. of CP to change from ch. 66 to ch. 21 
and change station location from Kingston to 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. Filed April 1. 

WHIS-TV Bluefield, W. Va.— Daily Telegraph 
Printing Co. seeks mod. of CP for ch. 6 to change 
studio location to Municipal Building, corner 
Ramsey & Bland Sts., Bluefield. Filed March 31. 

New Am Stations . . . 

ACTIONS BY FCC 

Clifton, Ariz.— Henry Chester Darwin d/b as 
Darwin Bcstg. Co. granted 1450 kc, 250 w unlim- 
ited. Post office address Box 1394, Banning, Calif. 
Estimated construction cost $8,410, first year op- 



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TRINITY 3-8030 



April 11, 1955 • Page 109 



FOR THE RECORD 



erating cost $21,600, revenue $27,000. Mr. Darwin 
is sole owner of KPAS Banning, Calif. Granted 
March 31. 

Madison, Ga. — David Leonard Hitchcock grant- 
ed 1250 kc, 1 kw daytime. Post office address 
Beacon Heights, Madison. Estimated construc- 
tion cost $15,650, first year operating cost $10,140, 
revenue $100. Mr. Hitchcock is owner of local 
electrical appliance company. Granted March 31. 

Campbell, Ohio — Myron Jones granted 1570 kc, 
250 w daytime. Post office address 4004 Elmwood 
Ave., Erie, Pa. Estimated construction cost 
$12,095, first year operating cost $50,000, revenue 
$60,000. Mr. Jones is president-general manager- 
majority stockholder WJET Erie, Pa. Granted 
March 31. 

APPLICATION 

Long Branch, N. J. — Herbert Scott & Ralph 
E. P. Mellon d/b as Long Branch Bcstg. Co., 
1410 kc, 500 w daytime. Post office address 247 
High St., Pottstown, Pa. Estimated construction 
cost $23,100, first year operating cost $65,000, 
revenue $75,000. Principals include Herbert Scott 
(75%), 45% owner WPAZ Pottstown, Pa., and 
Ralph E. P. Mellon (25%), 22.5% owner WPAZ. 
Filed March 29. 

APPLICATIONS AMENDED 

Harlan, Ky. — Ky-Va Bcstg. Corp. amends bid 
for new am station on 1280 kc, 1 kw daytime to 
specify 1410 kc. Filed April 1. 

Clarksdale, Miss. — Anne P. McLendon, Harding 
Corley, Harvey T. Ross d/b as Coahoma Bcstg. 
Co. amend bid for new am station on 1570 kc, 
1 kw daytime to specify 1600 kc. Filed March 30. 



seeks CP to change from 1 kw daytime direc- 
tional to 5 kw non-directional on 970 kc. Filed 
April 1. 

WEKZ Monroe, Wis. — Green County Bcstg. Co. 

seeks CP to change from 500 w daytime to 1 kw 
daytime on 1260 kc. Filed March 31. 



Existing Am Stations 



ACTIONS BY FCC 

WMYR Ft. Myers, Fla. — Robert Hecksher grant- 
ed change from DA-N to DA-2 and day power 
from 1 kw to 5 kw, continuing operation on 1410 
kc, 500 w night. Granted March 30 

WJKO Springfield, Mass.— Springfield Bcstg. Co. 
granted change in combined transmitter and 
studio location to 567 Shaker Rd., East Long- 
meadow, Mass., with nondirectional operation 
while continuing operation on 1680 kc, 5 kw day- 
time. Granted March 30. 

WAAB Worcester, Mass. — WAAB Inc. granted 
change in daytime directional pattern while 
operating on 1440 kc, 5 kw unlimited. Granted 
March 30. 

WSAR Fall River, Mass. — The Fall River Bcstg. 
Co. granted CP to change directional antenna 
night pattern while operating on 1480 kc, 5 kw 
unlimited, directional. Granted March 30. 

WKOZ Kosciusko, Miss. — Cy N. Bahakel granted 
CP to change from 1340 kc, 250 w unlimited to 
1350 kc, 5 kw daytime. Granted March 30. 

KWEW Hobbs, N. M.-KWEW Inc. granted 
change from 1490 kc, 250 w unlimited to 1480 kc, 
1 kw unlimited, directional night. Granted March 
30. 

WPUV Pulaski, Va— Southwest Bcstg. Corp. 

granted permission to sign on at 6 a.m. and off 
at 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday; sign on at 
8 a.m. and off at 8 p.m. Sunday, effective imme- 
diately and continuing until favorable action has 
been taken on application to change from 1230 kc, 
250 w unlimited to 1580 kc, daytime only, with 
5 kw excepting critical hours when 250 w (Canad- 
ian restricted). Granted March 30; announced 
April 5. 

APPLICATIONS 

WARE Ware, Mass. — Central Bcstg. Corp. seeks 
CP to change from 1 kw daytime to 1 kw fulltime, 
directional night on 1250 kc. Filed April 1. 

KNBR North Platte, Neb. — John Townsend 



Existing Fm Stations 



ACTIONS BY FCC 

WLEY Elmwood Park, 111. — Elmwood Park 
Bcstg. Corp. granted CP to change from Class A 
to Class B on ch. 290 (105.9 mc); ERP 32 kw; 
antenna height above average terrain 250 ft. 
Granted March 31. 

WCOL-FM Columbus, Ohio — AirTrails Inc. 
granted mod. of license to reduce ERP to 24.5 kw. 
Granted March 30; announced April 15. 

Ownership Changes ... 

ACTIONS BY FCC 

KOSI Aurora, Colo. — Mid-America Bcstg. Co. 
granted assignment of license to Mid-America 
Bcstg. Co. Mr. David M. Segal, former owner, 
retains 94% of stock. Granted March 29; an- 
nounced April 5. 

WJIM-AM-TV Lansing, Mich. — WJIM Inc. 
granted mod. of licenses to change name to Gross 
Telecasting Inc. Granted March 28; announced 
April 5. 

WFIL-AM-FM-TV Philadelphia, Pa.— Philadel- 
phia Area Pub. Inc. (The Phila. Inquirer Div.) 

granted mod. of licenses to change name to Tri- 
angle Publications Inc. (Radio & Tv Div.). Grant- 
ed March 28; announced April 5. 

APPLICATIONS 

WABR Winter Park, Fla.— Orange County 
Bcstrs. Inc. seeks voluntary relinquishment of 
control by R. H. Gunckel Jr. through sale of 12% 
interest to Carmen Macri for $600. Messrs. 
Gunckel and Macri will now each own 40% inter- 
est. Filed March 29. 

WNEX-TV Macon, Ga. — Macon Tv Co. seeks 
transfer of control from W. A. Fickling and 
Macon Bcstg. Co. to J. C. Barnes Sr. and E. K. 
Cargill for $1 and assumption of $260,000 in lia- 
bilities. Mr. Barnes (75%) is Texas oilman and 
Mr. Cargill (25%) is former WMAX Macon ex- 
ecutive and theatre owner. Filed March 31. 

WDQN Du Quoin, 111. — Leonard M. Johnson & 
L. M. Johnson d/b as Ava Bcstg. Co. seek volun- 
tary assignment of license to M. R. Lankford 
tr/as Du Quoin Bcstg. Co. for $30,000. Mr. Lank- 
ford is owner of WRAY Princeton, Ind., and of 
WCBQ Sarasota, Fla., and stockholder of WRAY- 
TV Princeton. Filed March 28. 

WINI Murphysboro, 111. — Cecil W. Roberts seeks 
voluntary assignment of license to himself and 
his wife Jane A. Roberts as joint tenants. No 
consideration involved. Filed March 30. 

KCRB Chanute, KCLO Leavenworth, Kan.— 
Cecil W. Roberts seeks voluntary assignment of 
license to himself and his wife Jane A. Roberts 
as joint tenants. No consideration involved. Filed 
March 30. 

WFTG London, Ky. — States Bcstg. System Inc. 
seeks voluntary assignment of CP to London 
Bcstg. Co. for $4,500. Principals include Pres. 
Elmo Mills (50%), 16.2% owner WWKO Ashland, 
Ky.; Sec.-Treas. John P. Mills (40%), purchasing 
agent for coal company; Betty O. Mills (5%), 7% 
owner WWKO, and Frances S. Mills (5%). Filed 
March 28. 

KLOU Lake Charles, La. — The Pelican Bcstg. 
Co. seeks voluntary transfer of control to Gulf 
Bcstg. Co. through sale of all stock for $85,000. 
Principals include Pres. G. T. Owen Sr. (50%), 
pres. -stockholder WIBR Baton Rouge, La., and 
Vice Pres. Robert Earle (50%), vice pres. -stock- 
holder WIBR. Filed March 29. 

WJIM-AM-TV Lansing, Mich. — WJIM Inc. seeks 



California Fulltime Independent 
$60*000.00 

Single station market. Business index for the area shows 50% ahove 
national average in retail sales and income. Basic economy and agri- 
culture with growing industrial payrolls. Station is now showing nice 
profits. Climate is salubrious. Ideal profitable owner-operator property. 
Terms available. 

Appraisals • Negotiations • Financing 
BLACKBURN - HAMILTON COMPANY 



WASHINGTON, D. C. 
James W. Blackburn 
Clifford Marshall 
Washington Bldg. 
Sterling 3-4341-2 



RADIO-TV-NEWSPAPER BROKERS 

CHICAGO 
Ray V. Hamilton 
Phil Jackson 
Tribune Tower 
Delaware 7-2755-6 



SAN FRANCISCO 
William T. Stubblefield 

235 Montgomery St. 
Exbrook 2-5671-2 



voluntary transfer of control to Harold F. Gross 
and family in contemplation of sale of 193,000 
shares of stock to public. The Gross family will 
retain 51.1% interest. Filed March 22. 

WJPD Ishpeming, Mich. — Ishpeming Bcstg. Co. 
seeks voluntary transfer of 50% interest to Olive 
E. Deegan under terms of will of James P. 
Deegan, deceased. Filed March 28. 

KCHI Chillicothe, KBIA Columbia, KREI Farm- 
ington. Mo. — Cecil W. Roberts seeks voluntary 
assignment of license to himself and his wife 
Jane A. Roberts as joint tenants. Filed March 30. 

KBKR Baker, Ore. — Inland Radio Inc. seeks 
voluntary assignment of license to Oregon Trail 
Bcstg. Inc. for $65,000. Principals include Pres. 
Kenneth B. Lockwood, manager of KBKR; Vice 
Pres. Ruth H. Jacobs (99.9%), vice pres. of KBKR, 
and Sec.-Treas. Barbara J. Lockwood. Filed 
March 28. 

KWAT Watertown, S. D.— Midland National 
Life Ins. Co. seeks voluntary transfer of control 
to Clint W. Murchison through sale of 20,524 
shares of stock from voting trust for $2,257,640. 
Midland National Life is 95.9% stockholder of 
Tri-City Tv Corp., applicant for new tv station 
on ch. 3 at Watertown. Mr. Murchison, former 
32% owner of Midland National Life and holder 
of oil, gas and investment interests, will now own 
73.9% interest. Filed March 30. 



I 



\ 



i 



Hearing Cases 



INITIAL DECISIONS 

Jacksonville, Fla. — New tv, ch. 12. FCC hearing 
examiner Charles J. Frederick issued initial de- 
cision looking toward grant of the application of 
Jacksonville Bcstg. Corp. for new tv station on 
ch. 12 in Jacksonville, Fla., and denial of the 
competing applications of the City of Jacksonville 
and Florida-Georgia Television Co. Action April 4. 

Latrobe, Pa. — New am, 1480 kc. FCC hearing 
examiner Herbert Sharfman issued initial deci- 
sion looking toward grant of the application of 
Latrobe Bcstrs. for new am station to operate on 
1480 kc, 500 w, daytime only, conditioned upon 
applicant's filing, within 60 days of grant, an 
application for modification of permit specifying 
a site conforming to the Commission's rules and 
standards (Docket 10428). Action April 4. 

Seattle, Wash. — New tv, ch. 7. FCC hearing 
examiner Thomas H. Donahue issued initial deci- 
sion looking toward grant of the application of 
Queen City Bcstg. Co. for new tv station on ch. 
7 in Seattle, Wash., and denial of the competing 
applications of KXA Inc. and Puget Sound Bcstg. 
Co. Action April 5. 

OTHER ACTIONS 

Hartselle, Ala. — FCC by order granted petition 
by Dorsey Eugene Newman and waived Sect. 
3.28(c) — "10 percent rule" — in connection with his 
application for new am station in Hartselle, Ala., 
on 860 kc, 250 w, day, which is in consolidated 
hearing in Dockets 10638-40. Action March 31. 

AT&T Off-the- Air Tv Program Pick-Up Service 
— FCC invited comments by April 29 to proposal 
by AT&T to provide off-the-air tv program pick- 
up service. This supplemental action is pursuant 
to FCC proposed rule making of Sept. 15 inviting 
comments and proposals looking to a review of 
its existing rules and policies regarding inter-city 
tv relay stations. (See story B»T, April 4.) Action 
March 30. 

B. J. Parrish; KOTN; Southern Empire Bcstg. 
Co., Pine Bluff, Ark.; Southeastern Bcstg. Sys- 
tem, Macon, Ga.; KNOE Monroe, La.; WDAK 
Columbus, Ga. — FCC designated for consolidated 
hearing applications for CPs to operate am sta- 
tions on 540 kc and move KOTN from Pi